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Grade 4 Mathematics Module 3, Topic C: Multiplication of up to Four Digits by Single-Digit Numbers

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Grade 4 Mathematics Module 3, Topic C: Multiplication of up to Four Digits by Single-Digit Numbers

URL:

https://www.engageny.org/resource/grade-4-mathematics-module-3-topic-c-overview

Content Source:

EngageNY
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

Building on their work in Module 3, Topic B, students begin in Topic C decomposing numbers into base ten units in order to find products of single-digit by multi-digit numbers. Students practice multiplying by using models before being introduced to the standard algorithm. Throughout the topic, students practice multiplication in the context of word problems, including multiplicative comparison problems. In Lessons 7 and 8, students use place value disks to represent the multiplication of two-, three-, and four-digit numbers by a one-digit whole number. Lessons 9 and 10 move students to the abstract level as they multiply three- and four-digit numbers by one-digit numbers using the standard algorithm. Finally, in Lesson 11, partial products, the standard algorithm, and the area model are compared and connected via the distributive property (4.NBT.5).

Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 4
2. Solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison using drawings and write equations to represent the problem, using a symbol for the unknown number.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • When given word problems involving multiplicative comparison, will solve using concrete, pictorial representations, and write related equations involving a single unknown.

  • Example: There are 12 children and 3 adults at the playground. How many times as many children are at the playground than adults? Represent the situation with the equation 12 = n × 3 and a tape diagram with a total of 12 and groups of 3, repeating each group 4 times to solve.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Multiplicative comparison
  • Times as many
  • Product
  • Factor
  • Multiplication
  • Equation
  • Symbol
  • Additive comparison
  • Tape diagram
  • Unknown
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to find products and quotients.
  • Recognize situations represented by multiplicative comparison.
  • Distinguish between multiplicative comparison and additive comparison.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison.
  • Write equations using a symbol for the unknown to represent word problems involving multiplicative comparison.
  • Use drawings to represent the word situation involving multiplicative comparison.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • additive comparison focuses on the difference between two quantities and multiplicative comparison focuses on one quantity being some number times larger than another.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.4.2.1: Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
M.4.2.2: Recognize key terms to solve word problems.
Examples: in all, how much, how many, in each.
M.4.2.3: Apply properties of operations as strategies to add.
M.4.2.4: Recall basic multiplication facts.
M.4.2.5: Demonstrate computational fluency, including quick recall of addition and subtraction facts.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Demonstrate computational understanding of multiplication and division by solving authentic problems with multiple representations using drawings, words, and/or numbers.
  • Identify key vocabulary words to solve multiplication and division word problems.
    Examples: times, every, at this rate, each, per, equal/equally, in all, total.
  • Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
  • Recall basic multiplication facts.
  • Add and subtract within 20.
  • Represent repeated addition, subtraction, and equal groups using manipulatives.
  • Distinguish between rows and columns.
  • Use repeated addition to solve problems with multiple addends.
  • Count forward in multiples from a given number.
    Examples: 3, 6, 9, 12; 4, 8, 12, 16.
  • Recall doubles addition facts.
  • Model written method for composing equations.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.4.1 Solve one-step word problems involving real-life situations using the four operations within 100 without regrouping and select the appropriate method of computation when problem solving.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 4
11. Find the product of two factors (up to four digits by a one-digit number and two two-digit numbers), using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations.

a. Illustrate and explain the product of two factors using equations, rectangular arrays, and area models.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use strategies based on place value, properties of operations, rectangular arrays, area models, and equations to illustrate and explain the product of two factors (up to four digits by a one-digit number and two two-digit numbers).
Note: Standard algorithm is not an expectation for grade 4.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Product
  • Factor
  • Compose
  • Decompose
  • Digit
  • Strategy
  • Place value
  • Properties of operations
  • Equation
  • Rectangular array
  • Area model
  • Partial product
  • Multiple of 10
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How to compose and decompose numbers in a variety of ways using place value and the properties of operations.
  • How to represent the product of two factors using an area model.
  • Use strategies based on place value (partial products), the properties of operations, arrays and area models to represent a two digit factor times a two digit factor.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use strategies based on place value and the properties of operations to find products.
  • Illustrate the product of two factors using rectangular arrays and area models.
  • Explain the product of two factors using equations.
  • Make connections between models and equations.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • arrays, area models, place value strategies, and the properties of operations can be used to find products of a single digit factor by a multi-digit factor and products of two two-digit factors.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.4.11.1: Divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g. knowing that 8 x 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8).
M.4.11.2: Divide within 100, using strategies such as properties of operations.
M.4.11.3: Multiply within 100, using strategies such as properties of operations.
M.4.11.4: Multiply within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g. knowing that 8 x 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8).
M.4.11.5: Recall products of two one-digit numbers.
M.4.11.6: Name the first 10 multiples of each one-digit natural number.
Example: 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, 70.
M.4.11.7: Recall basic addition, subtraction, and multiplication facts.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Apply divisibility rules for 2, 5, and 10.
    Example: Recognizing that 32 is divisible by 2 because the digit in the ones place is even.
  • Apply basic multiplication facts.
  • Understand subtraction as an unknown
  • addend problem.
  • Recognize division as repeated subtraction, parts of a set, parts of a whole, or the inverse of multiplication.
  • Name the first 10 multiples of each one-digit natural number.
    Example: 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, 70.
  • Recognize multiplication as repeated addition, and division as repeated subtraction.
  • Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract.
  • Recall basic addition and subtraction facts.
  • Use repeated addition to solve problems with multiple addends.
  • Count forward in multiples from a given number.
    Examples: 3, 6, 9, 12; 4, 8, 12, 16.
  • Recall doubles addition facts.
  • Model written method for composing equations.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.4.11 Add and subtract one and two-digit numbers up to 49 with regrouping using concrete manipulatives and visual models.


Tags: array, divide, multiplicative comparison, multiply, operations, place value, word problems
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Comments

There are five lessons in this topic.

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Author: Hannah Bradley