ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Audio Engineer | Kids Work!

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Audio Engineer | Kids Work!

URL:

https://www.knowitall.org/interactive/audio-engineer-kids-work

Content Source:

Other
KnowItAll.org
Type: Interactive/Game

Overview:

Students will play the role of the audio engineer who monitors and adjusts the audio levels for a production. This animated interactive job exploration experience connects schoolwork with real work and familiarizes students with some of the skills involved in audio engineering. They will also understand the parts of waves and that the intensity (loudness or softness) of sound is determined by the amplitude of the sound wave. 

Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
6 ) Develop a model of waves to describe patterns in terms of amplitude and wavelength, and including that waves can cause objects to move.

Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Developing and Using Models
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Develop a model of waves to describe patterns of amplitude.
  • Develop a model of waves to describe patterns of wavelength.
  • Develop a model of waves that describes patterns that cause objects to move.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Patterns
  • Propagated
  • Waves
  • Wave amplitude
  • Wavelength
  • Net motion
  • Model
  • Relevant components
  • Peaks
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Waves can be described in terms of patterns of repeating amplitude and wavelength (e.g., in a water wave there is a repeating pattern of water being higher and then lower than the baseline level of the water).
  • Waves can cause an object to move.
  • The motion of objects varies with the amplitude and wavelength of the wave carrying it.
  • The patterns in the relationships between a wave passing, the net motion of the wave, and the motion of an object caused by the wave as it passes.
  • How waves may be initiated (e.g., by disturbing surface water or shaking a rope or spring).
  • The repeating pattern produced as a wave is propagated.
  • Waves, which are the regular patterns of motion, can be made in water by disturbing the surface. When waves move across the surface of deep water, the water goes up and down in place; there is no net motion in the direction of the wave except when the water meets a beach.
  • Waves of the same type can differ in amplitude (height of the wave) and wavelength (spacing between wave peaks).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Develop a model to make sense of wave patterns that includes relevant components (i.e., waves, wave amplitude, wavelength, and motion of objects).
  • Describe patterns of wavelengths and amplitudes.
  • Describe how waves can cause objects to move.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are similarities and differences in patterns underlying waves and use these patterns to describe simple relationships involving wave amplitude, wavelength, and the motion of an object.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.4.6- Using given models, identify patterns found in waves.


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 8
Physical Science
17 ) Create and manipulate a model of a simple wave to predict and describe the relationships between wave properties (e.g., frequency, amplitude, wavelength) and energy.

a. Analyze and interpret data to illustrate an electromagnetic spectrum.


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P8.10a: Energy is transferred from place to place.

NAEP Statement::
P8.10b: Light energy from the Sun travels through space to Earth (radiation).

NAEP Statement::
P8.10c: Thermal energy travels from a flame through the metal of a cooking pan to the water in the pan (conduction).

NAEP Statement::
P8.10d: Air warmed by a fireplace moves around a room (convection).

