ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Prohibition Primary Sources

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Prohibition Primary Sources

URL:

https://sheg.stanford.edu/history-lessons/prohibition

Content Source:

Other
Stanford Education Group
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

In this lesson, students will examine sources from a period known as Prohibition when the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcoholic beverages was outlawed nationwide to answer the question: What were arguments for prohibition? Students will read sections of the 18th Amendment, then analyze four other primary documents about Prohibition to answer the essential question. Students will then write a structured paragraph that answers the Central Historical Question.

The website includes lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, primary source documents, and student graphic organizers. Teachers will need to create a free account to access the materials. 

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 6
United States Studies: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
2 ) Describe reform movements and changing social conditions during the Progressive Era in the United States.

•  Relating countries of origin and experiences of new immigrants to life in the United States
Example: Ellis Island and Angel Island experiences

•  Identifying workplace reforms, including the eight-hour workday, child labor laws, and workers' compensation laws
•  Identifying political reforms of Progressive movement leaders, including Theodore Roosevelt and the establishment of the national park system
•  Identifying social reforms of the Progressive movement, including efforts by Jane Adams, Clara Barton, and Julia Tutwiler (Alabama)
•  Recognizing goals of the early civil rights movement and the purpose of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
•  Explaining Progressive movement provisions of the Sixteenth, Seventeenth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twenty-first Amendments to the Constitution of the United States
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Studies: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe reform movements and changes in social conditions during the Progressive Era in the U.S.
  • Relate experiences of new immigrants.
  • Identify working conditions before and after workplace reforms.
  • Identify leaders associated with specific political and social reforms.
  • Recognize goals of the early Civil Rights Movement.
  • Explain key details of the Progressive Movement in specific amendments to the Constitution.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • immigrants
  • reforms
  • movements
  • 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, and 21st amendments origin
  • Progressive Movement
  • Populists
  • temperance
  • trustbuster
  • muckraker
  • repeal
  • Homestead Act
  • child labor
  • corporation
  • civil rights
  • Ellis Island
  • Angel Island
  • workman's compensation
  • Civil Rights Movement
  • NAACP
Knowledge:
Students will know:
  • Immigrant experiences at Ellis Island and Angel Island. Workplace reforms that took place during the Progressive Era (i.e., 8 hour work day, child labor laws, and workman compensation laws).
  • Key leaders of the Progressive Era that contributed to reforms in the United States (Theodore Roosevelt-National Parks System, Jane Adams-Hull House, Clara Barton-American Red Cross, Julia Tutwiler-Education/Prison Reform).
  • Social reforms of the Progressive Movement.
  • The early goals of the Civil Rights Movement and the purpose of the NAACP and other early civil rights organizations.
  • Provisions of the Sixteenth, Seventeenth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twenty-first Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify impacts of historical events.
  • Describe historical movements by comparing and contrasting.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were causes and the effects, both immediate and lasting, of various reform movements pertaining to immigration, labor, political, social, and constitutional amendments during the Progressive Era in the United States.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.6.2- Identify the problems created by industrialization and urbanization of the late 1800s including poor working conditions and unhealthy living conditions; define the concept of reform and identify at least one major reform of the Progressive Movement including child labor laws, 8-hour workdays, and cleaner living conditions in cities; identify the expansion of conservation efforts by the national parks and national forests.
SS.AAS.6.2a - Identify goals of the early civil rights movement and th


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
5 ) Evaluate the impact of social changes and the influence of key figures in the United States from World War I through the 1920s, including Prohibition, the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, the Scopes Trial, limits on immigration, Ku Klux Klan activities, the Red Scare, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Migration, the Jazz Age, Susan B. Anthony, Margaret Sanger, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, W. C. Handy, and Zelda Fitzgerald. (Alabama) [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing radio, cinema, and print media for their impact on the creation of mass culture
•  Analyzing works of major American artists and writers, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, and H. L. Mencken, to characterize the era of the 1920s
•  Determining the relationship between technological innovations and the creation of increased leisure time
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate the short- and long-term impacts of social changes and the influence of prominent figures in the United States from WWI through the 1920s.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • prohibition
  • Nineteenth Amendment
  • Scopes trial
  • Ku Klux Klan
  • Red Scare
  • Harlem Renaissance
  • mass culture
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The causes, effects, and impact of social and political events in the United States from World War I through the 1920, including Prohibition, passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, the *Scopes Trial, limits on immigration, Ku Klux Klan activities, the Red Scare, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Migration, and the Jazz Age.
  • The impact of influential individuals on social, political, and economic realities in the United States from World War I through the 1920, including Susan B. Anthony, Margaret Sanger, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, W. C. Handy, and Zelda Fitzgerald.
  • The impact of media on social and political realities in the United States from World War I through the 1920.
  • The impact of major works of American artists and writers from World War I through the 1920, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes and H.L. Mencken.
  • The importance of technological innovations through the 1920s and the impact these had on social, economic, political, and individual realities in the United States.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Explain social, economic, political, and cultural changes in the United States during specific historical periods and related to specific historical events.
  • Describe the influence of specific individuals and groups on the United States during specific historical periods into modern times.
  • Analyze the impact of technical innovations and changing media on American social and political realities.
  • Determine central ideas of primary and secondary sources.
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were significant impacts of the social changes and the influence of prominent figures in the United States from WWI through the 1920s.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.5- Identify key social changes that occurred after World War I.
SS.AAS.11.5a - Identify notable people of the 1920s including Babe Ruth, Charles Lindbergh, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Andrew Wyeth, Frederick Remington, Langston Hughes, Louis Armstrong, Henry Ford, W.C. Handy, Zora Neale Hurston, and Al Capone.


Tags: 18th Amendment, 1920s, Prohibition, Temperance Movement
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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AccessibilityText Resources: Content is organized under headings and subheadings
Comments

This lesson assumes that students have learned how to write clear topic sentences and support
them with evidence. If students have not practiced these skills in the past, you may want to provide more structure for this activity.

  This resource provided by:  
Author: Asia Hester