ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Symbiosis StudyJam

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Symbiosis StudyJam

URL:

https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/ecosystems/symbiosis.htm

Content Source:

Other
http://studyjams.scholastic.com/
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

Sometimes you just need a little help from a friend. That is what symbiosis is all about. Even plants and animals depend on each other from time to time.

Symbiosis describes a relationship between two organisms in an environment. There are three main types of relationships: mutualism, parasitism, and commensalism.

The classroom resource provides a video that will describe the different ways organisms can interact within an ecosystem. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding.

Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 7
Life Science
8 ) Construct an explanation to predict patterns of interactions in different ecosystems in terms of the relationships between and among organisms (e.g., competition, predation, mutualism, commensalism, parasitism).


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
L8.6a: Two types of organisms may interact with one another in several ways: They may be in a producer/ consumer, predator/prey, or parasite/ host relationship.

NAEP Statement::
L8.6b: Or, one organism may scavenge or decompose another.

NAEP Statement::
L8.6c: Relationships may be competitive or mutually beneficial. Some species have become so adapted to each other that neither could survive without the other.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Articulate a statement that similar patterns of interactions occur between organisms and their environment, regardless of the ecosystem or the species involved.
  • Use evidence and reasoning to construct an explanation concerning relationships between and among organisms within ecosystems.
  • Use multiple valid and reliable sources for the evidence to identify and describe quantitative or qualitative patterns of interactions among organisms that can be used to identify causal relationships within ecosystems.
  • Use reasoning to predict patterns in the evidence.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Interactions
  • Evidence
  • Reasoning
  • Quantitative
  • Qualitative
  • Patterns
  • Ecosystems
  • Relationships
  • Competition
  • Predation
  • Mutualism
  • Commensalism
  • Parasitism
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Competitive relationships occur when organisms within an ecosystem compete for shared resources.
  • Predatory interactions occur between organisms within an ecosystem.
  • Mutually beneficial interactions occur between organisms within an ecosystem; some organisms are so dependent upon one another that they can not survive alone.
  • Resource availability affects interactions between organisms (e.g., limited resources may cause competitive relationships among organisms; those same organisms may not be in competition where resources are in abundance).
  • Competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions occur across multiple, different ecosystems.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Articulate a statement that relates a given phenomenon to a scientific idea, including that similar patterns of interactions occur between organisms and their environment, regardless of the ecosystem or the species involved.
  • Use multiple valid and reliable sources of evidence to construct an explanation for the given phenomenon.
  • Identify and describe quantitative or qualitative patterns of interactions among organisms that can be used to identify causal relationships within ecosystems, related to the given phenomenon.
  • Describe that regardless of the ecosystem or species involved, the patterns of interactions are similar.
  • Use reasoning to connect the evidence and support an explanation using patterns in the evidence to predict common interactions among organisms in ecosystems as they relate to the phenomenon.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Although the species involved in relationships (e.g., competition, predation, mutualism, commensalism, parasitism) vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments, both living and nonliving, are shared.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Investigating Biodiversity and Interdependence

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.7.8- Identify relationships among organisms as competitive, mutually beneficial, parasitic, or neutral.


Tags: commensalism, ecosystem, host, mutualism, organism, parasite, parasitism, symbiosis
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: http://www.scholastic.com/terms.htm
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
Accessibility
Comments

The test may be completed as a whole group or independently on student devices. 

  This resource provided by:  
Author: Hannah Bradley