ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Short Vowels

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Short Vowels

URL:

https://www.jumpstart.com/common/short-vowels-view

Content Source:

Other
jumpstart.com
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

Once kids learn beginning consonant sounds and ending consonant sounds, it is time for them to move on to vowel sounds. As the name suggests, ‘Short Vowels’ is a reading lesson plan with free reading activities and worksheets to help the little ones learn all about short vowels. This lesson plan, comprising phonics worksheets and activities, teaches kids to identify the short vowel sounds in different words and tests them by making them fill in the missing short vowels in various words.

Click on Download PDF to access the entire lesson plan and accompanying materials.

Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: K
10. Apply knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences and word-analysis skills to decode and encode (spell) words accurately in both isolation and in decodable, grade-appropriate text.

a. Produce the most frequent sound(s) for each consonant, including x and q, which have two phonemes (sounds).

Examples: x= /ks/ and q=/kw/

b. Identify the vowel in a closed syllable and produce the short vowel sound for the five major vowels when decoding closed syllables.

c. Decode consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words in isolation and in decodable text.

d. Identify the vowel in an open syllable and produce the long vowel sound for the five major vowels when decoding open syllables.

e. With prompting and support, identify the vowel-consonant-e syllable pattern and produce the long vowel sounds for the five major vowels in vowel-consonant-e syllables.

f. With prompting and support, decode words with suffix -s, using knowledge of unvoiced /s/ and voiced /z/ sounds for letter s.

Examples: pups, cats, pigs, dogs

Note: Unvoiced /s/ follows unvoiced sounds such as /p/ and /t/ and voiced /z/ follows voiced sounds such as /g/.

g. With prompting and support, produce the most frequent sound for digraphs ck, sh, th, ch, wh, ng, and combination qu, making the connection that a two-letter grapheme can represent one phoneme (sound).

h. Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the phonemes and graphemes that differ.

Example: mat/sat, pan/pat, tip/top

i. Decode grade-appropriate high frequency words that are spelled using predictable, decodable phoneme-grapheme correspondences.

Examples: am, at, get, like, make, that, this, me, she, be

Note: The main emphasis of a high-frequency word lesson should be on regular correspondences and patterns, noting the high-frequency words with exceptions or oddities and what they are, using specific strategies to help them remember the irregular part of the word. Example: LETRS© heart word strategy
Unpacked Content
Key Academic Terms:
10.
  • Apply
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondence
  • Word-analysis skills
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Isolation
  • Decodable
  • Grade-appropriate text
10a.
  • Produce
  • Frequent
  • Consonant
  • Phoneme
10b.
  • Vowel
  • Closed syllable
  • Produce
  • Short vowel sound
  • Five major vowels
  • Decode
10c.
  • Decode
  • CVC words
  • Isolation
  • Decodable text
10d.
  • Vowel
  • Open syllable
  • Produce
  • Long-vowel sound
  • Five major vowels
  • Decode
10e.
  • Identify
  • Vowel-consonant-e syllable pattern
  • Produce
  • Long-vowel sound
  • Five major vowels
  • Prompting
  • Support
10f.
  • Decode
  • Suffix -s
  • Sounds of letter s
  • Unvoiced /s/
  • Voiced /z/
  • Prompting
  • Support
10g.
  • Produce
  • Most frequent sound
  • Digraph
  • Two-letter grapheme
  • Represent
  • Phoneme
  • Prompting
  • Support
10h.
  • Distinguish
  • Phonemes
  • Graphemes
10i.
  • Decode
  • High-frequency words
  • Predictable
  • Decodable
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences
Knowledge:
10. Students know:
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences and word-analysis skills to decode words.
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences and word-analysis skills to encode words.
10a.
  • The most common sound for each consonant letter.
    • 10b.
      • The five major vowels.
      • Short vowel sounds.
      • The features of closed syllables.
      10c.
      • Words with the CVC pattern.
      10d.
      • The five major vowels.
      • Long vowel sounds.
      • The features of open syllables.
      10e.
      • The five major vowels.
      • Long vowel sounds.
      • The features of vowel-consonant-e syllables.
      10f.
      • How to identify a word ending with an s or suffix -s.
      • Whether suffix is will be sounded as voiced /z/ or unvoiced /s/ based on the sound before it.
      10g.
      • The most frequent sound for digraphs ck, sh, th, ch, wh, and ng.
      • The sound for combination qu.
      10h.
      • How to identify the grapheme and/or phoneme that differs in similarly spelled words.
      10i.
      • Predictable and decodable phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
Skills:
10. Students are able to:
  • Decode words in isolation and within decodable, grade-appropriate text by applying knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences and by using word-analysis skills.
  • Encode words by applying knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences and using word-analysis skills.
10a.
  • Identify consonant letters.
  • Produce the most common consonant sounds, including x and q.
10b.
  • Identify the vowel in a closed syllable when decoding.
  • Produce the short vowel sound for the five major vowels when decoding closed syllables.
10c.
  • Decode CVC words in isolation and in decodable text.
10d.
  • Identify the vowel in an open syllable when decoding.
  • Produce the long-vowel sound for the five major vowels when decoding open syllables.
10e. With prompting and support,
  • Identify the vowel-consonant-e syllable pattern.
  • Produce the long-vowel sounds for the five major vowels in vowel-consonant-e syllables.
10f. With prompting and support,
  • Decode words with suffix -s, using knowledge of unvoiced /s/ and voiced /z/ sounds for letter s.
10g. With prompting and support,
  • Produce the most frequent sound for digraphs ck, sh, th, ch, wh, and ng.
  • Produce the combination qu sound.
  • Begin making the connection that a two-letter grapheme can represent one phoneme (sound).
10h.
  • Identify the phonemes (sounds) and graphemes (letters) that differ in similarly spelled words. For example, in the word pair mat/sat, a student could identify the first letter changed which changed the word's first sound.
10i.
  • Decode grade-appropriate high-frequency words that are spelled using predictable, decodable phoneme-grapheme correspondences, such as am, at, get, like, make, that, this, me, she, be.
Understanding:
10. Students understand that:
  • Graphemes represent specific phonemes they can use to decode (read) words, and phonemes can be represented by graphemes to encode (spell) words.
  • Word-analysis skills are used to determine how to decode or encode based on letter position, adjacent letters, etc.
10a. Students understand that:
  • Consonants are the letters in the alphabet that are not vowels, such as b, d, g, n, r, s, and t. Consonant sounds are made by blocking air using your teeth, tongue, or lips.
  • The consonants x and q make two sounds when decoding text.
10b.
  • a, e, i, o, and u are the five major vowels.
  • Vowels are voiced phonemes that are produced with no blocking of air with your mouth.
  • Every syllable must have a vowel.
  • A closed syllable is a syllable with a short vowel sound and one or more consonants at the end.
10c.
  • CVC words follow predictable patterns that they can be used to decode accurately and automatically.
10d.
  • a, e, i, o, and u are the five major vowels, and they can make different sounds depending on their placement in a syllable.
  • An open syllable is a syllable that ends with one vowel.
10e.
  • Vowel-consonant-e syllables contain one vowel, followed by a single consonant, and then the letter e.
  • The vowel sound is long and the e is silent.
10f.
  • When suffix -s is after an unvoiced consonant, it makes the unvoiced /s/ sound, like in the words pups or cats.
  • When suffix -s is after an voiced consonant, it makes the voiced /z/ sound, like in the words pigs and dogs.
10g.
  • The digraphs ck, sh, th, ch, wh, ng, and qu are made of two graphemes (letters) and represent one phoneme (sound).
  • Combination qu represents two unexpected speech sounds, /k/ and /w/.
10h.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: K
35. Apply knowledge of grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences and spelling rules (or generalizations) to encode words accurately.

