ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Bellamy and Evolution/Filthy Dreamers

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Bellamy and Evolution/Filthy Dreamers

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/bellamy-and-evolution-video/filthy-dreamers/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

Some professor and their lessons at Florida State College of Women were targeted as being subversive and amoral. Professor Raymond Bellamy taught a progressive curriculum in his sociology courses while rumors that he was teaching controversial and subversive topics spread among fundamentalist activists who wanted the teaching of Creationism introduced on campus.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 6
United States Studies: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
9 ) Critique major social and cultural changes in the United States since World War II.

•  Identifying key persons and events of the modern Civil Rights Movement
Examples: persons—Martin Luther King Jr.; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis (Alabama)

events—Brown versus Board of Education, Montgomery Bus Boycott, student protests, Freedom Rides, Selma-to-Montgomery Voting Rights March, political assassinations (Alabama)

•  Describing the changing role of women in United States' society and how it affected the family unit
Examples: women in the workplace, latchkey children

•  Recognizing the impact of music genres and artists on United States' culture since World War II
Examples: genres—protest songs; Motown, rock and roll, rap, folk, and country music

artists—Elvis Presley, the Beatles, Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, Hank Williams (Alabama)

•  Identifying the impact of media, including newspapers, AM and FM radio, television, twenty-four hour sports and news programming, talk radio, and Internet social networking, on United States' culture since World War II
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Studies: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain how the use of boycotts and demonstrations led by various ethnic groups has resulted in social change in the United States.
  • Describe the changing role of women in the workplace and the impact on the family unit.
  • Describe the cultural effect of music genres, artists and media on influencing social practices and policies following World War II.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Brown vs. Board of Education
  • Montgomery Bus Boycott
  • Freedom Rides
  • Selma-to-Montgomery Voting Rights March
  • Motown
  • AM/FM radio
  • protest songs
  • demonstrations
  • genre
  • political assassinations
  • latchkey children
  • Civil Rights Movement
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The key figures involved in the Civil Rights Movement.
  • The major social and cultural changes that occurred in the United States post WWII.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Critique multiple points of view to explain the ideas and actions of individuals and ethnic groups to gain equality.
  • Cite evidence to support changes in social and cultural traditions using primary and secondary sources.
  • Evaluate the contribution of technology and mass methods of communication to influence people, places, ideas, and events.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were important the social and cultural changes that occurred in the U.S. after WWII.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.6.9- Define civil rights movement; identify key figures and events of the Civil Rights movement, including Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing; identify culturally influential music from the post-World War II world including, Elvis Presley, the Beatles, Bob Dylan, and Jimi Hendrix.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
2 ) Evaluate social and political origins, accomplishments, and limitations of Progressivism. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Explaining the impact of the Populist Movement on the role of the federal government in American society
•  Assessing the impact of muckrakers on public opinion during the Progressive movement, including Upton Sinclair, Jacob A. Riis, and Ida M. Tarbell
Examples: women's suffrage, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, temperance movement

•  Explaining national legislation affecting the Progressive movement, including the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act
•  Determining the influence of the Niagara Movement, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Carter G. Woodson on the Progressive Era
•  Assessing the significance of the public education movement initiated by Horace Mann
•  Comparing the presidential leadership of Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson in obtaining passage of measures regarding trust-busting, the Hepburn Act, the Pure Food and Drug Act, the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Reserve Act, and conservation
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate the political, economic, and social origins, accomplishments, and limitations of the Progressive Era and determine the influence it has had on American society through the present.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • textual evidence
  • evaluate
  • cite
  • Progressivism
  • muckraker
  • trust
  • antitrust
  • suffrage
  • temperance movement
  • civil rights
  • trust-busting
  • conservation
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The social, economic, and political origins, accomplishments, and limitations of the Progressive.
  • The impact of the Populist Movement on the role of the federal government in American society.
  • The impact of muckrakers on public opinion during the Progressive movement, including Upton Sinclair, Jacob A. Riis, and Ida M. Tarbell.
  • The influence and impact of social movements, including: women's suffrage, temperance movement, and civil rights for African-Americans.
  • The influence of specific social groups and influential individuals on the Progressive Era, including: Ida B. Wells-Barnett, the Niagara Movement, the National *Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Carter G. Woodson.
  • National legislation affecting the Progressive movement, including the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act.
  • The significance of the public education movement initiated by Horace Mann.
  • The impact of the presidential leadership of Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson in obtaining passage of measures regarding trust-busting, the Hepburn Act, the Pure Food and Drug Act, the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Reserve Act, and conservation.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Effectively evaluate the complexities, origins, limitations, accomplishments and affects of social and political movements such as the Progressive and Populist Movements.
  • Evaluate the influence of prominent individuals and groups from specific historical time periods on public opinion, social and political movements, and national legislation.
  • Explain national legislation that was influence by and that affected social and political movements.
  • Assess the significance of the public education movement initiated by Horace Mann.
  • Compare the presidential leadership during specific historical periods.
  • Analyze primary and secondary historical sources.
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were political, economic, and social origins, accomplishments, and limitations of the Progressive Era and these have impacted American society through the present.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.2- Identify the goals of the Progressive movement; identify people and/or describe major events and developments in the United States during the Progressive movement.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9-12
Psychology
18 ) Explain how culture and gender influence behavior.

