ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Oral Blending and Segmentation Activities

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Oral Blending and Segmentation Activities

URL:

https://www.readingrockets.org/content/pdfs/dodea_m1_tr_blendseg.pdf

Content Source:

Other
Scholastic
Type: Learning Activity

Overview:

This learning activity provides teachers with information on how to conduct a segmentation cheer activity. Educators can write the "Segmentation Cheer" on chart paper, and teach it to children. Each time you say the cheer, change the words in the third line. Have children segment the word sound by sound. Begin with words that have three phonemes, such as tenratcatdogsoapread, and fish.

Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: K
9. Demonstrate early phonological awareness to basic phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.

a. Count the number of words in a spoken sentence.

b. Recognize alliterative spoken words.

c. Recognize and produce pairs of rhyming words and distinguish them from non-rhyming pairs using pictures and/or spoken words.

d. Count, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words, including compound words.

e. Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.

f. Identify the initial, final, and medial sounds of spoken words.

g. Blend and segment phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to four phonemes.

h. Distinguish between commonly confused cognate consonant sounds, using knowledge of voiced and unvoiced sounds and manner of articulation.

Examples: /t/ and /d/, /p/ and /b/, /ch/ and /j/, /s/ and /z/, /f/ and /v/, /k/ and /g/, /sh/ and /zh/, /th/ (voiced and unvoiced)

Note: Standard 9 is important as a foundational phonemic awareness skill for all learners.
Unpacked Content
Key Academic Terms:
9.
  • Demonstrate
  • Early phonological awareness skills
  • Basic phonemic awareness skills
  • Spoken words
9a.
  • Count
  • Sentence
9b.
  • Alliteration
  • Beginning sound
  • Phonemes
9c.
  • Rhyming words
  • Non-rhyming pairs
9d.
  • Blend
  • Segment
  • Syllable
  • Compound words
9e.
  • Blend
  • Segment
  • Onset
  • Rime
  • Single-syllable
9f.
  • Identify
  • Initial sound
  • Final sound
  • Medial sound
  • Spoken word
9g.
  • Blend
  • Segment
  • Phonemes
  • Single-syllable
9h.
  • Distinguish
  • Cognate consonant sounds
  • Voiced
  • Unvoiced
  • Articulation
Knowledge:
9. Students know:
  • Early phonological awareness skills.
  • Basic phonemic awareness skills.
9a.
  • That spoken sentences are composed of individual words.
9b.
  • That alliterative words begin with the same sound.
9c.
  • Rhyming words.
  • Non-rhyming words.
9d.
  • A word is made up of one or more syllables.
  • Syllables in spoken words are made of a sequence of sounds.
  • Compound words have more than one syllable.
9e.
  • The "onset" is the initial phonological unit of any word (e.g., c in cat).
  • The term "rime" refers to the string of letters that follow the onset, usually a vowel and final consonants (e.g., at in cat).
9f.
  • Spoken words have an initial, final, and medial sound.
9g.
  • Phonemes are individual speech sounds.
  • Single-syllable spoken words are composed of a combination of phonemes.
  • Individual phonemes can be blended to create a complete spoken word or a spoken word can be segmented into its individual phonemes.
9h.
  • Consonant sounds are produced by using different places and manners of articulation.
Skills:
9. Students are able to:
  • Demonstrate early phonological awareness to basic phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.
9a.
  • Count the number of words in a spoken sentence.
9b.
  • Recognize when spoken words begin with the same sound.
9c. Using pictures and/or spoken words,
  • Recognize pairs of rhyming words.
  • Produce pairs of rhyming words.
  • Distinguish non-rhyming words from rhyming words.
9d.
  • Count syllables in spoken words, including compound words.
  • Blend syllables in spoken words, including compound words.
  • Segment syllables in spoken words, including compound words.
9e.
  • Blend a spoken onset and rime to make a complete single-syllable word.
  • Segment a single-syllable spoken word into its onset and rime.
9f. In spoken words,
  • Identify the initial sound.
  • Identify the final sound.
  • Identify the medial sound.
9g.
  • Blend three to four phonemes to make a single-syllable spoken word.
  • Segment a single-syllable spoken word into three to four phonemes.
9h.
  • Distinguish between commonly confused cognate consonant sounds by using their knowledge of voiced sounds, unvoiced sounds, and each sound's place and manner of articulation.
Understanding:
9. Students understand that:
  • The sounds of spoken language work together to make words.
9a.
  • Sentences are made up of individual words.
9b.
  • Alliterative words are two or more adjacent or closely connected words that begin with the same sound.
9c.
  • Words that rhyme have the same vowel and ending sound.
9d.
  • A syllable is a unit of speech that is organized around a vowel sound, so all syllables must have at least one vowel.
9e.
  • The "onset" is the initial phonological unit of any word (e.g., c in cat) and the term "rime" refers to the string of letters that follow, usually a vowel and final consonants (e.g., at in cat).
  • An onset and rime can be blended to make one complete single-syllable word, or a single-syllable spoken word can be segmented into its onset and rime.
9f.
  • Spoken words have initial (first), final (last), and medial (middle) sounds.
9g.
  • Blending is the ability to hear each individual sound in a word, join the sounds together, and produce the word.
  • Segmenting is the ability to break a word down into its individual sounds.
9h.
  • The knowledge of voiced and unvoiced consonant sounds, in addition to their place and manner of articulation, is required for the proper pronunciation of spoken words and the accurate decoding and encoding of written words.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 1
6. Demonstrate basic to advanced phonological and phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.

a. Count, blend, segment, and delete syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.

