ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Scientific Methods StudyJam

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Scientific Methods StudyJam

URL:

https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/scientific-inquiry/scientific-methods.htm

Content Source:

Other
http://studyjams.scholastic.com/
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

Scientists are always working to better understand the world. They use the scientific method to help them. The scientific method includes making observations, developing hypotheses, designing experiments, collecting data, and then drawing conclusions.

The classroom resource provides a video that will introduce students to the scientific method and experimentation. There is a karaoke song that students can learn to help them remember the steps in the scientific method. Students can use the information presented in this video to follow the scientific method as they plan their own investigations. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding.

Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: K
1 ) Investigate the resulting motion of objects when forces of different strengths and directions act upon them (e.g., object being pushed, object being pulled, two objects colliding).


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.13: An object is in motion when its position is changing. The speed of an object is defined by how far it travels divided by the amount of time it took to travel that far.

NAEP Statement::
P4.14: The motion of objects can be changed by pushing or pulling. The size of the change is related to the size of the force (push or pull) and the weight (mass) of the object on which the force is exerted. When an object does not move in response to a push or a pull, it is because another push or pull (friction) is being applied by the environment.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and Effect
Disciplinary Core Idea: Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Investigate the resulting motion of objects when forces of different strengths act upon them.
  • Investigate the resulting motion of objects when forces of different directions act upon them.
  • Predict the effect of the push or pull on the motion of an object, based on prior experiences.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Push
  • Pull
  • Collide
  • Investigate
  • Result
  • Motion
  • Objects
  • Forces
  • Strengths
  • Directions
  • Refute
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Pushes and pulls can have different strengths and directions.
  • Pushing or pulling on an object can change the speed or direction of its motion and can start or stop it.
  • When objects touch or collide, they push on one another and can change motion.
  • A bigger push or pull makes things speed up or slow down more quickly.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Investigate forces and interactions.
  • Describe objects and their motions.
  • Describe relative strengths and directions of the push or pull applied to an object.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Simple tests can be designed to gather evidence to support or refute ideas about effects on the motion of the object caused by changes in the strength or direction of the pushes and pulls.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
*Push and Pull
*Balls and Ramps, Insights
*Sidewalk Safety, ETA/hand2mind

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.K.1- Investigate ways to move different objects to include pushing, pulling, and colliding objects.


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.2: Objects vary in the extent to which they absorb and reflect light and conduct heat (thermal energy) and electricity.

NAEP Statement::
P4.9: Light travels in straight lines. When light strikes substances and objects through which it cannot pass, shadows result. When light travels obliquely from one substance to another (air and water), it changes direction.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and Effect
Disciplinary Core Idea: Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Given materials, determine if light passes through, partially passes through, is blocked or is reflected.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • transparent
  • translucent
  • opaque
  • reflect
  • investigate
  • observe
  • light
  • partial
  • block
  • material
  • record
  • data
  • shiny
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Some materials allow all light to pass through.
  • Some materials allow partial light to pass through.
  • Some materials block all the light from passing through.
  • Some materials reflect light, which changes its direction.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Investigate to determine the effect of placing objects made of different materials in a beam of light.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Simple tests can gather evidence to determine that placing different materials in a beam of light will cause light to either: pass through, partially pass through, block, or reflect.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Sound and Light, Foss
Sky, Delta

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.1.3- Identify objects that are see through (transparent) and objects that are not see through (opaque).


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
2 ) Investigate, measure, and communicate in a graphical format how an observed pattern of motion (e.g., a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, two children teetering on a see-saw, a model vehicle rolling down a ramp of varying heights, a pendulum swinging) can be used to predict the future motion of an object.


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.13: An object is in motion when its position is changing. The speed of an object is defined by how far it travels divided by the amount of time it took to travel that far.

NAEP Statement::
P4.14: The motion of objects can be changed by pushing or pulling. The size of the change is related to the size of the force (push or pull) and the weight (mass) of the object on which the force is exerted. When an object does not move in response to a push or a pull, it is because another push or pull (friction) is being applied by the environment.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify the phenomenon under investigation.
  • Identify the evidence to address the purpose of the investigation.
  • Plan the investigation.
  • Collect data.
  • Investigate the phenomenon, which includes observable patterns in the motion of an object.
  • Measure how an observed pattern of motion can be used to predict the future motion of an object.
  • Communicate in graphical form how an observed pattern of motion can be used to predict the future motion of an object.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Investigate
  • Measure
  • Communicate
  • Graphical format
  • Motion
  • Pattern
  • Predict
  • Phenomenon
  • Data
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The patterns of an object's motion in various situations can be observed and measured.
  • When past motion exhibits a regular pattern, future motion can be predicted from it.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Investigate the motion of an object.
  • Identify patterns in the motion of an object.
  • Measure the motion of an object.
  • Communicate graphically the pattern of motion of an object.
  • Use patterns of motion of an object to predict future motion of that object.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The pattern in the motion of the object can be used to predict future motion.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Forces and Investigations

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.3.2- Recognize patterns of motion (e.g., straight, back and forth, zigzag, fast, slow, falling, rolling); predict the motion of a common object when a force (push, pull, gravity) is applied.


