ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Who Rules

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Who Rules

URL:

https://www.icivics.org/teachers/lesson-plans/who-rules?referer=node/10467&page_title=Foundations%20of%20Government

Content Source:

Other
iCivics
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

In this lesson from iCivics, students learn about the different forms of government that exist, including democracy, autocracy, oligarchy, and others. They compare and contrast these forms, and they look at real-life examples in the world today.  

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Civics
3 ) Compare the government of the United States with other governmental systems, including monarchy, limited monarchy, oligarchy, dictatorship, theocracy, and pure democracy.

Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Compare and Contrast other forms of government with the U.S. government focusing on who has the power and how power is acquired/achieved.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • power
  • federalism
  • republic
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The characteristics of the various forms of government found around the world including Federal Republic (representative democracy), Monarchy (absolute monarchy), Limited monarchy (constitutional monarchy), Oligarchy, Dictatorship, Theocracy, and Pure democracy (direct democracy).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Interpret primary source documents.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The system of government of the United States can be compared to other forms of government in the world.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.7.3- Describe the basic ideals of American democracy, including natural rights, basic freedoms, and democratic representation; identify characteristics of other government systems including, monarchy, dictatorship, and democracy.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 12
United States Government
1 ) Explain historical and philosophical origins that shaped the government of the United States, including the Magna Carta, the Petition of Rights, the English Bill of Rights, the Mayflower Compact, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and the influence of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean-Jaques Rousseau, and the Great Awakening.

•  Comparing characteristics of limited and unlimited governments throughout the world, including constitutional, authoritarian, and totalitarian governments
Examples: constitutional—United States

authoritarian—Iran

totalitarian—North Korea

Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Government
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify key philosophers, including Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean Jaques Rousseau, connecting them to their contribution to shaping constitutional democracy.
  • Identify key documents, including Magna Carta, Petition of Rights, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, and the Virginia Declaration of Rights, connecting them to their contribution to shaping constitutional democracy.
  • Identify how the Great Awakening shaped thinking about constitutional democracy.
  • Differentiate between a given country's form of government to that of the United States.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • state of nature
  • social contract theory
  • constitutional
  • authoritarian
  • totalitarian
  • compact
  • government
  • democracy
  • right
  • Enlightenment
  • rule of law
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Key political philosophers and events that influenced the creation of the American government.
  • Key political documents that influenced the creation of the American government.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Interpret primary documents distinguishing the impact of the document's central idea on formation of American government.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Significant key philosophers, events, and documents shaped the concepts of American government and how these concepts differ from other forms of government.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.USG.AAS.12.1- Define government; contrast limited government and unlimited government; recognize documents and individuals who helped shape the government of the United States.
SS.USG.AAS.12.1a- Identify key philosophers, including Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean Jacques Rousseau.
SS.USG.AAS.12.1b - Identify key documents, including Magna Carta, Petition of Rights, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, and the Virginia Declaration of Rights.
SS.USG.AAS.12.1c -


Tags: comparing government systems, limited and unlimited governments
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Author: Ginger Boyd