Examples: par-ti-cu-lar, cer-ti-fi-cate

b. Recognize and produce groups of rhyming words and distinguish them from non-rhyming groups of spoken words.

c. Produce alliterative words.

d. Blend and segment phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, including words with consonant blends.

e. Add, delete, and substitute phonemes at the beginning or end of spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, and produce the resulting word.

Examples: pan to pant; flight to light; cat to cap

f. Distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken, single-syllable words.

g. Distinguish between commonly-confused vowel sounds and commonly-confused cognate consonant sounds, using knowledge of mouth position, voiced and unvoiced sounds, and manner of articulation.

Examples: /f/ and /v/, /p/ and /b/, /t/ and /d/, /k/ and /g/, /m/ and /n/, /ng/ and /n/, /s/ and /z/, unvoiced /th/ and voiced /th/, /ch/ and /sh/, /ĕ/ and /ā/, /ĕ/ and /ă/

Note: This is extremely important as a foundational phonemic awareness skill for all learners.

h. Identify the sound substitution in words with five to six phonemes.

Example: strips/straps, square/squire
Unpacked Content
Key Academic Terms:
6.
  • Demonstrate
  • Phonological awareness skills
  • Phonemic awareness skills
  • Spoken words
6a.
  • Count
  • Blend
  • Segment
  • Delete
  • Syllables
  • Spoken words
  • Polysyllabic words
6b.
  • Recognize
  • Produce
  • Rhyming words
  • Distinguish
  • Non-rhyming
6c.
  • Alliterative
6d.
  • Blend
  • Segment
  • Phonemes
  • Single-syllable spoken words
  • Consonant blends
6e.
  • Add
  • Delete
  • Substitute
  • Phonemes
6f.
  • Vowel
  • Long Vowel Sound
  • Short Vowel Sound
  • Single-syllable spoken words
6g.
  • Distinguish
  • Vowel sounds
  • Cognate consonant sounds
  • Mouth position
  • Voiced sounds
  • Unvoiced sounds
  • Articulation
6h.
  • Substitution
  • Phonemes
Knowledge:
6. Students know:
  • Basic to advanced phonological and phonemic awareness skills.
6a.
  • Syllables in spoken words.
  • Polysyllabic words.
6b.
  • The features of rhyming words.
  • The features of non-rhyming words.
6c.
  • The features of alliterative words.
6d.
  • Phonemes in single-syllable spoken words.
  • Consonant blends.
6e.
  • Phonemes in single-syllable spoken words.
  • Phonemes in spoken words can be manipulated.
6f.
  • Long vowel sounds.
  • Short vowel sounds.
6g.
  • Vowel sounds.
  • Cognate consonant sounds.
  • The mouth position, voicing, and manner of articulation of speech sounds.
6h.
  • Sound substitution.
Skills:
6. Students are able to:
  • Demonstrate basic to advanced phonological and phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.
6a.
  • Count syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
  • Blend syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
  • Segment syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
  • Delete syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
6b.
  • Recognize groups of rhyming words.
  • Produce groups of rhyming words.
  • Distinguish groups of non-rhyming words from groups of rhyming words.
6c.
  • Produce alliterative words.
6d.
  • Blend phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, including words with consonant blends.
  • Segment phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, including words with consonant blends.
6e. Using spoken words made up of three to five phonemes,
  • Add phonemes at the beginning or end of a word and produce the resulting word, such as changing pan to pant.
  • Delete phonemes at the beginning or end of a word to produce the resulting word, such as changing flight to light.
  • Substitute phonemes at the beginning or end to produce the resulting word, such as changing cat to cap.
6f.
  • Identify long vowel sounds.
  • Identify short vowel sounds.
  • Distinguish between long and short vowel sounds in spoken words.
6g.
  • Using knowledge of mouth position, voiced and unvoiced sounds, and manner of articulation, distinguish between commonly-confused vowel sounds and cognate consonant sounds.
6h.
  • In words with five to six phonemes, identify sound substitutions, such as identifying the vowel sound changed in the word pair strips/straps.
Understanding:
6. Students understand that:
  • Being able to identify and manipulate the sounds in spoken words will help improve their reading, spelling, and writing abilities.
6a.
  • Being able to to identify and manipulate syllables in spoken words will help improve their reading, spelling, and writing abilities.
6b.
  • Words that rhyme have the same vowel and ending sound.
6c.
  • Alliterative words begin with the same sound.
6d.
  • Blending is the ability to hear the individual sounds in a spoken word, join the sounds together, and produce the word.
  • Segmenting is the ability to break words down into their individual sounds.
6e.
  • Adding, deleting, and substituting phonemes at the beginning or end of spoken words changes the resulting word.
6f.
  • One letter can make different sounds depending on its context.
  • When a letter makes the sound of its letter name, it is considered a long vowel.
  • When a letter makes a sound other than its name, it is considered a short vowel.
6g.
  • The knowledge of mouth position, voiced and unvoiced sounds, and manner of articulation is required for the proper pronunciation of words.
  • The ability to distinguish commonly-confused sounds will help them become better readers, spellers, and writers.
6h.
  • A word's meaning and pronunciation will be altered if one sound is changed.
Tags: blending, segmentation
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Author: Ginger Boyd