•  Identifying gender differences and similarities
•  Explaining ways in which gender differences are developed
•  Describing ways in which gender roles are assigned in different cultures
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Psychology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze how culture and gender influence behavior.
  • Explain differences among cultures and between genders.
  • Analyze how gender differences are inherent and are developed.
  • Explore how gender roles are assigned in various cultures.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • culture
  • norms
  • individualism
  • collectivism
  • interdependent
  • gender role
  • gender identity
  • gender schema theory
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The relative similarities and differences among cultures and between genders.
  • That culture and gender influence behavior and mental processes in a variety of ways.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Cite specific research-based evidence to support analysis of theories regarding culture and gender and their influence on behavior and mental processes.
  • Summarize complex theories regarding culture and gender into simpler, yet still accurate, terms.
  • Integrate research and information to address a key issue related to culture and/or gender and its influence on behavior and mental processes.
  • Synthesize research and evidence from multiple sources to provide a coherent understanding of key issues related to culture and gender and their influences on behavior and mental processes.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are ways in which culture and gender influence behavior.
  • There are differences between genders and among cultures.
  • There are ways in which gender is both inherent and environmentally influenced.
  • There are specific ways in which gender roles can be assigned in different cultures.
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9-12
Sociology
9 ) Explain the purpose of social systems and institutions, including schools, churches, voluntary associations, and governments.

•  Describing origins and beliefs of various religions
•  Distinguishing among the concepts of power, coercion, and authority
•  Comparing charismatic, traditional, and rational-legal authority
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the purpose of social systems and institutions.
  • Differentiate among the origins and beliefs of various religions.
  • Distinguish among the concepts of power, coercion, and authority.
  • Compare different types of authority.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • social systems
  • social institutions
  • schools
  • churches
  • voluntary associations
  • governments
  • power
  • coercion
  • authority
  • charismatic authority
  • traditional authority
  • rational-legal authority
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The different types of social systems and institutions.
  • The many different religious traditions.
  • The definitions of power, coercion and authority.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Discussing the purpose of social institutions.
  • Demonstrating understanding of various religious traditions.
  • Distinguishing among types of power and authority.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are important but different social institutions.
  • There are many impacts of different social institutions.
  • There are many different origins and beliefs of different religious traditions.
  • There can be specific impacts of power, coercion, and authority.
  • There are many different types of authority.
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9-12
Sociology
10 ) Describe social movement and social change.

•  Comparing various forms of collective behavior, including mobs, riots, fads, and crowds
•  Identifying major ethical and social issues facing modern society
Examples: technological, governmental, medical

•  Explaining the impact of the modern Civil Rights Movement, the women's movement, the gun rights movement, the green movement, and other minority movements in the United States
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the impact of different social movements throughout history.
  • Compare various forms of collective behavior.
  • Analyze the causes and effects of ethical and social issues facing modern society.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • social movement
  • social change
  • collective behavior
  • mobs
  • riots
  • fads
  • crowds
  • Civil Rights movement
  • women's movement
  • gun rights movement
  • green movement
  • other minority movements
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The many historical movements related to social issues.
  • Several examples of collective behavior.
  • The ethical issues facing modern society.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Discuss the factors leading to various social movements.
  • Understand how collective behavior works.
  • Analyze ethical and social issues facing modern society.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There have been many factors influencing the development of various social movements throughout history.
  • There are many examples of how collective behavior has worked.
  • There are a variety of dilemmas involved in the different social and ethical issues facing modern society.
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9-12
Contemporary World Issues and Civic Engagement
5 ) Analyze cultural elements, including language, art, music, literature, and belief systems, to determine how they facilitate global understanding or misunderstanding.

Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Contemporary World Issues and Civic Engagement
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze elements of cultures from countries around the world including various languages, pieces of art; music; literature, and differing beliefs systems.
  • Provide an argument with strong evidence for or against how cultural elements can facilitate a better global understanding or cause a misunderstanding between nations and cultures.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • global understanding
  • cultural elements
  • evidence
  • analyze
  • belief system
  • globalization
  • perspective
  • diversity
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The elements that form a culture.
  • Differing cultures around the world.
  • Culture conflicts throughout history.
  • The meaning of globalization as well as how globalization has provided a need and an avenue for global/cultural understanding.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Analyze elements of culture using a variety of techniques.
  • Support analysis with global perspective of culture.
  • Identify cultures throughout the world through locating.
  • Form an argument with evidence to determine if cultural elements facilitate global understanding or misunderstanding.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Cultural elements facilitate global understanding or misunderstanding for any given culture.
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9-12
Human Geography
3 ) Identify the characteristics, distribution, and complexity of Earth's cultural mosaics.

•  Explaining essential aspects of culture, including social structure, languages, belief systems, customs, religion, traditions, art, food, architecture, and technology
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Human Geography
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Discuss the essential components that make-up culture and the role culture plays in the human mosaic.
  • Map major cultural regions of the world.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • characteristics
  • distribution
  • complexity
  • cultural
  • mosaics
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How the belief systems, languages, social structure, customs, traditions, art, food, architecture, and technology all shape culture.
  • The role of popular culture and the impact it has on local culture.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare and contrast differing cultures around the world.
  • Identify the role that belief systems, languages, social structure, customs, traditions, art, food, architecture, and technology have in shaping culture.
  • Identify major cultural regions of the world.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are essential components that make-up culture.
  • Culture plays an important role in the human mosaic.
Tags: belief systems, changing role of women, customs, Niagara Movement, traditions
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AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
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Author: Ginger Boyd