ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Getting Organized

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Getting Organized

URL:

https://www.nationalgeographic.org/lesson/getting-organized/

Content Source:

National Geographic
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

In this series of activities, students are introduced to the main types of microbes, scientific classification, how scientists organize living organisms, and the organization of the human body. They will also explore the smallest level of organization of the human body: the cell. They compare plant and animal cells by examining infographics that illustrate cell structures and relating them to organism functions.

Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 9-12
Biology
2 ) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to describe the function and diversity of organelles and structures in various types of cells (e.g., muscle cells having a large amount of mitochondria, plasmids in bacteria, chloroplasts in plant cells).


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
L12.3: Cellular processes are regulated both internally and externally by environments in which cells exist, including local environments that lead to cell differentiation during the development of multicellular organisms. During the development of complex multicellular organisms, cell differentiation is regulated through the expression of different genes.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
Crosscutting Concepts: Structure and Function
Disciplinary Core Idea: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the cell theory and discuss the historical context of its development.
  • Distinguish between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  • Compare and contrast various types of cells.
  • Using various sources (prepared or wet mount slides, images, digital animations), identify cellular organelles.
  • Gather, analyze, and communicate the diversity of organelles and structures that exist within different types of cells.
  • Based on their function, describe why certain organelles and structures are found in particular types of cells
.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Cell
  • Cell theory
  • Plasma membrane
  • Organelle
  • Cell structures (e.g., cell wall, cell membrane, cytoplasm, etc.)
  • Cell organelles (e.g., nucleus, chloroplast, mitochondrion, etc.)
  • Prokaryote
  • Eukaryote
  • Bacterial cell
  • Plant cell
  • Animal cell
  • Muscle cell
  • Other types of cells such as unicellular organisms (e.g., amoeba), nerve cell, sex cell (sperm/egg), etc.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Historical contributions to the cell theory by scientists such as Hooke, Leeuwenhoek, Schleiden etc.
  • The cell theory is one of the fundamental ideas of modern biology and includes three principles:
    1. All living things are composed of cells.
    2. Cells are the basic unit of structure and organization of all living organisms.
    3. Cells arise only from previously existing cells.
  • There are many types of organelles.
  • Eukaryotic cells contain a nucleus and other membrane bound organelles.
  • Prokaryotic cells are cells without a nucleus or other membrane bound organelles.
  • How organelles function within a cell.
  • How the function of organelles relates to their presence in various types of cells.
  • The characteristics of different types of cells can be determined based on the presence of certain organelles.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Obtain information about the function and diversity of organelles and cell structures.
  • Evaluate the function of a cell based on the presence or absence of particular organelles and/or cell structures.
  • Communicate information to describe the function of organelles and cell structures in various types of cells.
  • Communicate information to describe the diversity of organelles and structures in various types of cells.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Structures within different types of cells will have different functions.
  • Cellular function is related to the presence and number of particular organelles and cell structures.
  • Various types of cells can be identified by the presence of particular organelles and/or cell structures.
AMSTI Resources:
ASIM Module:
Comparing Cell Structures; Observing Protist Locomotion; Osmosis and Plasmolysis in Onion Cells; Why must Cells be Small?
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 9-12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
1 ) Develop and use models and appropriate terminology to identify regions, directions, planes, and cavities in the human body to locate organs and systems.

Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Developing and Using Models
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Develop and use models to appropriately identify the anatomical planes and anatomical directions associated with the human body.
  • Develop and use models and appropriate terminology to identify the anatomical regions and cavities in the human body.
  • Use appropriate anatomical terminology, anatomical landmarks and models to locate major organs and organ systems in the human body.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Transverse plane
  • Coronal plane/ frontal plane
  • Sagittal plane
  • Midsagittal line
  • Coelom
  • Dorsal cavity
  • Ventral cavity
  • Thoracic cavity
  • Abdominopelvic cavity
  • Cranial cavity
  • Anterior
  • Posterior
  • Dorsal
  • Ventral
  • Medial
  • Lateral
  • Proximal
  • Distal
  • Superficial
  • Visceral/deep
  • Plantar
  • Superior
  • Inferior
  • Abdominopelvic region
  • right/left hypochondriac region
  • epigastric region
  • right/left lumbar region
  • umbilical region
  • right/left iliac region
  • hypogastric region
  • right/left upper quadrant
  • right/left lower quadrant
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • In the human body there are eleven major organ systems, including the circulatory, digestive, nervous, excretory, respiratory, and reproductive systems. The skeletal, muscular, integumentary, immune, and endocrine systems complete the list of organ systems.
  • The cavities of the human body contain organ system components, and specific regions within these cavities house specific organs.
  • The use of appropriate terminology is necessary to accurately identify anatomical regions, directions, planes, and cavities in the human body.
  • The location of anatomical features, such as organs, within the human body and/or their relative position to other anatomical features of the human body can be accurately communicated using appropriate anatomical terminology.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Develop and use models based on evidence to illustrate the locational relationship of organs and organ systems in the human body.
  • Use appropriate anatomical terminology to identify and evaluate the location of organs and organ systems in the human body.
  • Interpret and accurately apply terminology related to the human body.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The human body, like all multicellular organisms, has a hierarchical structural organization where any one system is made up of numerous parts and is itself a component of the next level.
  • Humans are coelomates, meaning the human body contains fluid-filled cavities that are fully lined by mesoderm (skinlike tissue), and these cavities house specific organs.
  • Features of the human body, both internal and external, can be accurately landmarked using anatomical planes, cavities, and regions and anatomical directional terminology.
AMSTI Resources:
ASIM:

Human Body Organization and Anthropometry
Tags: cells, classification, human body
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/terms-of-service/
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Stephanie Carver