ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Tiktaalik: A Fish Out of Water

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Tiktaalik: A Fish Out of Water

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/midlit10.sci.spltransition/tiktaalik-a-fish-out-of-water/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Interactive/Game

Overview:

In this blended lesson supporting literacy skills, students learn that transitional fossils provide scientists with evidence to establish how major animal groups are related to one another in evolutionary terms. Students develop their literacy skills as they explore a science focus on a recently discovered fossil named Tiktaalik. During this process, they read informational text, learn and practice vocabulary words, and explore content through video and interactive activities. This resource is part of the Inspiring Middle School Literacy Collection.

Students need to be signed in to complete this lesson. Go to "About This Activity" in "Support Materials" or click here.

Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 7
Life Science
15 ) Analyze and interpret data for patterns of change in anatomical structures of organisms using the fossil record and the chronological order of fossil appearance in rock layers.


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
L8.11d: Fossils indicate that many organisms that lived long ago are extinct.

NAEP Statement::
L8.11e: Extinction of a species is common; most of the species that have lived on the Earth no longer exist.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Analyzing and Interpreting Data
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: Unity and Diversity
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze and interpret data, focusing on patterns, to describe the evolution of organisms.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Relative dating
  • Fossil
  • Evolve
  • Extinct
  • Mass extinction
  • Analogous structures
  • Homologous structures
  • Diversity
  • Vestigial structures
  • Species
  • Speciation
  • Anatomical structures
  • Chronological
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Oldest fossils are found deeper in the earth, younger fossils are found closer to the surface.
  • Life evolved from simple to more complex forms of life.
  • Periodic extinctions occurred throughout the history of earth.
  • Fossils found closer to the surface more resemble modern species.
  • Bacteria today closely resemble earliest fossils.
  • Fossils of transitional species exist, and suggest evolution from one species to another (e.g., whale hind leg bones).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Organize the given data, including the appearance of specific types of fossilized organisms in the fossil record as a function of time, as determined by their locations in the sedimentary layers or the ages of rocks.
  • Organize the data in a way that allows for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of similarities and differences in the data.
  • Analyze and interpret the data to determine evidence for patterns of change in anatomical structures of organisms using the fossil record and the chronological order of fossil appearance in rock layers.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The collection of fossils and their placement in chronological order is known as the fossil record. It records the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of many life forms throughout the history of life on earth.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Studying the Development and Reproduction of Organisms

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.7.15- Identify patterns that indicate a change in a species over time.


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 7
Life Science
16 ) Construct an explanation based on evidence (e.g., cladogram, phylogenetic tree) for the anatomical similarities and differences among modern organisms and between modern and fossil organisms, including living fossils (e.g., alligator, horseshoe crab, nautilus, coelacanth).


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
L8.12a: Similarities among organisms are found in anatomical features, which can be used to infer the degree of relatedness among organisms.

NAEP Statement::
L8.12b: In classifying organisms, biologists consider details of internal and external structures to be more important than behavior or general appearance.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: Unity and Diversity
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use evidence to explain anatomical similarities and differences among modern organisms.
  • Use evidence to explain anatomical similarities and differences among modern organisms and fossilized organisms, including living fossils.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Explanation
  • Evidence
  • Cladogram
  • Phylogenetic tree
  • Anatomical similarities
  • Anatomical differences
  • Organism
  • Fossil
  • Living fossil
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Anatomical similarities and differences among organisms can be used to infer evolutionary relationships among modern organisms and fossil organisms.
  • Anatomical similarities and differences between modern organisms (e.g., skulls of modern crocodiles, skeletons of birds; features of modern whales and elephants).
  • Organisms that share a pattern of anatomical features are likely to be more closely related than are organisms that do not share a pattern of anatomical features, due to the cause-and-effect relationship between genetic makeup and anatomy (e.g., although birds and insects both have wings, the organisms are structurally very different and not very closely related; the wings of birds and bats are structurally similar, and the organisms are more closely related; the limbs of horses and zebras are structurally very similar, and they are more closely related than are birds and bats or birds and insects).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Articulate a statement that relates a given phenomenon to a scientific idea, including anatomical similarities and differences among organisms.
  • Identify and use multiple valid and reliable sources of evidence to construct an explanation for anatomical similarities and differences among organisms.
  • Use reasoning to connect the evidence and support an explanation for anatomical similarities and differences among organisms.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Organisms that share a pattern of anatomical features are likely to be more closely related than organisms that do not share a pattern of anatomical features.
  • Changes over time in the anatomical features observable in the fossil record can be used to infer lines of evolutionary descent by linking extinct organisms to living organisms through a series of fossilized organisms that share a basic set of anatomical features.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Studying the Development and Reproduction of Organisms
Tags: evolution, fossil, organisms, Tiktaalik
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Stephanie Carver