ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Limiting Government

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Limiting Government

URL:

https://www.icivics.org/teachers/lesson-plans/limiting-government?referer=node/10467&page_title=Foundations%20of%20Government

Content Source:

Other
iCivics
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

In this lesson from iCivics, students learn what keeps the government from having too much power. The lesson outlines five basic limits on government. Students analyze the true story of former Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori, in which many of those limits disappeared, and they evaluate fictional cases of governments with limits missing. The concepts in this lesson prepare students to understand why the U.S. Constitution is structured the way it is.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Civics
3 ) Compare the government of the United States with other governmental systems, including monarchy, limited monarchy, oligarchy, dictatorship, theocracy, and pure democracy.

Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Compare and Contrast other forms of government with the U.S. government focusing on who has the power and how power is acquired/achieved.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • power
  • federalism
  • republic
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The characteristics of the various forms of government found around the world including Federal Republic (representative democracy), Monarchy (absolute monarchy), Limited monarchy (constitutional monarchy), Oligarchy, Dictatorship, Theocracy, and Pure democracy (direct democracy).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Interpret primary source documents.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The system of government of the United States can be compared to other forms of government in the world.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.7.3- Describe the basic ideals of American democracy, including natural rights, basic freedoms, and democratic representation; identify characteristics of other government systems including, monarchy, dictatorship, and democracy.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Civics
6 ) Explain the importance of juvenile, adult, civil, and criminal laws within the judicial system of the United States.

•  Explaining rights of citizens as guaranteed by the Bill of Rights under the Constitution of the United States
•  Explaining what is meant by the term rule of law
•  Justifying consequences of committing a civil or criminal offense
•  Contrasting juvenile and adult laws at local, state, and federal levels (Alabama)
Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Differentiate between juvenile and adult laws, as well as between civil and criminal laws. Identify the protections given in the U.S. Bill of Rights.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • juvenile
  • civil law
  • criminal law
  • rights
  • Bill of Rights
  • rule of law
  • state
  • federal
  • local
  • court
  • offense
  • felony
  • misdemeanor
  • jail
  • prison
  • juvenile detention center
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The similarities and differences between civil and criminal law.
  • The structure of the juvenile court system.
  • The rights and freedoms guaranteed in the Bill of Rights.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use primary source documents to justify the actions of courts.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Laws are different for adults and juveniles and that there are separate civil and criminal laws and courts.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.7.6- Identify the basic rights under the Bill of Rights; recognize how government protects individual rights; recognize that citizens have a responsibility to follow laws and that there are consequences for breaking laws.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Civics
10 ) Describe individual and civic responsibilities of citizens of the United States.

Examples: individual—respect for rights of others, self-discipline, negotiation, compromise, fiscal responsibility

civic—respect for law, patriotism, participation in political process, fiscal responsibility

•  Differentiating rights, privileges, duties, and responsibilities between citizens and noncitizens
•  Explaining how United States' citizenship is acquired by immigrants
•  Explaining character traits that are beneficial to individuals and society
Examples: honesty, courage, compassion, civility, loyalty

Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the rights, duties, and responsibilities of U.S. citizens, as well as paths to citizenship.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • responsibilities
  • duties
  • rights
  • privileges
  • citizen
  • alien
  • immigrants
  • naturalization
  • character
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The distinction between right, duties and responsibilities. There is a way for immigrants to become a citizen.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Cite primary source documents to provide evidence that an idea is a right guaranteed to citizens.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are rights, duties, responsibilities, and privileges of U.S. citizenship.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.7.10- Demonstrate that individuals have a responsibility to be good citizens and community members; identify the legal definition of a United States citizen and non-citizen.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Civics
12 ) Describe how the United States can be improved by individual and group participation in civic and community activities.

•  Identifying options for civic and community action
Examples: investigating the feasibility of a specific solution to a traffic problem, developing a plan for construction of a subdivision, using maps to make and justify decisions about best locations for public facilities

•  Determining ways to participate in the political process
Examples: voting, running for office, serving on a jury, writing letters, being involved in political parties and political campaigns

Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain how participating in civic and community activities improves life in our community, state, and country.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • civic
  • community
  • political process
  • political participation
  • political parties
  • campaigns
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Individual citizens and community groups can improve their community by actively participating in the political process. Examples of participating in the political process include voting; running for office; writing letters to office holders; being involved in political parties and political campaigns.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • List ways to actively participate in the political process and in their community.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Individual and community participation has the potential to improve the U.S. society.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.7.12- Recognize opportunities for participation in community and civic action.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 12
United States Government
1 ) Explain historical and philosophical origins that shaped the government of the United States, including the Magna Carta, the Petition of Rights, the English Bill of Rights, the Mayflower Compact, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and the influence of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean-Jaques Rousseau, and the Great Awakening.

•  Comparing characteristics of limited and unlimited governments throughout the world, including constitutional, authoritarian, and totalitarian governments
Examples: constitutional—United States

authoritarian—Iran

totalitarian—North Korea

Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Government
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify key philosophers, including Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean Jaques Rousseau, connecting them to their contribution to shaping constitutional democracy.
  • Identify key documents, including Magna Carta, Petition of Rights, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, and the Virginia Declaration of Rights, connecting them to their contribution to shaping constitutional democracy.
  • Identify how the Great Awakening shaped thinking about constitutional democracy.
  • Differentiate between a given country's form of government to that of the United States.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • state of nature
  • social contract theory
  • constitutional
  • authoritarian
  • totalitarian
  • compact
  • government
  • democracy
  • right
  • Enlightenment
  • rule of law
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Key political philosophers and events that influenced the creation of the American government.
  • Key political documents that influenced the creation of the American government.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Interpret primary documents distinguishing the impact of the document's central idea on formation of American government.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Significant key philosophers, events, and documents shaped the concepts of American government and how these concepts differ from other forms of government.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.USG.AAS.12.1- Define government; contrast limited government and unlimited government; recognize documents and individuals who helped shape the government of the United States.
SS.USG.AAS.12.1a- Identify key philosophers, including Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean Jacques Rousseau.
SS.USG.AAS.12.1b - Identify key documents, including Magna Carta, Petition of Rights, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, and the Virginia Declaration of Rights.
SS.USG.AAS.12.1c -


Tags: comparing government systems, limited and unlimited governments, political process, rule of law
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Author: Ginger Boyd