ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Real-World Ratio and Rate Reasoning: How to Power the Skate Park

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Real-World Ratio and Rate Reasoning: How to Power the Skate Park

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/mwnet-math-rp-solpow/real-world-ratio-and-rate-reasoning-how-to-power-the-skate-park/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Interactive/Game

Overview:

The CyberSquad works with an area to figure out how to power a skate park using solar panels in this interactive from WNET. In the accompanying classroom activity, students view and analyze a series of video clips from Cyberchase and complete an activity using area and ratio. Students take what they’ve learned and put it to the test by designing their own solar power dream house. This resource is part of the Math at the Core: Middle School Collection.

Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 6
1. Use appropriate notations [a/b, a to b, a:b] to represent a proportional relationship between quantities and use ratio language to describe the relationship between quantities.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students: Given contextual or mathematical situations involving multiplicative comparisons.
  • Communicate the relationship of two or more quantities using ratio language.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Ratio
  • Ratio Language
  • Part-to-Part
  • Part-to-Whole
  • Attributes
  • Quantity
  • Measures
  • Fraction
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Characteristics of additive situations.
  • Characteristics of multiplicative situations
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare and contrast additive vs. multiplicative contextual situations.
  • Identify all ratios and describe them using "For every…, there are…"
  • Identify a ratio as a part-to-part or a part-to whole comparison.
  • Represent multiplicative comparisons in ratio notation and language (e.g., using words such as "out of" or "to" before using the symbolic notation of the colon and then the fraction bar. for example, 3 out of 7, 3 to 5, 6:7 and then 4/5).
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • In a multiplicative comparison situation one quantity changes at a constant rate with respect to a second related quantity. -Each ratio when expressed in forms: ie 10/5, 10:5 and/or 10 to 5 can be simplified to equivalent ratios, -Explain the relationships and differences between fractions and ratios.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.6.1.1: Define quantity, fraction, and ratio.
M.6.1.2: Identify the units or quantities being compared.
Example: Read 2/3 as 2 out of 3.
M.6.1.3: Write a ratio in appropriate notation;[a/b, a to b, a:b].
M.6.1.4: Draw a model of a given ratio or fraction.
M.6.1.5: Identify the numerator and denominator of a fraction.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size.
  • Addition and subtraction of fractions as joining and separating parts referring to the same whole.
  • Label numerator, denominator, and fraction bar.
  • Recognize fraction 1 as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.6.1 Demonstrate a simple ratio relationship using ratio notation given a real-world problem.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 6
3. Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve mathematical and real-world problems (including but not limited to percent, measurement conversion, and equivalent ratios) using a variety of models, including tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number lines, and equations.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
Given contextual or mathematical situations involving ratio and rate (including those involving unit pricing, constant speed, and measurement conversions),
  • Represent the situations using a variety of strategies (tables of equivalent ratios, changing to unit rate, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, equations, and plots on coordinate planes) in order to solve problems, find missing values on tables and interpret relationships and results.
  • Change given rates to unit rates in order to find and justify solutions to problems.
Given contextual or mathematical situations involving percents,
  • Understand the relationship between ratios, fractions, decimals and percents.
  • Interpret the percent as rate per 100.
  • Solve problems and justify solutions when finding the whole, given a part and the percent.
  • Solve problems and justify solutions when finding the part, given the whole and the percent.
  • Solve problems and justify solutions when finding percent, given the whole and the part.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Rate
  • Ratio
  • Rate reasoning
  • Ratio reasoning
  • Transform units
  • Quantities
  • Ratio Tables
  • Double Number Line Diagram
  • Percents
  • Coordinate Plane
  • Ordered Pairs
  • Quadrant I
  • Tape Diagrams
  • Unit Rate
  • Constant Speed
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Strategies for representing contexts involving rates and ratios including. tables of equivalent ratios, changing to unit rate, tape diagrams, double number lines, equations, and plots on coordinate planes.
  • Strategies for finding equivalent ratios,
  • Strategies for using ratio reasoning to convert measurement units.
  • Strategies to recognize that a conversion factor is a fraction equal to 1 since the quantity described in the numerator and denominator is the same.
  • Strategies for converting between fractions, decimals and percents.
  • Strategies for finding the whole when given the part and percent in a mathematical and contextual situation.
  • Strategies for finding the part, given the whole and the percent in mathematical and contextual situation.
  • Strategies for finding the percent, given the whole and the part in mathematical and contextual situation.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Represent ratio and rate situations using a variety of strategies (e.g., tables of equivalent ratios, changing to unit rate, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, equations, and plots on coordinate planes).
  • Use ratio, rates, and multiplicative reasoning to explain connections among representations and justify solutions in various contexts, including measurement, prices and geometry.
  • Understand the multiplicative relationship between ratio comparisons in a table by writing an equation.
  • Plot ratios as ordered pairs.
  • Solve and justify solutions for rate problems including unit pricing, constant speed, measurement conversions, and situations involving percents.
  • Solve problems and justify solutions when finding the whole given a part and the percent.
  • Model using an equivalent fraction and decimal to percents.
  • Use ratio reasoning, multiplication, and division to transform and interpret measurements.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • A unit rate is a ratio (a:b) of two measurements in which b is one.
  • A symbolic representation of relevant features of a real-world problem can provide for resolution of the problem and interpretation of the situation.
  • When computing with quantities the transformation and interpretation of the resulting unit is dependent on the particular operation performed.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.6.3.1: Define ratio, rate, proportion, percent, equivalent, input, output, ordered pairs, diagram, unit rate, and table.
M.6.3.2: Create a ratio or proportion from a given word problem, diagram, table, or equation.
M.6.3.3: Calculate unit rate or rate by using ratios or proportions with or without a calculator.
M.6.3.4: Restate real-world problems or mathematical problems.
M.6.3.5: Construct a graph from a set of ordered pairs given in the table of equivalent ratios.
M.6.3.6: Calculate missing input and/or output values in a table with or without a calculator.
M.6.3.7: Draw and label a table of equivalent ratios from given information.
M.6.3.8: Identify the parts of a table of equivalent ratios (input, output, etc.).
M.6.3.9: Compute the unit rate, unit price, and constant speed with or without a calculator.
M.6.3.10: Create a proportion or ratio from a given word problem.
M.6.3.11: Identify the two units being compared.
M.6.3.12: Define percent.
M.6.3.13: Calculate a proportion for missing information with or without a calculator.
M.6.3.14: Identify a proportion from given information.
M.6.3.15: Solve a proportion using part over whole equals percent over 100 with or without a calculator.
M.6.3.16: Form a ratio.
M.6.3.17: Convert like measurement units within a given system with or without a calculator. (Example: 120 min = 2 hrs).
M.6.3.18: Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units, including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz; l, ml; and hr, min, sec.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Recognize arithmetic patterns (including geometric patterns or patterns in the addition table or multiplication table).
    Examples: Continued Geometric Pattern by drawing the next three shapes.
  • Complete the numerical pattern for the following chart when given the rule, "Input + 5 = Output".
  • Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole.
  • Solve word problems involving multiplication of a fraction by a whole number, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem.
  • Recognize key terms to solve word problems.
    Examples: times, every, at this rate, each, per, equal/equally, in all, total.
  • Recall basic multiplication facts.
  • Recognize equivalent forms of fractions and decimals.
  • Recognize a fraction as a number on the number line.
  • Label numerator, denominator, and fraction bar.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.6.1 Demonstrate a simple ratio relationship using ratio notation given a real-world problem.


Tags: convert, dividing, equivalent ratios, measurement, multiplying, ratio, ratio relationship, tables
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Author: Hannah Bradley