a. Encode at the phoneme level, using the most common grapheme/spelling(s), for a spoken phoneme (sound).

Examples: /b/=b, /m/=m, /k/=k, c, -ck

b. With prompting and support, encode vowel-consonant (VC) and consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words, while using some knowledge of basic position-based rules for spelling English words.

Examples: /k/=k before i, e, or y; /k/= c before a, o, u, or any consonant; /k/= -ck after an accented short vowel

c. With prompting and support, encode grade-appropriate high frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences.

Examples: am, at, can, he, we, be, in, it, came, like

d. With prompting and support, encode grade-appropriate high frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences and patterns in all but one position, pointing out the part of the word that does not follow the regular pattern.

Example: In said, /s/ and /d/ are spelled using phoneme-grapheme correspondence, but ai must be learned by heart or memorized.
Unpacked Content
Key Academic Terms:
35.
  • Knowledge
  • Grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Spelling rules
  • Generalizations
  • Encode
  • Accurately
35a.
  • Encode
  • Phoneme level
  • Most common grapheme/spelling(s)
  • Spoken phoneme
35b.
  • Encode
  • Vowel-consonant words
  • Consonant-vowel-consonant words
  • Knowledge
  • Position-based rules for spelling
  • English words
  • Prompting
  • Support
35c.
  • Encode
  • Grade-appropriate high-frequency words
  • Regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Prompting
  • Support
35d.
  • Encode
  • Grade-appropriate high-frequency words
  • Regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Patterns
  • Position
  • Regular pattern
  • Prompting
  • Support
Knowledge:
35. Students know:
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
  • Spelling rules (or generalizations).
35a.
  • Phonemes (individual sound in a word).
  • Common grapheme/spelling(s) associated with phonemes.
35b.
  • Vowel-consonant (VC) and consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words.
  • Basic position-based rules for spelling English words.
35c.
  • Grade-appropriate high-frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences, such as am, at, can, he, we, be, in it, came, like.
35d.
  • Grade-appropriate high-frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences in all but one position, such as in the word said, /s/ and /d/ are spelled using regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences, but ai is not, so it must be learned by heart or memorized.
Skills:
35. Students are able to:
  • Encode (spell) words accurately by applying knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences and spelling rules.
35a.
  • Encode using a grapheme(s)/spelling(s) that corresponds with a sound (phoneme), such as /b/=b, /m/=m, /k/=k, c, -ck.
35b. With prompting and support,
  • Accurately spell vowel-consonant (VC) and consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words.
35c. With prompting and support,
  • Encode grade-appropriate high-frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
35d. With prompting and support,
  • Spell grade-appropriate high-frequency words using their knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences and irregular spelling patterns.
Understanding:
35. Students understand that:
  • They can use spelling generalizations/rules, syllable division principles, and their knowledge of letters and sounds to spell words accurately.
35a.
  • A spoken sound (phoneme) can be represented with a grapheme(s) (written symbol) to accurately encode (spell) words.
35b.
  • There are rules and patterns that can help them to accurately encode (spell) vowel-consonant and consonant-vowel-consonant words.
35c.
  • High-frequency words are words that they will use often in writing, so they must learn to write them quickly and accurately.
35d.
  • They can spell words by using a variety of strategies which include letter and sound relationships, predictable spellings, and their knowledge of irregularly spelled high-frequency words.
Tags: decode, encode, matching, phonics, short vowels, vowels, worksheet
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Author: YVETTE AKRIDGE