ALEX Classroom Resource

  

What Is Space and How Do We Study It? Crash Course Geography # 3

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

What Is Space and How Do We Study It? Crash Course Geography # 3

URL:

https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/mtq2PG67w4E?autoplay=1&iv_load_policy=3&loop=1&modestbranding=1&playlist=mtq2PG67w4E

Content Source:

Other
YouTube
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

Today we're going to talk about space, but not like stars and satellites and stuff. Instead, we're going to talk about geographic space. In geography, we can look at the world and the places and spaces we inhabit with four distinct lenses: space as a container, topologically, socially, and how we perceive it. On this journey, we'll make stops in Antarctica, Haiti, and China as we introduce the tools you'll need from surveying and remote sensing to community-created maps to help us better understand and navigate our world.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Geography
1 ) Describe the world in spatial terms using maps and other geographic representations, tools, and technologies.

•  Explaining the use of map essentials, including type, projections, scale, legend, distance, direction, grid, and symbols
Examples: type—reference, thematic, planimetric, topographic, globe and map projections, aerial photographs, satellite images

distance—fractional, graphic, and verbal scales

direction—lines of latitude and longitude, cardinal and intermediate directions

•  Identifying geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information from a spatial perspective
Examples: Google Earth, Global Positioning System (GPS), geographic information system (GIS), satellite-remote sensing, aerial photography

•  Utilizing maps to explain relationships and environments among people and places, including trade patterns, governmental alliances, and immigration patterns
•  Applying mental maps to answer geographic questions, including how experiences and cultures influence perceptions and decisions
•  Categorizing the geographic organization of people, places, and environments using spatial models
Examples: urban land-use patterns, distribution and linkages of cities, migration patterns, population-density patterns, spread of culture traits, spread of contagious diseases through a population

Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, Civics and Government
Course Title: Geography
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Demonstrate the use of geographic representations, tools and technologies.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • spatial thinking
  • spatial relationships
  • spatial perspective
  • spatial patterns
  • spatial models
  • geospatial technologies
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Types of maps or geographic resources—reference, thematic, planimetric, topographic, globe and map projections, aerial photographs, satellite images.
  • The difference between aerial photography and satellite images and their properties for interpreting spatial patterns.
  • The uses of GIS in portraying geographic or spatial patterns and in answering geographic questions.
  • The uses of mapping technology to trace diseases through a population geographic trade patterns, governmental alliances, and immigration patterns, mental maps, cultures, urban land-use patterns, distribution and linkages of cities, migration patterns, population-density patterns, spread (diffusion) of culture traits, spread (diffusion) of contagious.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Read, analyze and interpret maps, aerial photography, satellite images, and other types of mapping technology.
  • Use mental maps.
  • Use GPS for locations.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Maps portray human and physical geographic patterns, understand the use of GPS and GIS in explaining geographic patterns, that mental maps are important in understanding cultural perceptions and the organization of cultural landscapes.
Tags: Google Earth, GPS, spatial terms
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://www.youtube.com/static?template=terms
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
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Author: Ginger Boyd