ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Prefix-Suffix Bingo

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Prefix-Suffix Bingo

URL:

https://www.jumpstart.com/common/prefix-suffix-bingo-view

Content Source:

Other
jumpstart.com
Type: Interactive/Game

Overview:

This fun, bingo-style game will help students practice and reinforce their knowledge of root words, prefixes, and suffixes. ‘Prefix-Suffix Bingo’ requires students to form words with either a suffix or a prefix. Similar to the popular game of Bingo, but with a twist, this activity is sure to excite students and teach them prefixes and suffixes in the process.

Prior to playing this review game, students should know the concepts of root words, prefixes, and suffixes. This game will encourage students to analyze morphemes in words to determine the word's meaning in an engaging manner.

Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 3
15. Analyze meaningful parts (morphemes) of words and phrases in discussions and/or text.

a. Identify meaningful parts of words (morphemes) and use them as clues to the meaning of unfamiliar words, including base words, roots, and frequently occurring affixes and inflections.

Examples: affixes -less, -ful, pro-, trans- ; roots aqua, cent, port, form, ject, spect, dict, tend, fer

b. Apply knowledge of the changes in tense (-ed), number (-s), and degree (-er and -est) signified by inflected endings to determine the meaning of a word.

c. Identify common and derivational prefixes and suffixes and use them as clues to a word's meaning.

Examples: pre-, re-, mis-; -ly, -less, -ful, -able, -ment

d. Identify common Latin and Greek roots and use them to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words.

e. Sort words with shared and varied suffixes by parts of speech.
Unpacked Content
Key Academic Terms:
15.
  • Analyze
  • Meaningful parts
  • Morphemes
  • Words
  • Phrases
15a.
  • Meaningful parts of words
  • Morphemes
  • Clues
  • Unfamiliar words
  • Base words
  • Roots
  • Affixes
  • Inflections
15b.
  • Knowledge
  • Tense
  • Number
  • Degree
  • Inflected endings
  • Determine
15c.
  • Identify
  • Common and derivational prefixes
  • Common and derivational suffixes
15d.
  • Identify
  • Common Latin roots
  • Common Greek roots
  • Determine
15e.
  • Sort
  • Suffixes
  • Parts of speech
Knowledge:
15. Students know:
  • Morphemes are the smallest unit in a word that carry meaning.
  • Words and phrases can be divided into morphemes to identify the meaning of the word or phrase.
15a.
  • Morphemes are the smallest unit in a word that carry meaning.
  • Morphemes can be used to determine meanings of words.
  • Affixes and inflections can be added to words to change their meaning.
15b.
  • Inflected endings are added to words to show that a word's meaning has changed in tense, number, or degree.
15c.
  • Prefixes and suffixes change a word's meaning.
15d.
  • Many English words and English morphemes originated from ancient Latin and Greek languages.
  • Understanding Latin and Greek roots can provide clues to meanings of unknown words.
15e.
  • Suffixes are word parts that are added to the ends of words.
  • Parts of speech are words that can be categorized by their function in a sentence.
  • Different parts of speech require different types of suffixes.
Skills:
15. Students are able to:
  • Identify and analyze morphemes of words and phrases in discussions and/or text.
15a.
  • Identify morphemes and use them as clues to determine word meaning, including affixes like -less, -ful, pro-, trans- and roots like aqua, cent, port, form, ject, spect, dict, tend, fer.
15b.
  • Apply knowledge of inflectional endings to determine meaning of words.
15c.
  • Identify common and derivational prefixes, such as pre-, re-, mis-, and use them as clues to learn a word's meaning.
  • Identify common and derivational suffixes, such as -ly, -less, -ful, -able, -ment, and use them as clues to learn a word's meaning.
15d.
  • Identify and use Latin and Greek roots as clues to the meaning of a word.
15e.
  • Sort words with suffixes by parts of speech.
Understanding:
15. Students understand that:
  • Morphemes are meaningful word parts, and they can help find the meaning of unfamiliar words.
15a.
  • Base words, roots, affixes, inflections and other morphemes can be used to help find the meaning of unfamiliar words.
15b.
  • When a word has an inflected ending, the meaning of the base word has changed.
  • When an -ed is added to a verb, it signifies the verb happened in the past.
  • When an -s is added to a noun, it signifies the noun is plural (more than one).
  • When an -er or -est is added to the end of an adjective it changes the degree of comparison.
15c.
  • Prefixes and suffixes change a word's meaning.
15d.
  • The meaning of an unknown word can be learned by knowing the orthography of the word, including its origin.
15e.
  • When a suffix is added to the end of a word, it changes the meaning of the word.
  • Each part of speech provides a different type of information.
  • Words can be categorized by parts of speech.
  • English orthography dictates that only particular suffixes can be added to each part of speech.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 3
32. Apply knowledge of grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences, multisyllabic word construction, syllable division rules, and spelling rules (or generalizations) to encode words accurately.

