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The Market Revolution/Crash Course US History #12

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

The Market Revolution/Crash Course US History #12

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/9a33ae0c-2c2c-404f-9a28-5027528c8903/the-market-revolution-crash-course-us-history-12/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about the Market Revolution. In the first half of the 19th century, the way people lived and worked in the United States changed drastically. At play was the classic American struggle between the Jeffersonian ideal of individuals sustaining themselves on small farms vs. the Hamiltonian vision of an economy based on manufacturing and trade. In the early 19th century, new technologies in transportation and communication helped remake the economic system of the country. Railroads and telegraphs changed the way people moved goods and information around. The Market Revolution meant that people now went somewhere to work rather than working at home. Often, that somewhere was a factory where they worked for an hourly wage rather than getting paid for the volume of goods they manufactured. This shift in the way people work has repercussions in our daily lives right down to today. Watch as John teaches you how the Market Revolution sowed the seeds of change in the way Americans thought about the roles of women, slavery, and labor rights.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • interpretation
  • Ordinance
  • expansionism
  • Manifest Destiny
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The causes of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
  • The courses of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
  • The consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
  • Causes and effects of documents related to U.S. expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, and the Indian Removal Act Causes and effects of vital events and ideas related to expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Locate points on a map.
  • Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
  • Analyze primary sources relating to the United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
  • Analyze key events and ideas that influenced U.S. expansionism prior to the Civil War.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.7- Understand the concept of Manifest Destiny; identify and describe events of the U.S. expansion prior to the Civil War.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
9 ) Explain dynamics of economic nationalism during the Era of Good Feelings, including transportation systems, Henry Clay's American System, slavery and the emergence of the plantation system, and the beginning of industrialism in the Northeast. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Examples: Waltham-Lowell system, "old" immigration, changing technologies

Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Contrast the dynamics of economic nationalism during the Era of Good Feelings with the corresponding sectional divisions between parts of the U.S.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • dynamics
  • emergence
  • nationalism
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The influence of improved transportation systems on economic nationalism during the Era of Good Feelings.
  • The importance of Henry Clay's American System on the economics of this time period.
  • Causes and effects of the growth of slavery and the corresponding emergence of the plantation system.
  • Causes and effects of the beginning of industrialism in the Northeast.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use primary sources to analyze the dynamics of economic nationalism during the Era of Good Feelings.
  • Use maps to identify and trace internal improvements that were made during the Era of Good Feelings as a result of Henry Clay's American System.
  • Analyze primary resources to understand the causes for the growth of slavery and the corresponding emergence of the plantation system.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Economic nationalism during the years of the "Era of Good Feelings" corresponded to an increase in sectionalism in the United States.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.9- Define economic nationalism; identify internal improvements during the Era of Good Feelings including canals, national road, steamboat, and the cotton gin.


Tags: Era of Good Feelings, Louisiana Purchase, Texas Annexation, westward expansion
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/help/terms-of-use/#permitted
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
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Author: Ginger Boyd