ALEX Classroom Resource

  

The Rise of the West and Historical Methodology/Crash Course World History

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

The Rise of the West and Historical Methodology/Crash Course World History

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/8fe2c7e9-8d1e-4f70-9fbd-946eb8082910/the-rise-of-the-west-and-historical-methodology-crash-course-world-history-212/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

Join host John Green to learn about the methods of writing history by looking at some of the ways that the rise of the West has been recorded. In the episode, we'll cover what the West is, the Rise of the West, and the different ways that historians and other academics have explained how the West became dominant in the world. Also discussed are explanations from Acemoglu and Robinson's Why Nations Fail, Francis Fukuyama's The Origins of Political Order, and Ian Morris's Why the West Rules, for Now.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9
World History: 1500 to the Present
5 ) Describe the rise of absolutism and constitutionalism and their impact on European nations.

•  Contrasting philosophies of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and the belief in the divine right of kings
•  Comparing absolutism as it developed in France, Russia, and Prussia, including the reigns of Louis XIV, Peter the Great, and Frederick the Great
•  Identifying major provisions of the Petition of Rights and the English Bill of Rights
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: World History: 1500 to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate the impact of the philosophies of absolutism and constitutionalism, including the impact of the Petition of Rights and the English Bill of Rights.
  • Compare and contrast the philosophies of constitutionalism and absolutism as evidenced by the ideas of social and political philosophers and philosophies of the time.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • absolutism
  • constitutionalism
  • Petition of Rights
  • English Bill of Rights
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The definitions of absolutism and constitutionalism and the impact these philosophies had on European nations.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use primary resources, evaluate influential philosophies.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The philosophies of absolutism and constitutionalism had a lasting impact on European nations.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.9.5- Define natural right; identify common characteristics of a monarchy and of a constitutional government.
SS.AAS.9.5a - Identify the Petition of Rights and the English Bill of Rights by giving examples of civil liberties and limited government.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9
World History: 1500 to the Present
14 ) Describe causes and consequences of World War II.

Examples: causes—unanswered aggression, Axis goal of world conquest

consequences—changes in political boundaries; Allied goals; lasting issues such as the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and Nuremberg Trials

•  Explaining the rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan
•  Identifying turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters
•  Depicting geographic locations of world events between 1939 and 1945
•  Identifying on a map changes in national borders as a result of World War II
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: World History: 1500 to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain the causes of World War II.
  • Relate the consequences of World War II to the resulting global changes.
  • Explain the rise of militarist and totalitarian states at the onset of WWII.
  • Judge important turning points of World War II.
  • Depict graphically the locations of world events from 1939-1945.
  • Depict on a map changes in national borders due to WWII.
  • Relate the consequences of World War II to the resulting global changes.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Axis Powers
  • Allied Powers
  • Holocaust
  • Atomic Age
  • Nuremburg Trials
  • militarist
  • totalitarian
  • European Theater
  • Pacific Theater
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How to describe the causes and consequences of WWII.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Investigate and explain causal factors for historical events, using a variety of primary resources.
  • Develop and defend a position related to a historical event, citing specific textual evidence to support the student's position.
  • Relate historical consequences to resulting social and political changes.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many causes and consequences of World War II.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.9.14- Define global conflict and describe how World War II was a global conflict; recognize social, economic, and/or political changes, key events, and people from World War II including the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and the Nuremberg Trials.
SS.AAS.9.14a- Identify turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters.
SS.AAS.9.14b- Identify the map changes in national borders as a result of World War II.
SS.AAS.9.14c- Identify the Axis and Allied Powers.
SS.AAS.9.14d- Iden


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate the events and policies leading up to World War II.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Fascism
  • Nazism
  • Communism
  • Isolationism
  • Holocaust
  • appeasement
  • invasion
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The events that lead to World War II.
  • The impact of political movements such as fascism, Nazism, and communism on conflicts in Europe.
  • The effects of isolationism, including the debate about United States isolationism and changes in attitudes after Pearl Harbor.
  • Roles of significant World War II leaders, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler.
  • The impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media.
  • Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information related to historical events.
  • Read and comprehend historical texts independently and proficiently on various topics related to events that led to WWII and the effect of those events on American foreign policy today.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many events and policies leading up to WWII.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.8- Identify events leading to the outbreak of World War II; define Fascism, Nazism, Communism, appeasement, and neutrality. Identify Axis and Allied powers during World War II. Identify militarism of the Axis Powers. Recognize U.S. attempts to remain neutral.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 12
United States Government
1 ) Explain historical and philosophical origins that shaped the government of the United States, including the Magna Carta, the Petition of Rights, the English Bill of Rights, the Mayflower Compact, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and the influence of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean-Jaques Rousseau, and the Great Awakening.

•  Comparing characteristics of limited and unlimited governments throughout the world, including constitutional, authoritarian, and totalitarian governments
Examples: constitutional—United States

authoritarian—Iran

totalitarian—North Korea

Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Government
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify key philosophers, including Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean Jaques Rousseau, connecting them to their contribution to shaping constitutional democracy.
  • Identify key documents, including Magna Carta, Petition of Rights, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, and the Virginia Declaration of Rights, connecting them to their contribution to shaping constitutional democracy.
  • Identify how the Great Awakening shaped thinking about constitutional democracy.
  • Differentiate between a given country's form of government to that of the United States.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • state of nature
  • social contract theory
  • constitutional
  • authoritarian
  • totalitarian
  • compact
  • government
  • democracy
  • right
  • Enlightenment
  • rule of law
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Key political philosophers and events that influenced the creation of the American government.
  • Key political documents that influenced the creation of the American government.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Interpret primary documents distinguishing the impact of the document's central idea on formation of American government.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Significant key philosophers, events, and documents shaped the concepts of American government and how these concepts differ from other forms of government.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.USG.AAS.12.1- Define government; contrast limited government and unlimited government; recognize documents and individuals who helped shape the government of the United States.
SS.USG.AAS.12.1a- Identify key philosophers, including Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean Jacques Rousseau.
SS.USG.AAS.12.1b - Identify key documents, including Magna Carta, Petition of Rights, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, and the Virginia Declaration of Rights.
SS.USG.AAS.12.1c -


Tags: absolutism, communism, constitutionalism, fascism, limited unlimited governments, nazism
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Author: Ginger Boyd