a. Apply knowledge of multisyllabic word construction and syllable division principles to encode multisyllabic words.

Examples: VC/CV, V/CV, VC/V, CV/VC; com-mit-ment, e-vent, ev-er-y, po-et

b. Encode multisyllabic words, using common syllable patterns: open/closed, vowel-r, vowel-consonant-e, vowel teams, consonant-le, and odd or schwa syllables.

c. Encode words with two and three letter blends and previously taught digraphs, trigraphs, combinations, diphthongs, quadrigraph eigh, vowel y, hard and soft c and g, silent letter combinations, and contractions.

d. Encode words with less common prefixes, suffixes, and common Latin roots.

Examples: prefixes: fore-, pro-, intra-, inter-, trans-, non-, over-, sub-, super-, semi-, anti-, mid-, ex-, post-
suffixes: -y, -ly, -ful, -ment, -hood, -less, -ness, -er, -or, -en
Latin roots: port, form, ject, spect, dict, tend, fer

e. Encode frequently confused homophones accurately, using context to determine correct spelling.

Examples: hear/here; night/knight; tacks/tax
Unpacked Content
Key Academic Terms:
32.
  • Knowledge
  • Grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Multisyllabic word construction
  • Syllable division rules
  • Spelling rules
  • Generalizations
  • Encode
  • Accurately
32a.
  • Apply
  • Knowledge
  • Multisyllabic word construction
  • Syllable division principles
  • Encode
  • Multisyllabic words
32b.
  • Encode
  • Multisyllabic words
  • Common syllable patterns
  • Open syllable
  • Closed syllable
  • vowel-r syllable
  • Vowel-consonant-e syllable
  • Vowel team syllable
  • Consonant-le syllable
  • Odd syllable
  • Schwa syllable
32c.
  • Encode
  • Two letter blends
  • Three letter blends
  • Digraphs
  • Trigraphs
  • Combinations
  • Diphthongs
  • Quadrigraph eigh
  • Hard and soft c
  • Hard and soft g
  • Silent letter combinations
  • Contractions
32d.
  • Encode
  • Prefixes
  • Suffixes
  • Common Latin roots
32e.
  • Encode
  • Frequently confused homophones
  • Context
Knowledge:
32. Students know:
  • Grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
  • Multisyllabic words are words that are composed of two or more syllables.
  • Syllable division principles.
  • Spelling rules (or generalizations).
  • To encode accurately means to spell a word correctly.
32a.
  • Multisyllabic words can be constructed by combining syllables.
  • Syllable division principles help divide words into parts with one vowel sound based on predictable patterns.
32b.
  • Accurate encoding of multisyllabic words requires knowledge of common syllable types.
  • Syllable patterns are principles that help divide words into parts with one vowel sound that can be easily spelled.
32c.
  • Two letter blends are a combination of two consonants in which each represents a phoneme sound.
  • Three letter blends are a combination of three consonants in which each represents a phoneme sound.
  • Digraphs are two letter combination that represents a single phoneme sound in which neither letter represents its usual sound.
  • Trigraphs are three letter combinations that represents a single phoneme sound.
  • Combinations are two letters that frequently appear together and have an associated phoneme.
  • Diphthongs are two vowels that represent a single vowel phonemes that glide in the middle.
  • Quadrigraph eigh is a combination of four letters that represents a single phoneme sound.
  • The letter y can represent three different vowel sounds depending on the number of syllables in the words and its position in a word.
  • The spelling generalizations associated with hard and soft c and g.
  • Silent letter combinations are letter combinations in which one or more letters is silent (does not represent a phoneme), but another letter does represent the phoneme.
  • Contractions are words that are combined, or shortened, and an apostrophe represents the omitted letters.
  • Skills:
    32. Students are able to:
