ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Women in the 19th Century/Crash Course US History #16

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Women in the 19th Century/Crash Course US History #16

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/64ce26b6-3607-4374-8bff-860376f7fdf3/women-in-the-19th-century-crash-course-us-history-16/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green finally gets around to talking about some women's history. In the 19th Century, the United States was changing rapidly, as we noted in the recent Market Revolution and Reform Movements episodes. Things were also in a state of flux for women. The reform movements, which were in large part driven by women, gave these self-same women the idea that they could work on their own behalf, and radically improve the state of their own lives. So, while these women were working on prison reform, education reform, and abolition, they also started talking about equal rights, universal suffrage, temperance, and fair pay. Women like Susan B. Anthony, Carry Nation, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the Grimkes, and Lucretia Mott strove tirelessly to improve a lot of American women, and it worked, eventually. John will teach you about the Christian Temperance Union, the Seneca Falls Convention, the Declaration of Sentiments, and a whole bunch of other stuff that made life better for women.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
4 ) Describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Interpreting the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States; separation of powers; federal system; elastic clause; the Bill of Rights; and the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments as key elements of the Constitution of the United States
•  Describing inadequacies of the Articles of Confederation
•  Distinguishing personalities, issues, ideologies, and compromises related to the Constitutional Convention and the ratification of the Constitution of the United States, including the role of the Federalist papers
•  Identifying factors leading to the development and establishment of political parties, including Alexander Hamilton's economic policies, conflicting views of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, George Washington's Farewell Address, and the election of 1800
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States and the factors that influenced its development.
  • Identify and analyze factors that have lead to the various interpretations of the Constitution and related documents.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • political system
  • elements
  • distinguishing
  • ideologies
  • conflicting
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The inadequacies of Articles of Confederation and how these lead to the writing of the Constitution.
  • Personalities, issues, ideologies, and compromises related to the Constitutional Convention and the ratification of the Constitution of the United States.
  • The purpose and effects of the Federalist Papers.
  • Details of the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States.
  • How to interpret the Preamble to the Constitution.
  • The purpose of the separation of powers and how this works in the U.S. federal system.
  • The meaning and purpose of the elastic clause.
  • The purpose of the Bill of Rights and the effects of these amendments.
  • Factors leading to the development and establishment of political parties, including Alexander Hamilton's economic policies, conflicting views of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, George Washington's Farewell Address, and the election of 1800.
  • The reasons for and effects of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Analyze and describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States by giving a verbal or written account with characteristics of the political system.
  • Interpret the Preamble of the Constitution, separation of powers, federal system; elastic clause, the Bill of Rights; and the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments by examining these parts.
  • Describe the inadequacies of the Articles of Confederation by giving a verbal or written account of the weaknesses.
  • Distinguish personalities, ideas, issues, ideologies and compromises related to the Constitutional by highlighting these differences.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The Constitution replaced a weak Articles of Confederation and provides the basis for governing the United States.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.4- Understand that the U.S. Constitution is our plan of government.
SS.AAS.10.4a - Define the amendments including the Bill of Rights.
SS.AAS.10.4b - Define the major provisions of the Constitution including the separation of powers, checks and balances, the three branches of government - executive, legislative, and judicial.
SS.AAS.10.4c - Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • interpretation
  • Ordinance
  • expansionism
  • Manifest Destiny
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The causes of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
  • The courses of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
  • The consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
  • Causes and effects of documents related to U.S. expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, and the Indian Removal Act Causes and effects of vital events and ideas related to expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Locate points on a map.
  • Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
  • Analyze primary sources relating to the United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.
  • Analyze key events and ideas that influenced U.S. expansionism prior to the Civil War.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.7- Understand the concept of Manifest Destiny; identify and describe events of the U.S. expansion prior to the Civil War.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
11 ) Evaluate the impact of American social and political reform on the emergence of a distinct culture. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Explaining the impact of the Second Great Awakening on the emergence of a national identity
•  Explaining the emergence of uniquely American writers
Examples: James Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, Edgar Allen Poe

•  Explaining the influence of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Dorothea Lynde Dix, and Susan B. Anthony on the development of social reform movements prior to the Civil War
Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate social and political reforms before the Civil War and describe the impact of these, individually and collectively, on American social and political development during the time period and into current times.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • reform
  • culture
  • impact
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The impact of American social and political reform on the emergence of a distinct American culture.
  • The impact of the Second Great Awakening on the emergence of a national identity.
  • Emergence of uniquely American writers including James Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, and Edgar Allen Poe.
  • The influence of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Dorothea Lynde Dix, and Susan B. Anthony.
  • The development of social reform movements prior to the Civil War.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Evaluate the impact of American social and political reform.
  • Discuss the emergence of a distinct culture including the advantages, disadvantages, limitations, etc.
  • Compare the impact of the Second Great Awakening and other reform movements on the emergence of a national identity.
  • Describe the emergence of uniquely American writers.
  • Describe the influence of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Dorothea Lynde Dix, and Susan B. Anthony on American society.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were social and political reforms before the Civil War that impacted, individually and collectively, the American social and political development from the time period and into modern times.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.11- Recognize reform movements and reform leaders of the pre-Civil War Era.


Tags: Dorothea Dix, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, social reform movement
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Author: Ginger Boyd