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Archaeology Adventures: Early Alabama History (Full Episode)

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Archaeology Adventures: Early Alabama History (Full Episode)

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/2ea3cc35-603f-46a1-9e1c-b493bba82503/archaeology-adventures-early-alabama-history/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, three young kids venture outside their 2-D animated world to learn about early Alabama history for their upcoming school report. Aided by their hyper-intelligent robotic friend Roto and a magical portal, they visit some of Alabama’s historic sites to learn about Native American societies, early settlers, and the beginning of Alabama’s statehood. With the help of local archaeologists and historians, they just might make it back home in time to get to school and turn in their report!

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 2
Living and Working Together in State and Nation
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

Unpacked Content
Strand: History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in State and Nation
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Reconstruct a past event using various primary sources, including calendars and timelines.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • primary sources
  • calendars
  • timelines
  • reconstructing
  • past
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How to use a calendar.
  • How to interpret a timeline.
  • Vocabulary: primary sources, calendar, timeline, past, historical letter, artifacts
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Read a calendar.
  • Create and use a timeline.
  • Analyze a historical document.
  • Utilize maps, photographs, and other visual historic resources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Primary sources play an important role in reconstructing the past.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.2.3- Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
1 ) Compare historical and current economic, political, and geographic information about Alabama on thematic maps, including weather and climate, physical-relief, waterway, transportation, political, economic development, land-use, and population maps.

•  Describing types of migrations as they affect the environment, agriculture, economic development, and population changes in Alabama
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
Use thematic maps to identify:
  • historical and current economic information
  • political information
  • geographic information
  • weather and climate
  • physical features
  • waterways
  • migration patterns of people
  • transportation
  • land use
  • population
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • agriculture
  • economic development
  • physical-relief maps
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Many events can impact the population, economic development, and land use in an area.
Skills:
The students are able to:
  • Analyze characteristics of Alabama using physical and thematic maps.
  • Describe the relationship between human migration and population.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Events can impact the population, economic development, and land use in an area.
  • The climate and weather of our state impacts the population, economic development, and land use.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.1- Identify historical and current economic, political, and geographic information about Alabama.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Locate on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims.
  • Trace on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa.
  • Explain reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • settlement
  • European exploration
  • culture
  • expansion
  • trade (barter)
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The location, purpose, and importance of European settlements including Fort Conde, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims in early Alabama.
  • The routes taken by early explorers including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa.
  • Reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture.
Skills:
The students will be able to:
  • Explain the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.
  • Locate on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims.
  • Trace on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were specific reasons Europeans began exploring and settling in Alabama and this impacted existing settlements in Alabama.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.2- Using maps, demonstrate an understanding that people from Europe explored and settled in Alabama.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
3 ) Explain the social, political, and economic impact of the War of 1812, including battles and significant leaders of the Creek War, on Alabama.

Examples: social—adoption of European culture by American Indians, opening of Alabama land for settlement

political—forced relocation of American Indians, labeling of Andrew Jackson as a hero and propelling him toward Presidency

economic—acquisition of tribal land in Alabama by the United States

•  Explaining the impact of the Trail of Tears on Alabama American Indians' lives, rights, and territories
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain the social, political, and economic impact of the War of 1812, including battles and significant leaders of the Creek War, on Alabama.
  • Explain the impact of the Trail of Tears on Alabama American Indians' lives, rights, and territories.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • culture
  • settlement
  • relocation
  • acquisition
  • territory
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Key battles of the War of 1812 that took place in Alabama including the Battle of Burnt Corn Creek, Fort Mims, the Canoe Fight, and the Battle of Horseshoe Bend.
  • Key leaders of the Creek War including Andrew Jackson, William Weatherford, Tecumseh, and Alexander McGillivray.
  • Reasons for and the impact of the Trail of Tears in Alabama.
Skills:
The students will:
  • Analyze the social impact of the War of 1812 including the adoption of European culture by American Indians, opening of Alabama land for settlement.
  • Analyze the political impact of the War of 1812 including the forced relocation of American Indians.
  • Formulate an opinion of whether or not Andrew Jackson was a hero and will defend that opinion.
  • Analyze the economic impact of the War of 1812 including acquisition of tribal land in Alabama by the United States.
  • Analyze the impact of the Trail of Tears on Alabama's American Indians' lives, rights, and territories.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The political, economic, and social decisions made by Alabama's early settlers impacted the lives of American Indians living in the territory.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.3- Explain the impact of the Trail of Tears on Alabama American Indians' lives, rights, and territories.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
5 ) Describe Alabama's entry into statehood and establishment of its three branches of government and the constitutions.

•  Explaining political and geographic reasons for changes in location of Alabama's state capital
•  Recognizing roles of prominent political leaders during early statehood in Alabama, including William Wyatt Bibb, Thomas Bibb, Israel Pickens, William Rufus King, and John W. Walker
Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe Alabama's entry into statehood as well as identify and explain the role of its three branches of government and the constitutions.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • legislative
  • executive
  • judicial
  • constitution
  • senate
  • congress
  • house of representatives
  • governor
  • checks and balances
  • capital
  • capitol
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Alabama has had six different constitutions. Alabama has three branches of Government: Executive, Legislative, Judicial.
  • The reasons why Alabama has had five different capitals.
  • The roles of prominent political leaders during early statehood in Alabama, including William Wyatt Bibb, Thomas Bibb, Israel Pickens, William Rufus King, and John W. Walker.
  • What the U.S. Constitution and the Northwest Territory require of a territory to become a state.
  • The history of early settlements in Alabama and the cession of Indian lands.
  • What it means to have a republican form of government.
Skills:
The students are able to:
  • Analyze Alabama's entry into statehood.
  • Identify and differentiate the roles of the three branches of government.
  • Compare and contrast Alabama's constitutions.
  • Explain political and geographic reasons for changes in location of Alabama's state capital.
  • Recognize roles of prominent political leaders during early statehood in Alabama, including William Wyatt Bibb, Thomas Bibb, Israel Pickens, William Rufus King, and John W. Walker.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Many prominent people were involved in Alabama's entry into statehood and that our government was designed in a way that allowed a system of checks and balances to be in place.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.5- Identify the location of the state capital; recognize that Alabama is a state with three branches of government.


Tags: Alabama history, American Indians, Cahawba, constitution, government, Moundville, primary sources
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
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Author: Ginger Boyd