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
2 ) Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

a. Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways (e.g., rubbing hands together, burning leaves) and can move from one object to another by conduction.

b. Demonstrate that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.

c. Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop through which an electric current can pass.


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.11: Electricity flowing through an electrical circuit produces magnetic effects in the wires. In an electrical circuit containing a battery, a bulb, and a bell, energy from the battery is transferred to the bulb and the bell, which in turn transfer the energy to their surroundings as light, sound, and heat (thermal energy).

NAEP Statement::
P4.2: Objects vary in the extent to which they absorb and reflect light and conduct heat (thermal energy) and electricity.

NAEP Statement::
P4.7: Heat (thermal energy), electricity, light, and sound are forms of energy.§

NAEP Statement::
P4.8: Heat (thermal energy) results when substances burn, when certain kinds of materials rub against each other, and when electricity flows though wires. Metals are good conductors of heat (thermal energy) and electricity. Increasing the temperature of any substance requires the addition of energy.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations; Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions; Developing and Using Models
Crosscutting Concepts: Energy and Matter
Disciplinary Core Idea: Energy
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound.
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by light.
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by heat.
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by electric currents.
  • Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways.
  • Provide evidence that heat can move from one object to another by conduction.
  • Demonstrate that different objects can absorb energy.
  • Demonstrate that different objects can reflect energy.
  • Demonstrate that different objects can conduct energy.
  • Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop for the electric current to pass through.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Construct
  • Transfer
  • Energy
  • Potential energy
  • Kinetic energy
  • Friction
  • Conduction
  • Absorb
  • Reflect
  • Circuit
  • Open circuit
  • Close circuit
  • Heat
  • Radiation
  • Convection
  • Collision
  • Motion
  • Electrical energy
  • Stored energy
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Energy is present whenever there are moving objects, sound, light, or heat.
  • The transfer of energy, including the following:
    • Collisions between objects.
    • Light traveling from one place to another.
    • Electric currents producing motion, sound, heat, or light.
    • Sound traveling from one place to another.
    • Heat passing from one object to another.
    • Motion, sound, heat, and light causing a different type of energy to be observed after an interaction.
  • Heat is produced in many ways.
  • Heat can move via conduction.
  • The properties of different objects cause them to be able to absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.
  • Electric currents pass through a circuit.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Collaboratively plan and carry out an investigation that converts energy one form to another.
    • Identify the phenomenon.
    • Identify the evidence to address the purpose of the investigation.
    • Collect the data.
  • Construct an explanation using evidence about heat production.
  • Develop a model demonstrating that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.
  • Develop a model demonstrating electric circuits.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Energy can be transferred in various ways and between objects.
  • Heat energy can be produced in many ways.
  • The properties of objects, e.g. ability to absorb, reflect, or conduct energy, relate to their function.
  • Electric energy can be transferred through circuits.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Energy and Waves

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.4.2- Recognize different sources of heat; Identify materials that are conductors of heat, such as metals.


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 5
2 ) Investigate matter to provide mathematical evidence, including graphs, to show that regardless of the type of reaction (e.g., new substance forming due to dissolving or mixing) or change (e.g., phase change) that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of the matter is conserved.


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.1: Objects and substances have properties. Weight (mass) and volume are properties that can be measured using appropriate tools.*

NAEP Statement::
P4.3: Matter exists in several different states; the most common states are solid, liquid, and gas. Each state of matter has unique properties. For instance, gases are easily compressed while solids and liquids are not. The shape of a solid is independent of its container; liquids and gases take the shape of their containers.

NAEP Statement::
P4.6: One way to change matter from one state to another and back again is by heating and cooling.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking
Crosscutting Concepts: Scale, Proportion, and Quantity
Disciplinary Core Idea: Matter and Its Interactions
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Measure and graph quantities to provide evidence that regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of matter is conserved.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Quantitative measurements (mass, weight, standard unit)
  • Physical quantities (weight, time, temperature, volume)
  • Property changes
  • Matter
  • Reaction
  • Heating
  • Cooling
  • Mixing
  • Physical properties
  • Conservation of matter
  • Graphing
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The amount (weight) of matter is conserved when it changes form, even in transitions in which it seems to vanish.
  • No matter what reaction or change in properties occurs, the total weight of the substances does not change. (Boundary: Mass and weight are not distinguished at this grade level.)
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Measure and graph the given quantities using standard units, including: the weight of substances before they are heated, cooled, or mixed and the weight of substances, including any new substances produced by a reaction, after they are heated, cooled, or mixed.
  • Measure and/or calculate the difference between the total weight of the substances (using standard units) before and after they are heated, cooled, and/or mixed.
  • Describe the changes in properties they observe during and/or after heating, cooling, or mixing substances.
  • Use their measurements and calculations to describe that the total weights of the substances did not change, regardless of the reaction or changes in properties that were observed.
  • Use measurements and descriptions of weight, as well as the assumption of consistent patterns in natural systems, to describe evidence to address scientific questions about the conservation of the amount of matter, including the idea that the total weight of matter is conserved after heating, cooling, or mixing substances.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Standard units are used to measure and describe physical quantities such as weight and can be used to demonstrate the conservation of the total weight of matter.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Matter and Interactions

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.5.2- Recognize that regardless of the type of reaction (e.g., new substance forming due to dissolving or mixing) or change (e.g., phase change) that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of the matter is conserved.