NAEP Statement::
P8.10e: Waves (including sound and seismic waves, waves on water, and light waves) have energy and transfer energy when they interact with matter.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Developing and Using Models; Analyzing and Interpreting Data
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns; Systems and System Models
Disciplinary Core Idea: Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Create a model of a simple wave to predict and describe the relationships between wave properties and energy.
  • Manipulate a model of a simple wave to predict and describe the relationships between wave properties and energy.
  • Analyze data to illustrate an electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Interpret data to illustrate an electromagnetic spectrum.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Manipulate
  • Model
  • Wave
  • Simple wave
  • Predict
  • Wave properties (e.g., frequency, amplitude, wavelength)
  • Energy
  • Analyze
  • Interpret
  • Illustrate
  • Electromagnetic spectrum (radio waves, visible light, microwaves, infrared light, ultraviolet light, X-rays and gamma-rays.
  • Electromagnetic radiation
  • Photons
  • Hertz
  • Volts
  • Joules
  • Displacement
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Waves represent repeating quantities.
  • A simple wave has a repeating pattern with a specific wavelength, frequency, and amplitude.
  • The frequency of a wave is the number of waves passing a point in a certain time. The unit of frequency is the hertz (Hz) and one hertz is equal to one wave per second.
  • Amplitude is the maximum displacement of the wave pattern from equilibrium.
  • Wavelength is the distance between consecutive wave crests or troughs.
  • The electromagnetic spectrum is the range of all types of electromagnetic radiation. Radiation is energy that travels and spreads out as it travels.
  • The types of electromagnetic radiation that make up the electromagnetic spectrum are radio waves, visible light, microwaves, infrared light, ultraviolet light, X-rays and gamma-rays.
  • Electromagnetic radiation can be described in terms of a stream of mass-less particles, called photons, each traveling in a wave-like pattern at the speed of light. Each photon contains a certain amount of energy. The different types of radiation are defined by the amount of energy found in the photons. Radio waves have photons with low energies, microwave photons have a little more energy than radio waves, infrared photons have still more, then visible, ultraviolet, X-rays, and, the most energetic of all, gamma-rays.
  • Electromagnetic radiation can be expressed in terms of energy, wavelength, or frequency. Frequency is measured in cycles per second, or Hertz. Wavelength is measured in meters. Energy is measured in electron volts or Joules.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Develop a model of a simple wave and identify the relevant components.
  • Describe the relationships between components of the model.
  • Use patterns observed from their model to provide causal accounts for events and make predictions for events by constructing explanations.
  • Organize given data to allow for analysis and interpretation of the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Analyze the data to identify possible causal relationships between waves and their positions in the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Interpret patterns observed from the data to provide causal accounts for events and make predictions for events by constructing explanations.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Relationships exist between wave properties (e.g., frequency, amplitude, wavelength) and energy.
  • These relationships can be predicted and described with models of simple waves.*The electromagnetic spectrum is the range of all types of electromagnetic radiation.
  • Electromagnetic radiation can be expressed in terms of energy, wavelength, or frequency and the types of radiation are arranged in the spectrum based on the measure of their energy, wavelength, and/or frequency.
  • The types of electromagnetic radiation that make up the electromagnetic spectrum are radio waves, visible light, microwaves, infrared light, ultraviolet light, X-rays and gamma-rays.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Electricity, Waves, and Information Transfer

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.8.17- Use a model to investigate ways to change the properties of a simple wave (frequency, amplitude, wavelength).


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 8
Physical Science
18 ) Use models to demonstrate how light and sound waves differ in how they are absorbed, reflected, and transmitted through different types of media.

Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Developing and Using Models
Crosscutting Concepts: Structure and Function
Disciplinary Core Idea: Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use models to demonstrate how light waves differ in how they are absorbed, reflected, and transmitted through different types of media.
  • Use models to demonstrate how sound waves differ in how they are absorbed, reflected, and transmitted through different types of media.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Light
  • Sound
  • Absorption
  • Reflection
  • Transmission
  • Media
  • Transparent
  • Translucent
  • Opaque
  • Frequency
  • Amplitude
  • Wavelength
  • Electromagnetic waves
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • A medium is not required to transmit electromagnetic waves.
  • A sound wave, a type of mechanical wave, needs a medium through which it is transmitted.
  • When a sound wave strikes an object, it is absorbed, reflected, or transmitted depending on the object's material.
  • When a light wave shines on an object, it is absorbed, reflected, or transmitted depending on the object's material and the frequency of the light.
  • The path that light travels can be traced as straight lines, except at surfaces between different transparent materials (e.g., air and water, air and glass) where the path of light bends.
  • The absorption, reflection, and transmission of light and sound waves can be identified by observing relevant characteristics of the wave, such as frequency, amplitude, and wavelength.
  • Materials with certain properties are well-suited for particular functions (e.g., lenses and mirrors, sound absorbers in concert halls, colored light filters, sound barriers next to highways).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Develop models of light and sound waves and identify the relevant components.
  • Describe the relationships between components of the model.
  • Use observations from the model to provide causal accounts for events and make predictions for events by constructing explanations.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Light and sound waves differ in how they interact with different types of media.
  • The absorption, reflection, and transmission of light and sound waves depends on the type of media through which they are transmitted.
  • Materials with certain properties are well-suited for particular functions (e.g., lenses and mirrors, sound absorbers in concert halls, colored light filters, sound barriers next to highways).
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Electricity, Waves, and Information Transfer

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.8.18- Investigate and describe how light and sound waves travel through a variety of media.


Tags: amplitude, audio engineer, sound, wave, wave length
License Type: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
Accessibility
Comments

KnowItAll.org is free for teachers. Teachers need to create a free account to access all available resources. 

  This resource provided by:  
Author: Stephanie Carver