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Progressive Presidents/Crash Course US History #29

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Progressive Presidents/Crash Course US History #29

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/5a8643c4-8bcb-47d7-a672-d4fa1c8ae635/progressive-presidents-crash-course-us-history-29/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about the Progressive Presidents. The presidents most associated with the Progressive Era are Theodore Roosevelt, William Taft, and Woodrow Wilson. During the times these guys held office, trusts were busted, national parks were founded, social programs were enacted, and tariffs were lowered. It wasn't all positive though, as their collective tenure also saw Latin America invaded A LOT, a split in the Republican party that resulted in a Bull Moose, all kinds of other international intervention, and the end of the Progressive Era saw the United States involved in World War.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
2 ) Evaluate social and political origins, accomplishments, and limitations of Progressivism. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Explaining the impact of the Populist Movement on the role of the federal government in American society
•  Assessing the impact of muckrakers on public opinion during the Progressive movement, including Upton Sinclair, Jacob A. Riis, and Ida M. Tarbell
Examples: women's suffrage, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, temperance movement

•  Explaining national legislation affecting the Progressive movement, including the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act
•  Determining the influence of the Niagara Movement, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Carter G. Woodson on the Progressive Era
•  Assessing the significance of the public education movement initiated by Horace Mann
•  Comparing the presidential leadership of Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson in obtaining passage of measures regarding trust-busting, the Hepburn Act, the Pure Food and Drug Act, the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Reserve Act, and conservation
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate the political, economic, and social origins, accomplishments, and limitations of the Progressive Era and determine the influence it has had on American society through the present.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • textual evidence
  • evaluate
  • cite
  • Progressivism
  • muckraker
  • trust
  • antitrust
  • suffrage
  • temperance movement
  • civil rights
  • trust-busting
  • conservation
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The social, economic, and political origins, accomplishments, and limitations of the Progressive.
  • The impact of the Populist Movement on the role of the federal government in American society.
  • The impact of muckrakers on public opinion during the Progressive movement, including Upton Sinclair, Jacob A. Riis, and Ida M. Tarbell.
  • The influence and impact of social movements, including: women's suffrage, temperance movement, and civil rights for African-Americans.
  • The influence of specific social groups and influential individuals on the Progressive Era, including: Ida B. Wells-Barnett, the Niagara Movement, the National *Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Carter G. Woodson.
  • National legislation affecting the Progressive movement, including the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act.
  • The significance of the public education movement initiated by Horace Mann.
  • The impact of the presidential leadership of Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson in obtaining passage of measures regarding trust-busting, the Hepburn Act, the Pure Food and Drug Act, the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Reserve Act, and conservation.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Effectively evaluate the complexities, origins, limitations, accomplishments and affects of social and political movements such as the Progressive and Populist Movements.
  • Evaluate the influence of prominent individuals and groups from specific historical time periods on public opinion, social and political movements, and national legislation.
  • Explain national legislation that was influence by and that affected social and political movements.
  • Assess the significance of the public education movement initiated by Horace Mann.
  • Compare the presidential leadership during specific historical periods.
  • Analyze primary and secondary historical sources.
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were political, economic, and social origins, accomplishments, and limitations of the Progressive Era and these have impacted American society through the present.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.2- Identify the goals of the Progressive movement; identify people and/or describe major events and developments in the United States during the Progressive movement.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
3 ) Explain the United States' changing role in the early twentieth century as a world power. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Describing causes of the Spanish-American War, including yellow journalism, the sinking of the Battleship USS Maine, and economic interests in Cuba
•  Identifying the role of the Rough Riders on the iconic status of President Theodore Roosevelt
•  Describing consequences of the Spanish-American War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1898, insurgency in the Philippines, and territorial expansion in the Pacific and Caribbean
•  Analyzing the involvement of the United States in the Hawaiian Islands for economic and imperialistic interests
•  Appraising Alabama's contributions to the United States between Reconstruction and World War I, including those of William Crawford Gorgas, Joseph Wheeler, and John Tyler Morgan (Alabama)
•  Evaluating the role of the Open Door policy and the Roosevelt Corollary on America's expanding economic and geographic interests
•  Comparing the executive leadership represented by William Howard Taft's Dollar Diplomacy, Theodore Roosevelt's Big Stick Diplomacy, and Woodrow Wilson's Moral Diplomacy
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze changes in the global role of the United States during the early 20th Century and explain the causes of these changes and the resulting consequences for the nation.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Spanish-American War
  • imperialism
  • annexation
  • global role
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The internal and external factors that resulted in changes in America's role as a world power during the early 20th Century. Factors that lead to the Spanish-American War and the consequences of the war.
  • Theodore Roosevelt's involvement in the Spanish-American War and its role in his popularity and involvement in politics.
  • Social, political, and economic causes for the United State's involvement in the Hawaiian Islands.
  • The contributions of Alabama and Alabamians to the United States between Reconstruction and World War I.
  • Consequences of political policies, such as the Open Door policy and the Roosevelt Corollary on American economic and geographic interests.
  • Policies and leadership of American presidents during the early 20th Century.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Describe the internal and external factors that result in changes in the development of a specific country during a specific time period and the consequences of these changes.
  • Evacuate factors that lead to war and the consequences of the war.
  • Discuss the effects of popularity on political power.
  • Analyze the social, political, and economic causes for the United State's involvement in other countries and regions.
  • Appraise the contributions of Alabama and Alabamians to the United States during specific historical periods.
  • Evaluate the consequences of political policies, such as the Open Door policy and the Roosevelt Corollary on American economic and geographic interests.
  • Compare the policies and leadership of influential political, economic, and social leaders.
  • Analyze primary and secondary sources.
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many causes and consequences of the changes in the United States' role as it became a global power during the early 20th Century.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.3- Identify the causes, major events, and key figures of the Spanish American War; understand the United States transition to becoming a world power following the Spanish-American War.
SS.AAS.11.3a - Define diplomacy, foreign policy, domestic policy, and imperialism.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the causes and events of the United States' military involvement in World War I in order to determine the long-term social, political, and economic impact on the United States.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • World War I
  • Treaty of Versailles
  • mobilization
  • imperialism
  • nationalism
  • militarism
  • nativism
  • fascist
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I.
  • Social and political changes and attitudes in the United States related to involvement in World War I, including: American neutrality, mobilization, economic changes, and political changes.
  • The role of imperialism, militarism, nationalism, nativism, and the alliance system in World War I.
  • Geographical and political boundaries of Europe and the Middle East, pre- and post-World War I.
  • Controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations.
  • Short- and long-term effects of the Treaty of Versailles.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Explain the changing role of the United States during specific historical periods and in relationship to specific historical events.
  • Describe the effects of political and social movements and ideologies.
  • Analyze the social and political causes, events, and impact of specific historical events.
  • Identify geographical and political changes related to specific historical events.
  • Analyze controversies related to political policies, plans, and agreements.
  • Analyze primary and secondary sources.
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many causes and effects of the United States' military involvement in World War I and these had significant social, political, and economic impact on the United States.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.4- Define militarism, nationalism, imperialism, and alliances; understand that the United States entry into World War I had a significant impact on the outcome of the war; identify the consequences of World War I.


Tags: presidents, Progressivism, Roosevelt, Taft, Treaty of Versailles, WEB Du Bois, Wilson, World War I
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Author: Ginger Boyd