ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Practicing Syllables

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Practicing Syllables

URL:

https://www.jumpstart.com/common/practicing-syllables

Content Source:

Other
JumpStart
Type: Learning Activity

Overview:

Your class may be learning how to break words up into smaller parts called syllables. If a student can break long words into syllables, the words become easier to read. Use the chart provided in the learning activity for sample words. The learning activity includes some tips to help identify syllables in a word.

Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: K
9. Demonstrate early phonological awareness to basic phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.

a. Count the number of words in a spoken sentence.

b. Recognize alliterative spoken words.

c. Recognize and produce pairs of rhyming words and distinguish them from non-rhyming pairs using pictures and/or spoken words.

d. Count, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words, including compound words.

e. Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.

f. Identify the initial, final, and medial sounds of spoken words.

g. Blend and segment phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to four phonemes.

h. Distinguish between commonly confused cognate consonant sounds, using knowledge of voiced and unvoiced sounds and manner of articulation.

Examples: /t/ and /d/, /p/ and /b/, /ch/ and /j/, /s/ and /z/, /f/ and /v/, /k/ and /g/, /sh/ and /zh/, /th/ (voiced and unvoiced)

Note: Standard 9 is important as a foundational phonemic awareness skill for all learners.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 1
6. Demonstrate basic to advanced phonological and phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.

a. Count, blend, segment, and delete syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.

Examples: par-ti-cu-lar, cer-ti-fi-cate

b. Recognize and produce groups of rhyming words and distinguish them from non-rhyming groups of spoken words.

c. Produce alliterative words.

d. Blend and segment phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, including words with consonant blends.

e. Add, delete, and substitute phonemes at the beginning or end of spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, and produce the resulting word.

Examples: pan to pant; flight to light; cat to cap

f. Distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken, single-syllable words.

g. Distinguish between commonly-confused vowel sounds and commonly-confused cognate consonant sounds, using knowledge of mouth position, voiced and unvoiced sounds, and manner of articulation.

Examples: /f/ and /v/, /p/ and /b/, /t/ and /d/, /k/ and /g/, /m/ and /n/, /ng/ and /n/, /s/ and /z/, unvoiced /th/ and voiced /th/, /ch/ and /sh/, /ĕ/ and /ā/, /ĕ/ and /ă/

Note: This is extremely important as a foundational phonemic awareness skill for all learners.

h. Identify the sound substitution in words with five to six phonemes.

Example: strips/straps, square/squire
Tags: sight words, syllables
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Author: YVETTE AKRIDGE