ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Peg+Cat/Eid-Al-Adha Adventure

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Peg+Cat/Eid-Al-Adha Adventure

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/islam17.soc.peg.adha/pegcat-eid-al-adha-adventure/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, students will join Peg+Cat as they learn about the Muslim holiday Eid-Al-Adha from their friends Yasmina and Amir. In addition to exploring how Muslims celebrate the holiday, students also explore the mathematical concepts of less than (<) and more than (>), fractions, and how to create equal amounts.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: K
Living and Working Together in Family and Community
6 ) Compare cultural similarities and differences in individuals, families, and communities.

Examples: celebrations, food, traditions

Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography, History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe a tradition of their culture including the food, clothing, activities, etc. that are part of it.
  • Identify the similarities and differences among various cultural traditions.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • compare
  • contrast
  • culture
  • celebration
  • tradition
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Individuals, families, and communities mark special days or events in a variety of ways.
  • Cultures are celebrated in different ways.
  • Cultures follow a variety of traditions.
  • Vocabulary: celebration, tradition, culture
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify celebrations and traditions within their culture.
  • Recognize celebrations and traditions of other cultures.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are cultural similarities and differences among individuals, families, and communities.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.K.6- With prompting and support, discuss and recognize the fact that individuals, families, and communities have similarities and differences in culture including what they eat, choose to celebrate, and traditions they follow.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: K
Living and Working Together in Family and Community
11 ) Identify symbols, customs, famous individuals, and celebrations representative of our state and nation. (Alabama)

Examples: symbols—United States flag, Alabama flag, bald eagle (Alabama)

customs—pledging allegiance to the United States flag, singing "The Star-Spangled Banner"

individuals—George Washington; Abraham Lincoln; Squanto; Martin Luther King, Jr.

celebrations—Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Veterans Day

Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Recognize our country's important symbols and customs.
  • Identify famous national and state individuals.
  • Recognize the "Pledge of Allegiance" and "The Star Spangled Banner" and demonstrate appropriate etiquette for each.
  • Recognize the importance of various national and state holidays.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • symbol
  • custom
  • famous
  • celebrations
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Our state and nation has certain symbols that represent it and its people.
  • There are certain customs common to citizens of our state and nation.
  • There are celebrations common to the citizens of our state and nation.
  • There are certain individuals who are widely recognized as representatives of our state and nation.
  • Vocabulary: symbol, custom, celebrate, celebration, represent, representative, state, nation, Alabama, United States, pledge, allegiance
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify various symbols of our state and nation, including the American flag, Alabama flag, bald eagle, etc.
  • Identify various customs of our state and nation, including reciting the "Pledge of Allegiance," singing the "Star Spangled Banner," etc.
  • Identify various famous individuals of our state and nation, including George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., etc.
  • Identify various celebrations of our state and nation, including The Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, etc.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are certain symbols, customs, celebrations, and famous individuals recognized by most citizens of our state and nation.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.K.11- Identify and recognize the symbols, customs, individuals, and celebrations for our state and nation.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 2
Living and Working Together in State and Nation
2 ) Identify national historical figures and celebrations that exemplify fundamental democratic values, including equality, justice, and responsibility for the common good.

•  Recognizing our country's founding fathers, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Patrick Henry, John Adams, John Hancock, and James Madison
•  Recognizing historical female figures, including Abigail Adams, Dolley Madison, Harriet Tubman, and Harriet Beecher Stowe
•  Describing the significance of national holidays, including the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Presidents' Day; Memorial Day; the Fourth of July; Veterans Day; and Thanksgiving Day
•  Describing the history of American symbols and monuments
Examples: Liberty Bell, Statue of Liberty, bald eagle, United States flag, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial

Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Living and Working Together in State and Nation
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify national historic figures, including the founding fathers and other historic male and female American's, and relate them to the democratic values each exemplifies.
  • Describe national celebrations, including their significance and democratic values associated with each.
  • Identify American symbols and monuments and describe the history and significance of each.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • historic figures (male and female)
  • celebrations
  • exemplify
  • democratic values
  • recognize
  • founding fathers
  • significance
  • national holidays
  • American symbols
  • monuments
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Fundamental democratic values including equality, justice, and responsibility for the common good.
  • The names and significance of national historic figures, both male and female.
  • The significance of national holidays and the relationship of each to democratic values.
  • The history and significance of American symbols and monuments.
  • Vocabulary: democratic values, equality, justice, responsibility, common good, founding father, national holiday, American symbol, monument
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify national historic figures and celebrations.
  • Identify the ways historic figures and celebrations exemplify fundamental democratic values.
  • Recognize our country's founding fathers and other historic male figures.
  • Recognize historic female figures.
  • Describe national holidays, including the significance of each and the democratic values associated with each.
  • Identify American symbols and monuments and describe the history and significance of each.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There is an importance and impact of national historic figures and celebrations.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.2.2- Describe the significant national holidays, including the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Presidents' Day; Memorial Day; the Fourth of July; Veterans Day; and Thanksgiving Day.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: K
17. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common to see which object has "more of" or "less of" the attribute and describe the difference.

Example: Directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as "taller" or "shorter."
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use direct comparisons of physical objects to determine and explain which object has more of or less of the attribute.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Attribute
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to describe similarities and differences in objects.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Directly compare two objects and explain which object has more of or less of the attribute.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • objects and geometric figures have measurable attributes that allow them to be compared.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.K.17.1: Use vocabulary related to length and weight.
Example: longer, shorter, heavier, lighter.
M.K.17.2: Identify objects by length and weight.
Example: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
M.K.17.3: Sort objects according to measurable attributes.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Notice same/different and some/all.
  • Begin to name and match colors, sizes, and shapes.
  • Enjoy playing with all kinds of objects.
  • Point to matching or similar objects.
  • Understand that words can label sameness and differences.
  • Understand that some have more, and some have less.
  • Sort objects based on shape or color.
  • Name and match primary colors.
  • Sort objects on the basis of both color and shape.
  • Sort a variety of objects in a group that have one thing in common.
  • Recognize and sort familiar objects with the same color, shape, or size.
  • Understand the concept of same shape and size.
  • Understand the concept of smallest and shortest.
  • Understand the concept of light and heavy.
  • Understand the concept long and short.
  • Classify common objects according to height (tall/short).
  • Classify common objects according to length (long/short).
  • Classify common objects according to weight (heavy/light).
  • Classify common objects according to size (big/small).
  • Communicate long, short, heavy, light, big, small.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.K.16 Classify objects according to attributes (e.g., big/small, heavy/light, tall/short).


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 2
9. Compare two three-digit numbers based on the value of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and < and orally with the words "is greater than," "is equal to," and "is less than."
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • use place value terminology and concepts to explain and justify the placement of <, =, > to compare two 3-digit numbers and create true equalities and inequalities.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Equalities
  • Inequalities
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to compare 3-digit numbers using the terminology "greater than," "equal to," and "less than".
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • compare 3-digit numbers using place value concepts.
  • justify their reasoning as they compare numbers.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • the three digits of a 3-digit number represent groups of hundreds, tens, and ones.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.2.9.1: Define greater than, less than and equal to.
M.2.9.2: Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.
M.2.9.3: Arrange two-digit numbers in order from greatest to least or least to greatest.
M.2.9.4: Identify zero as a place holder in two-digit and three-digit numbers.
M.2.9.5: Model using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons of two two-digit numbers.
M.2.9.6: Select numbers on a number line that are more than, less than or equal to a specified number.
M.2.9.7: Match the words greater than, equal to and less than to the symbols >, =, and <.
M.2.9.8: Determine the value of the digits in the ones and tens place.
M.2.9.9: Identify sets with more, less or equal objects.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Understand amount words, such as more, less, and another.
  • Become more interested in the concept of some and all.
  • Be interested in who has more or less.
  • Understand the concept of "less than" "more than".
  • Mimic counting by ones.
  • Recognize numbers from one to 100.
  • Become interested in how many objects she/he has.
  • Understand the concept of size and amount.
  • Given a set number of objects one through ten, answer the question "how many?"
  • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many".
  • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture, a drawing or objects.
  • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group.
  • Count objects one-by-one using only one number per object.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.2.9 Using vocalization, sign language, augmentative communication, or assistive technology, compare sets of objects and numbers using appropriate vocabulary (greater than, less than, equal to; limited to thirty objects in a group).


Tags: cultural similarities and differences, EidAlAdha, greater than, less than, Muslim holiday
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Author: Ginger Boyd