ALEX Classroom Resource

  

The Senses: Hearing StudyJam

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

The Senses: Hearing StudyJam

URL:

https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/human-body/hearing.htm

Content Source:

Other
http://studyjams.scholastic.com/
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

The ear is specially designed to change sound waves into signals the brain can understand, allowing you to hear. That is not all they do, though. Your ears also help you balance!

This classroom resource provides a video that will describe the structures of the ear and how they work together to allow us to hear. After utilizing this resource, the students can complete the short test to assess their understanding. 

Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
9 ) Examine evidence to support an argument that the internal and external structures of plants (e.g., thorns, leaves, stems, roots, colored petals, xylem, phloem) and animals (e.g., heart, stomach, lung, brain, skin) function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
L4.4: When the environment changes, some plants and animals survive and reproduce; others die or move to new locations.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Engage in Argument from Evidence
Crosscutting Concepts: Systems and System Models; Structure and Function
Disciplinary Core Idea: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Argue from evidence to support that the internal and external structures of plants function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
  • Argue from evidence to support that the internal and external structures of animals function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • argue
  • articulate
  • evidence
  • internal
  • external
  • structure
  • survival
  • function
  • behavior
  • reproduction
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Internal and External structures serve specific functions within plants and animals.
  • The functions of internal and external structures can support survival, growth, behavior and/or reproduction in plants and animals.
  • Different structures work together as part of a system to support survival, growth, behavior, and/or reproduction.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Articulate an explanation from evidence explaining how the internal and external structures of plants and animals function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
  • Determine the strengths and weaknesses of the evidence collected, including whether or not it supports a claim about the role of internal and external structures of plants and animals in supporting survival, growth, behavior, and/or reproduction.
  • Use reasoning to connect the relevant and appropriate evidence to support an argument about the function of the internal and external structures of plants and animals.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Plants and animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Animal Studies

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.4.9- Identify basic parts of plants and animals.


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
10 ) Obtain and communicate information explaining that humans have systems that interact with one another for digestion, respiration, circulation, excretion, movement, control, coordination, and protection from disease.

Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
Crosscutting Concepts: Systems and System Models
Disciplinary Core Idea: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Obtain information explaining that humans have systems that interact with one another for digestion, respiration, circulation, excretion, movement, control, coordination, and protection from disease.
  • Communicate information explaining that humans have systems that interact with one another for digestion, respiration, circulation, excretion, movement, control, coordination, and protection from disease.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • communicate
  • articulate
  • obtain
  • structure
  • function
  • interactions
  • digestion
  • respiration
  • circulation
  • excretion
  • movement
  • control
  • coordination
  • protection
  • disease
  • body systems
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Humans have systems that interact with one another.
  • The purpose, functions, and interactions of the digestive system.
  • The purpose, functions, and interactions of the respiratory system.
  • The purpose, functions, and interactions of the circulatory system.
  • The purpose, functions, and interactions of the excretory system.
  • The purpose, functions, and interactions of the systems that contribute to movement, control, and coordination.
  • The purpose, functions, and interactions of the systems that protect the body from disease.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Obtain information by reading and comprehending grade-appropriate complex texts about the interacting systems in the human body.
  • Evaluate information about interactions and functions of human body systems by comparing and/or combining across complex texts and/or other reliable media.
  • Communicate information orally and/or in written formats about interactions and functions of human body systems.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The body is a system of interacting parts that makes up a whole and carries out functions its individual parts can not.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Animal Studies

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.4.10- Identify human systems (i.e. digestive, circulatory, and respiratory).


Tags: ear, eardrum, hearing, human body, senses, structures, systems
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: http://www.scholastic.com/terms.htm
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
Accessibility
Comments

The test may be completed as a whole group or independently on student devices.

  This resource provided by:  
Author: Hannah Bradley