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 6
Earth and Space Science
8 ) Plan and carry out investigations that demonstrate the chemical and physical processes that form rocks and cycle Earth's materials (e.g., processes of crystallization, heating and cooling, weathering, deformation, and sedimentation).


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
E8.5a: Rocks and rock formations bear evidence of the minerals, materials, temperature/pressure conditions, and forces that created them.

NAEP Statement::
E8.5b: Some formations show evidence that they were deposited by volcanic eruptions.

NAEP Statement::
E8.5c: Others are composed of sand and smaller particles that are buried and cemented by dissolved minerals to form solid rock again.

NAEP Statement::
E8.5d: Still others show evidence that they were once earlier rock types that were exposed to heat and pressure until they changed shape and, in some cases, melted and recrystallized.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations
Crosscutting Concepts: Energy and Matter
Disciplinary Core Idea: Earth's Systems
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Plan an investigation that demonstrates the chemical processes that form rocks and cycle Earth material.
  • Plan an investigation that demonstrates the physical processes that form rocks and cycle Earth material.
  • Carry out an investigation that demonstrates the chemical processes that form rocks and cycle Earth material.
  • Carry out an investigation that demonstrates the physical processes that form rocks and cycle Earth material.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Rock
  • Melting
  • Sedimentation
  • Crystallization
  • Chemical change
  • Physical change
  • Deformation
  • Interior energy
  • Cycling
  • Weathering
  • Erosion
  • Solar energy
  • Sedimentary rock
  • Igneous rock
  • Metamorphic rock
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Rocks are the solid mineral materials forming part of the surface of the Earth and other similar planets.
  • Different Earth processes (melting, sedimentation, crystallization) drive matter cycling (from one type of Earth material to another) through observable chemical and physical changes.
  • Chemical changes are changes that result in the formation of new chemical substances.
  • Physical changes involve changes into new forms or shapes in which the chemical identity of the substance is not changed.
  • Melting is a physical change in which a solid changes to a liquid as a result of exposure to heat.
  • Sedimentation is a process in which material (like rock or sand) is carried to the bottom of a body of water and forms a solid layer. Sedimentary rock consists of cemented sediment.
  • Crystallization is the process of the formation of crystals from a liquid. Igneous rocks are the result of crystallizing magma.
  • Deformation is a physical change in a rock's shape or size. Rocks become deformed when the Earth's crust is stretched, compressed, or heated.
  • Metamorphic rock was once one form of rock but changed to another under the influence of heat or pressure.
  • Energy from Earth's interior and the sun drive Earth processes that together cause matter cycling through different forms of Earth materials.
  • The movement of energy that originates from the Earth's hot interior causes the cycling of matter through the Earth processes of melting, crystallization, and deformation.
  • Energy from the sun causes matter to cycle via processes that produce weathering, erosion, and sedimentation (e.g., wind, rain).
  • Weathering is the chemical or physical breaking down or dissolving of rocks and minerals on Earth's surface.
  • Erosion is the act in which Earth is worn away, often by wind, water, or ice.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify the phenomena under investigation, which includes the chemical and physical processes of Earth.
  • Identify the purpose of the investigation, which includes demonstrating the chemical and physical processes that form rocks and cycle Earth materials.
  • Develop a plan for the investigation individually or collaboratively.
  • Describe factors used in the investigation including appropriate units (if necessary), independent and dependent variables, controls and number of trials for each experimental condition.
  • Perform the investigation as prescribed by the plan.
  • Use data from the investigation to provide an causal account of the relationship between chemical and physical processes and the formation of rocks and the cycling of Earth materials.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • All Earth processes are the result of energy flowing and matter cycling within and among the planet's systems. This energy is derived from the sun and Earth's hot interior. The energy that flows and matter that cycles produce chemical and physical changes in Earth's materials.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Exploring Plate Tectonics

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.6.8- Identify the physical process (sedimentation, heat and pressure, weathering, cooling) that results in the formation of rocks; use a model to demonstrate the rock cycle.


Tags: conclusion, data, experiment, hypothesis, observation, scientific method
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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AccessibilityAudio resources: includes a transcript or subtitles
Comments

The test may be completed as a whole group or independently on student devices.

There are printable lyrics available for the karaoke song.

  This resource provided by:  
Author: Hannah Bradley