    • Accurately encode (spell) single syllable and multisyllabic words using their knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences, multisyllabic word construction, syllable division principles, and spelling generalization.
    • Accurately divide words into syllables to spell multisyllabic words correctly.
    32a.
    • Encode multisyllabic words using knowledge of multisyllabic word construction and syllable division principles; for example, VC/CV, com-mit,ment; V/CV, e-vent; VC/V, ev-er-y; CV/VC, po-et.
    32b.
    • Encode words with more than one syllable using their knowledge of common syllable types: open, closed, vowel-r, vowel-consonant-e, vowel teams, consonant-le, odd, and schwa.
    32c.
    • Accurately encode words with previously taught letter patterns, such as two letter blends, three letter blends, digraphs, trigraphs, combinations, diphthongs, quadrigraph eigh, vowel y, hard and soft c and g, silent letter combinations, and contractions.
    32d.
    • Encode words with less common prefixes, such as fore-, pro-, intra-, inter-, trans-, non-, over-, sub-, super-, semi-, anti-, mid-, ex-, post-.
    • Encode words with less common suffixes, such as -y, -ly, -ful, -ment, -hood, -less, -ness, -er, -or, -en.
    • Encode words with common Latin roots, such as port, form, ject, spect, dict, tend, fer.
    32e.
    • Accurately encode homophones using context clues to determine the correct spelling; for example, hear/here, night/knight, tacks/tax.
    Understanding:
    32. Students understand that:
    • To spell (encode), they must accurately represent the letter symbols (graphemes) that correspond to the spoken sounds (phonemes).
    • They can use syllable division principles to break a word apart to make it easier to spell.
    • They can use their knowledge of the six syllable types to accurately encode words.
    • There are spelling rules, or generalizations, in the English language that can help them spell words accurately.
    32a.
    • Multisyllabic words are composed of more than one syllable.
    • They can write and spell words that are multisyllabic by dividing the word into syllables and spelling each syllable, then combining the individual syllables to construct complete word.
    32b.
    • They can encode (spell/write) multisyllabic words by dividing the words into syllables and applying their knowledge of syllable patterns.
    32c.
    • Knowing the sound-symbol correspondences of common letter patterns will help them encode (spell/write) words accurately.
    32d.
    • Their knowledge of the different word parts (prefixes, suffixes, and roots) can help them read and spell most multisyllabic words if they divide them apart into smaller units.
    • Knowing less common prefixes and suffixes and common Latin roots strengthens their spelling skills.
    32e.
    • Homophones are words that can be confused so it is important to pay attention to the word's meaning in context (whether in written text or oral conversation) to determine the correct spelling of the homophone.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 4
3. Apply knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes to decode unfamiliar multisyllabic words.
Unpacked Content
Key Academic Terms:
3.
  • Roots
  • Suffixes
  • Prefixes
  • Decode
  • Multisyllabic words
Knowledge:
3. Students know:
  • Prefixes are word parts that can be added to the beginning of a word.
  • Suffixes are word parts that can be added at the end of a word.
  • The root word is the base word in which a prefix or suffix can be added.
    Skills:
    3. Students are able to:
    • Decode (read) multisyllabic words using their knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes.
    Understanding:
    3. Students understand that:
    • Their knowledge of the different word parts (prefixes, suffixes, and roots) can help them read most multisyllabic words if they divide them apart into smaller units.
    Tags: Bingo, morpheme, multisyllabic words, prefix, root words, suffix
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    Author: YVETTE AKRIDGE