ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Harriet Tubman - A Kid Explains History, Episode 13

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Harriet Tubman - A Kid Explains History, Episode 13

URL:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YAPVs233Hc

Content Source:

Other
A Kid Explains History/YouTube
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from A Kid Explains History, Quinn explains the history and life of Harriet Tubman and her work on the underground railroad. With his precocious personality and kid-friendly vocabulary, Quinn makes learning history easy and fun for students of all ages. This video can be used to introduce Harriet Tubman, abolitionists, and/or the underground railroad. 

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 2
Living and Working Together in State and Nation
2 ) Identify national historical figures and celebrations that exemplify fundamental democratic values, including equality, justice, and responsibility for the common good.

•  Recognizing our country's founding fathers, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Patrick Henry, John Adams, John Hancock, and James Madison
•  Recognizing historical female figures, including Abigail Adams, Dolley Madison, Harriet Tubman, and Harriet Beecher Stowe
•  Describing the significance of national holidays, including the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Presidents' Day; Memorial Day; the Fourth of July; Veterans Day; and Thanksgiving Day
•  Describing the history of American symbols and monuments
Examples: Liberty Bell, Statue of Liberty, bald eagle, United States flag, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial

Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Living and Working Together in State and Nation
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify national historic figures, including the founding fathers and other historic male and female American's, and relate them to the democratic values each exemplifies.
  • Describe national celebrations, including their significance and democratic values associated with each.
  • Identify American symbols and monuments and describe the history and significance of each.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • historic figures (male and female)
  • celebrations
  • exemplify
  • democratic values
  • recognize
  • founding fathers
  • significance
  • national holidays
  • American symbols
  • monuments
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Fundamental democratic values including equality, justice, and responsibility for the common good.
  • The names and significance of national historic figures, both male and female.
  • The significance of national holidays and the relationship of each to democratic values.
  • The history and significance of American symbols and monuments.
  • Vocabulary: democratic values, equality, justice, responsibility, common good, founding father, national holiday, American symbol, monument
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify national historic figures and celebrations.
  • Identify the ways historic figures and celebrations exemplify fundamental democratic values.
  • Recognize our country's founding fathers and other historic male figures.
  • Recognize historic female figures.
  • Describe national holidays, including the significance of each and the democratic values associated with each.
  • Identify American symbols and monuments and describe the history and significance of each.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There is an importance and impact of national historic figures and celebrations.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.2.2- Describe the significant national holidays, including the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Presidents' Day; Memorial Day; the Fourth of July; Veterans Day; and Thanksgiving Day.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
12 ) Describe the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin and the role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimké, Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing the rise of religious movements in opposition to slavery, including objections of the Quakers
•  Explaining the importance of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 that banned slavery in new states north of the Ohio River
•  Describing the rise of the Underground Railroad and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman and the impact of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, on the abolitionist movement
Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate the impact of the abolitionist movement on the United States from the earliest groups, leaders, and legislation until right before the Civil War.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • impact
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Details of the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin.
  • The role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimke', Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner.
  • The role of religious movements in opposition to slavery, including objections of the Quakers.
  • The impact of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 that banned slavery in new states north of the Ohio River.
  • How the Underground Railroad developed, its impact on American society in the North and in the South, and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman.
  • The impact of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin on the abolitionist movement.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin to the development of later abolitionist societies.
  • Describe the rise of religious of movements in opposition to slavery.
  • Explain the importance of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.
  • Describe the rise of the Underground Railroad and it's leaders.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There was an important abolitionist movement in the United States from the earliest leaders and groups through the later groups, leaders, and legislation.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.12- Define abolition; understand the purpose of the abolitionist movement; identify important leaders and contributions of the abolitionist movement.


Tags: abolitionist, Harriet Tubman, slavery, underground railroad
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://www.youtube.com/t/terms
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
Comments

A Kid Explains History is free for teachers. Teachers do not need a YouTube account to access available videos. 

  This resource provided by:  
Author: Ginger Boyd