ALEX Classroom Resource

  

The Election of 1860 and the Road to Disunion/Crash Course US History #18

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

The Election of 1860 and the Road to Disunion/Crash Course US History #18

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/c9bd54ba-b818-4f25-ba2e-28e1f199e4cb/the-election-of-1860-and-the-road-to-disunion-crash-course-us-history-18/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about the election of 1860. As you may remember from last week, things were not great at this time in US history. The tensions between the North and South were rising, ultimately due to the single issue of slavery. The North wanted to abolish slavery, and the South wanted to continue on with it. It seemed like a war was inevitable, and it turns out that it was. But first, the nation had to get through this election. You'll learn how the bloodshed in Kansas and the truly awful Kansas-Nebraska Act led directly to the decrease in popularity of Stephen Douglas, the splitting of the Democratic party, and the unlikely victory of a relatively inexperienced politician from Illinois, Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln's election would lead directly to the secession of several southern states and thus to the Civil War. John will teach you about all this, plus Dred Scott, Roger Taney, and John Brown.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
15 ) Compare congressional and presidential reconstruction plans, including African-American political participation. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Tracing economic changes in the post-Civil War period for whites and African Americans in the North and South, including the effectiveness of the Freedmen's Bureau
•  Describing social restructuring of the South, including Southern military districts, the role of carpetbaggers and scalawags, the creation of the black codes, and the Ku Klux Klan
•  Describing the Compromise of 1877
•  Summarizing post-Civil War constitutional amendments, including the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments
•  Explaining causes for the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson
•  Explaining the impact of the Jim Crow laws and Plessey versus Ferguson on the social and political structure of the New South after Reconstruction
•  Analyzing political and social motives that shaped the Constitution of Alabama of 1901 to determine their long-term effect on politics and economics in Alabama (Alabama)
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze and compare the short- and long-term impacts of the social, economic, and political realities of the
  • Reconstruction Era on the United States as a whole, regionally, and in Alabama.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • effectiveness
  • restructure
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Congressional and presidential reconstruction plans, including African-American political participation.
  • Economic changes in the post-Civil War period for whites and African Americans in the North and South, including the effectiveness of the Freedmen's Bureau.
  • Social restructuring of the South, including Southern military districts, the role of carpetbaggers and scalawags, the creation of the black codes, and the Ku Klux Klan.
  • The Compromise of 1877.
  • Post-Civil War constitutional amendments, including the
  • Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments.
  • The causes of the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson.
  • The impact of the Jim Crow laws and Plessy versus Ferguson on the social and Political structure of the South after Reconstruction.
  • Political and social motives that shaped the Constitution of Alabama of 1901 and their long-term effect on politics and economics in Alabama.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare congressional and presidential reconstruction plan.
  • Trace the economic changes in the post Civil War period for whites and African Americans in the North and South.
  • Describe the Compromise of 1877.
  • Summarize the post-Civil War constitutional amendments.
  • Explain the causes of the impeachment of Presidential Andrew Johnson.
  • Explain the impact of the Jim Crow laws and Plessey versus Ferguson on the social and political structure of the South after Reconstruction.
  • Analyze the political and social motives that shaped the Alabama Constitution of 1901 to determine the long term political and examining effects.
  • Analyze primary source documents relating to reconstruction plans, segregation, and the Constitution of Alabama of 1901.
  • Determine the effects of different reconstruction plans on a map.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were important social, economic, and political realities of the Reconstruction Era, as well as short- and long-term impacts of these realities on the United States as a whole, regionally, and in Alabama.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.15- Define reconstruction, scalawags, carpetbaggers, Black Codes, impeachment, and freedmen's Bureau; identify Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments; recognize social, political, and economic changes initiated by the policies of the Reconstruction.


Tags: carpetbaggers, Civil War, election of 1860, Ku Klux Klan, reconstruction, scalawags
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/help/terms-of-use/#permitted
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
Comments

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**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

  This resource provided by:  
Author: Ginger Boyd