ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Taxes and Smuggling - Prelude to Revolution/Crash Course US History #6

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Taxes and Smuggling - Prelude to Revolution/Crash Course US History #6

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/64579e78-54da-4270-9739-48c7d21d67b8/taxes-and-smuggling-prelude-to-revolution-crash-course-us-history-6/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students that the Revolution did not start on July 4, 1776. The Revolutionary War didn't start on July 4 either. The shooting started on April 19, 1775, at Lexington and/or Concord, MA. Or the shooting started with the Boston Massacre on March 5, 1770. At least we can pin down the Declaration of Independence to July 4, 1776. Except that most of the signers didn't sign until August 2. The point is that the beginning of the Revolution is very complex and hard to pin down. John will lead you through the bramble of taxes, royal decrees, acts of parliament, colonial responses, and various congresses. We'll start with the end of the Seven Years War, and the bill that the British ran up fighting the war. This led to taxes on colonial trade, which led to colonists demanding representation, which led to revolution. It all seems very complicated, but Crash Course will get you through it in about 12 minutes.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
4 ) Describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Interpreting the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States; separation of powers; federal system; elastic clause; the Bill of Rights; and the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments as key elements of the Constitution of the United States
•  Describing inadequacies of the Articles of Confederation
•  Distinguishing personalities, issues, ideologies, and compromises related to the Constitutional Convention and the ratification of the Constitution of the United States, including the role of the Federalist papers
•  Identifying factors leading to the development and establishment of political parties, including Alexander Hamilton's economic policies, conflicting views of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, George Washington's Farewell Address, and the election of 1800
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States and the factors that influenced its development.
  • Identify and analyze factors that have lead to the various interpretations of the Constitution and related documents.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • political system
  • elements
  • distinguishing
  • ideologies
  • conflicting
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The inadequacies of Articles of Confederation and how these lead to the writing of the Constitution.
  • Personalities, issues, ideologies, and compromises related to the Constitutional Convention and the ratification of the Constitution of the United States.
  • The purpose and effects of the Federalist Papers.
  • Details of the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States.
  • How to interpret the Preamble to the Constitution.
  • The purpose of the separation of powers and how this works in the U.S. federal system.
  • The meaning and purpose of the elastic clause.
  • The purpose of the Bill of Rights and the effects of these amendments.
  • Factors leading to the development and establishment of political parties, including Alexander Hamilton's economic policies, conflicting views of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, George Washington's Farewell Address, and the election of 1800.
  • The reasons for and effects of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Analyze and describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States by giving a verbal or written account with characteristics of the political system.
  • Interpret the Preamble of the Constitution, separation of powers, federal system; elastic clause, the Bill of Rights; and the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments by examining these parts.
  • Describe the inadequacies of the Articles of Confederation by giving a verbal or written account of the weaknesses.
  • Distinguish personalities, ideas, issues, ideologies and compromises related to the Constitutional by highlighting these differences.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The Constitution replaced a weak Articles of Confederation and provides the basis for governing the United States.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.4- Understand that the U.S. Constitution is our plan of government.
SS.AAS.10.4a - Define the amendments including the Bill of Rights.
SS.AAS.10.4b - Define the major provisions of the Constitution including the separation of powers, checks and balances, the three branches of government - executive, legislative, and judicial.
SS.AAS.10.4c - Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.


Tags: Alexander Hamilton, American Revolution, election of 1800, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/help/terms-of-use/#permitted
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
Comments

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**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

  This resource provided by:  
Author: Ginger Boyd