ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Follow the Trail: Early Roads/Alabama Highways & Byways

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Follow the Trail: Early Roads/Alabama Highways & Byways

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/highways-follow-the-trail/follow-the-trail-early-roads-video-alabama-highways-and-byways/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, students learn that the earliest forms of transportation in Alabama involved trails followed by animals and Native Americans. These trails lead to water, and Alabama rivers served as a gathering place for many early Indian settlements. It is along the paths of Native American trails that the first highway systems were developed.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
10 ) Analyze key ideas of Jacksonian Democracy for their impact on political participation, political parties, and constitutional government. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Explaining the spoils system, nullification, extension of voting rights, the Indian Removal Act, and the common man ideal
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the concepts and ideals of Jacksonian Democracy and evaluate the social and political impact they have had on the United States.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Analyze
  • Jacksonian Democracy
  • ideals
  • concepts
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Key ideas of Jacksonian Democracy and their impact on political participation, political parties, and constitutional government.
  • Reasons for and impact of extension of voting rights during the Jackson presidency.
  • Reasons for, controversy surrounding, and impact of the Indian Removal Act the common man ideal.
  • Vocabulary: spoils system, nullification
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use primary sources and graphic organizers to analyze and examine key ideas of Jacksonian Democracy.
  • Utilize maps for historical understandings.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are important concepts and ideals related to Jacksonian Democracy and these have had an impact on the United States.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.10- Recognize the positive and negative ideas of Jacksonian Democracy and identify examples, including the expansion of voting rights.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
13 ) Summarize major legislation and court decisions from 1800 to 1861 that led to increasing sectionalism, including the Missouri Compromise of 1820, the Compromise of 1850, the Fugitive Slave Acts, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott decision. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing Alabama's role in the developing sectionalism of the United States from 1819 to 1861, including participation in slavery, secession, the Indian War, and reliance on cotton (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Westward Expansion from 1803 to 1861 to determine its effect on sectionalism, including the Louisiana Purchase, Texas Annexation, and the Mexican Cession
•  Describing tariff debates and the nullification crisis between 1800 and 1861
•  Analyzing the formation of the Republican Party for its impact on the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the causes for increasing sectionalism in the United States prior to the Civil War, including legislative, judicial, social, political, and economic causes.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • legislation
  • act
  • secession
  • annexation
  • cession
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Major legislation and court decisions from 1800 to 1861 that led to increasing sectionalism, including the Missouri Compromise of 1820, the Compromise of 1850, the Fugitive Slave Acts, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott decision.
  • Alabama's role in the developing sectionalism of the United States from 1819 to 1861, including participation in slavery, secession, the Indian War, and reliance on cotton.
  • Westward Expansion from 1803 to 1861 including the Louisiana Purchase, Texas Annexation, and the Mexican Cession.
  • Tariff debates and the nullification crisis between 1800 and 1861.
  • The formation of the Republican Party for its impact on the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States.
Skills:
Students are able to
  • Summarize major legislation and court decision from 1800 to 1861 that led to increasing sectionalism.
  • Describe Alabama's role in the developing sectionalism of the United States from 1819 to 1861, including the participation in slavery, secession, the Indian War, and reliance on cotton.
  • Analyzing the Westward Expansion from 1803 to 1861 to determine its effect on sectionalism.
  • Describe tariff debates and the nullification crisis between 1800 and 1861.
  • Analyze the formation of the Republican party for its impact on the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln.
  • Explain the significance of the 36'30 parallel in relation to the Missouri Compromise, Sectionalism, and Manifest Destiny.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were important events that led to increased sectionalism, including legislation and court decisions, the role of new land acquisition and the spread of slavery into new territories, and these issues that led to the formation of the Republican Party.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.13- Define sectionalism; recognize major legislation and court decisions that increased sectional tensions prior to the Civil War.


Tags: Indian Removal Act, nullification, spoils system, Westward Expansion
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/help/terms-of-use/
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
Comments

PBSLearningMedia is free for teachers.  Teachers need to create a free account to access all available resources. 

  This resource provided by:  
Author: Ginger Boyd