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Grade 1 Mathematics Module 4, Topic A

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Grade 1 Mathematics Module 4, Topic A

URL:

https://www.engageny.org/resource/grade-1-mathematics-module-4-topic-a

Content Source:

EngageNY
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

Module 4 builds on students’ work with teen numbers to now work within 40. Working within 40 helps students focus on the units, tens and ones, which can be easily modeled pictorially and concretely with these smaller numbers. The smaller numbers also allow students to count all while having an important experience of its inefficiency. Students’ innate ability to subitize to 4 keeps the numbers friendly when both adding and subtracting tens for the first time and managing the new, complex task of considering both tens and ones when adding. Through their work within 40, students develop essential skills and concepts that generalize easily to numbers to 100 in Module 6. In Lesson 1, students are presented with a collection of 20 to 40 items. They discuss and decide how to count the items, and then compare the efficiency of counting individual ones with counting tens and ones. Through this exploration, students come to understand the utility of ten as a unit: both as a method for counting, and for efficiently recording a given number. Students keep their own set of 40 linking cubes, organized as a kit of 4 ten-sticks, to use as they progress through the module. In Lesson 2, students represent and decompose two-digit numbers as tens and ones, and record their findings on a place value chart, supported by the familiar Hide Zero cards. Students share thoughts such as, “The 3 in 34 stands for 3 tens. And the 4 in 34 is just 4 ones!” Up to this point, students have worked with representations of ten where 10 ones are clearly visible (e.g., as two 5-groups). While the digit 3 in 34 may appear smaller than the digit 4, its value is determined by its position. The use of the place value chart represents the students’ first experience with this additional layer of abstraction. Lesson 3 allows students to explore two-digit numbers as tens and ones, and as just ones. Students use their fingers to represent “bundled” tens and “unbundled” ones by clasping and unclasping their fingers. For example, students model 34 with 3 students showing their hands clasped to make a ten, and a fourth student showing 4 fingers to represent 4 ones. Taking student understanding of place value a step further, Lesson 4 asks students to decompose and compose two-digit numbers as addition equations. Students develop an understanding that “34 is the same as 30 + 4,” as they move between writing the number when given the equations and writing the equations when given a number. Throughout these lessons, students use concrete objects and/or drawings in order to support their understanding and explain their thinking. Topic A concludes with Lessons 5 and 6, where students use materials and drawings to find 10 more, 10 less, 1 more, and 1 less than a given number. In Lesson 5, students use the familiar linking cubes (organized into tens) and 5-group columns. They engage in conversation about patterns they observe, “I see that 10 less than 34 is just 1 less ten, so it must be 24!” Students represent how the number changed using arrow notation, or the arrow way, as shown to the right. Lesson 6 then introduces the dime and penny as representations of ten and one respectively. Students make the connection between the familiar representations of tens and ones to the dime and the penny, and work to find 10 more, 10 less, 1 more, and 1 less.

Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 1
11. Explain that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.
a. Identify a bundle of ten ones as a "ten."

b. Identify the numbers from 11 to 19 as composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

c. Identify the numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 as one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use a variety of representations (symbolic: 10+8. pictorial: one line and 8 dots. physical: place value blocks, bundles of sticks, or groups of fingers, etc.) to show and explain the decomposition of the number into groups of 10 and ones.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Base ten
  • Decompose
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to decompose numbers 11-19.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use place value models or mental strategies to decompose numbers.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a two-digit number represents amounts of tens and ones.
  • Ten things can be represented as one ten or as ten ones.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.11.1: Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
M.1.11.2: Represent numbers with multiple models.
Examples: models—base ten blocks, number lines, linking cubes, straw bundles.
M.1.11.3: Count to 100 by tens.
M.1.11.4: Count 10 objects.
M.1.11.5: Count to 10 by ones.
M.1.11.6: Name numerals 0 to 19.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Define ones and tens.
  • Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
  • Add numbers 1-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
  • Count objects up to 10.
  • Notice same/different and some/all.
  • Recognize numbers from 1-50.
  • Add one to a set of objects (up to 10 objects).
  • Given small groups of objects, create larger groups by combining the small groups.
  • Understand ten and 1 (ten 1's =10).
  • Put together two small groups of objects to create a larger group.
  • Understand number words.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture a drawing or objects.
  • Rote count to 10.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.11 Recognize and create sets of ten (limit to three sets).


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 1
15. Subtract multiples of 10 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (positive or zero differences), using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. Relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • subtract multiples of 10 from more tens using concrete models, drawings, and written equations.
  • look for and describe patterns they find.
  • explain their reasoning using place value and patterns.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Multiple of 10
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • place value models for adding and subtracting numbers less than 100.
  • strategies for adding and subtracting multiples of 10.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use models and strategies to find and record solutions to problems where a multiple of 10 is subtracted.
  • explain their strategies.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • patterns in the place value system can be used to mentally compute sums and differences.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.15.1: Demonstrate conceptual understanding of subtraction using concrete models.
M.1.15.2: Model written method for recording problems involving subtraction of 10 from multiples of 10.
M.1.15.3: Count backward from 100 by tens.
M.1.15.4: Count forward to 100 by tens. M 1.15.5: Mimic counting to 100 by tens.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Define subtraction as separating groups of objects.
  • Represent numbers with objects or drawings.
  • Separate sets with nine or fewer objects.
  • Combine objects to form sets up to nine.
  • Notice same/different and some/all.
  • Subtract one from a set of objects (up to five objects).
  • Given a group of objects (ten or less), divide the group into smaller groups in various ways.
  • Take away objects from a large group to create two smaller groups.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture a drawing or objects.
  • Understand number words.
  • Understand that 10 1's = 10.
  • Count forward to 50 by tens.
  • Count backwards from 50 by tens.
  • Mimic counting to 50 by tens.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.13 Compose and decompose numbers from 1 to 15 into one ten and ones using objects, drawings, or pictures.


Tags: concrete models, drawings, ones, place value, tens, two digits
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There are six lessons in this topic.

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Author: Hannah Bradley