ALEX Classroom Resource

  

How World War I Started/Crash Course World History

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

How World War I Started/Crash Course World History

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/d8148c7c-655f-400e-b880-bd115fdecc7f/how-world-war-i-started-crash-course-world-history-209/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

Join host John Green to learn about World War I and the confusion surrounding its beginning. You'll learn about Franz Ferdinand, Gavrilo Pincep, the Black Hand, and why the Serbian nationalists wanted to kill the Archduke. While there's no good answer as to who exactly started the war, this episode of Crash Course will sort through the dates and confusion with lively discussion as always.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9
World History: 1500 to the Present
12 ) Explain causes and consequences of World War I, including imperialism, militarism, nationalism, and the alliance system.

•  Describing the rise of Communism in Russia during World War I
Examples: return of Vladimir Lenin, rise of the Bolsheviks

•  Describing military technology used during World War I
•  Identifying problems created by the Treaty of Versailles of 1919
Examples: Germany's reparations and war guilt, international controversy over the League of Nations

•  Identifying alliances during World War I and boundary changes after World War I
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: World History: 1500 to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain the causes and consequences of imperialism, militarism, nationalism, and the alliance system of WWI.
  • Describe the rise of communism in Russia during WWI.
  • Describe military technology of WWI.
  • Summarize problems created by the Treaty of Versailles of 1919.
  • Describe the alliances of WWI and boundary changes after WWI.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • imperialism
  • militarism
  • nationalism
  • alliance system
  • Bolsheviks
  • Treaty of Versailles of 1919
  • reparations
  • War Guilt Clause
  • League of Nations
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How to explain the causes and consequences of WWI.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify causes and consequences of historical events using a variety of primary and secondary historical resources.
  • Judge the importance of historical events using specific textual evidence to support the student's position.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many causes and consequences of World War I.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.9.12- Define total war; identify key events and/or people from World War I; describe military technology used during World War I.
SS.AAS.9.12a- Describe the rise of communism in Russia during WWI.
SS.AAS.9.12b- Identify problems created by the Treaty of Versailles of 1919 including Germany's reparations and the war guilt clause.
SS.AAS.9.12c- Identify alliances during World War I and boundary changes after World War I.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the causes and events of the United States' military involvement in World War I in order to determine the long-term social, political, and economic impact on the United States.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • World War I
  • Treaty of Versailles
  • mobilization
  • imperialism
  • nationalism
  • militarism
  • nativism
  • fascist
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I.
  • Social and political changes and attitudes in the United States related to involvement in World War I, including: American neutrality, mobilization, economic changes, and political changes.
  • The role of imperialism, militarism, nationalism, nativism, and the alliance system in World War I.
  • Geographical and political boundaries of Europe and the Middle East, pre- and post-World War I.
  • Controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations.
  • Short- and long-term effects of the Treaty of Versailles.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Explain the changing role of the United States during specific historical periods and in relationship to specific historical events.
  • Describe the effects of political and social movements and ideologies.
  • Analyze the social and political causes, events, and impact of specific historical events.
  • Identify geographical and political changes related to specific historical events.
  • Analyze controversies related to political policies, plans, and agreements.
  • Analyze primary and secondary sources.
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many causes and effects of the United States' military involvement in World War I and these had significant social, political, and economic impact on the United States.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.4- Define militarism, nationalism, imperialism, and alliances; understand that the United States entry into World War I had a significant impact on the outcome of the war; identify the consequences of World War I.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate the events and policies leading up to World War II.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Fascism
  • Nazism
  • Communism
  • Isolationism
  • Holocaust
  • appeasement
  • invasion
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The events that lead to World War II.
  • The impact of political movements such as fascism, Nazism, and communism on conflicts in Europe.
  • The effects of isolationism, including the debate about United States isolationism and changes in attitudes after Pearl Harbor.
  • Roles of significant World War II leaders, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler.
  • The impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media.
  • Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information related to historical events.
  • Read and comprehend historical texts independently and proficiently on various topics related to events that led to WWII and the effect of those events on American foreign policy today.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many events and policies leading up to WWII.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.8- Identify events leading to the outbreak of World War II; define Fascism, Nazism, Communism, appeasement, and neutrality. Identify Axis and Allied powers during World War II. Identify militarism of the Axis Powers. Recognize U.S. attempts to remain neutral.


Tags: Black Hand, communism, fascism, Franz Ferdinand, Gavrilo Pincep, Nazism, Serbian nationalists, Treaty of Versailles, World War I
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Author: Ginger Boyd