ALEX Learning Activity

How It All Started!

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Kelli McClain
Organization:University of North Alabama
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 604
Title:
How It All Started!
Digital Tool/Resource:
Interactive Tool for The First Thanksgiving
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

This interactive tool provides videos of the pilgrims embarking on their first journey.  Students can explore the experiences and historical significance of the pilgrim's voyage, settlement, and first harvest celebration.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.2- Using maps, demonstrate an understanding that people from Europe explored and settled in Alabama.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 5
United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
4 ) Determine the economic and cultural impact of European exploration during the Age of Discovery upon European society and American Indians.

•  Identifying significant early European patrons, explorers, and their countries of origin, including early settlements in the New World
Examples: patrons—King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella

explorers—Christopher Columbus

early settlements—St. Augustine, Quebec, Jamestown

•  Tracing the development and impact of the Columbian Exchange

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.5.4- Locate North America and Europe on a world map to illustrate journey; identify primary early European explorers, including Columbus, De Soto, and Magellan; recognize that European explorers sailed to America for economic, religious, and personal gain.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 5
United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
5 ) Explain the early colonization of North America and reasons for settlement in the Northern, Middle, and Southern colonies, including geographic features, landforms, and differences in climate among the colonies.

•  Recognizing how colonial development was influenced by the desire for religious freedom
Example: development in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, and Maryland colonies

•  Identifying influential leaders in colonial society
•  Describing emerging colonial government
Examples: Mayflower Compact, representative government, town meetings, rule of law


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.5.5- Classify the American colonies into three regions, each with distinct climates and natural resources (South: farming, warm climate, Middle: farming, trading, moderate climate, New England: subsistence farming, trade, shipbuilding, cold climate); recognize characteristics of early colonial life in North America.


Learning Objectives:

Students will be able to: 

  • Explain the early colonization of North America and reasons for settlement in the Northern, Middle, and Southern colonies, including geographic features, landforms, and differences in climate among the colonies
  • Determine the economic and cultural impact of European exploration during the Age of Discovery upon European Society and American Indians
  • Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
Before/Engage
Activity:

  1. Explain to the students that the clip was taken from a movie. Historians helped produce the scene, so the reenactment is very close to what the actual days would have been like. 
  2. The students will watch the videos to explore and analyze information on the Mayflower, Pilgrims, Plymouth colony, Wampanoags, and the first Thanksgiving.  The students should take notes during the video.
  3. Divide the students in small groups to discuss and analyze information they learned from the video.
  4. After students have finished their group discussions, have them write about what they learned from the video and from their group discussions on the Mayflower, Pilgrims, Plymouth colony, Wampanoags, and the first Thanksgiving in the form a journal entry (or an essay). 

 

Assessment Strategies:

The teacher will review the students' journal entries to assess their comprehension of the first Thanksgiving.   


Advanced Preparation:

The teacher should review the video prior to the lesson.

The teacher will need access to the Internet and projector in order to display the video.

The teacher should predetermine small groups for discussion period.

 

Variation Tips (optional):

The teacher could prepare a question set to check for understanding of the first Thanksgiving.

Notes or Recommendations (optional):
 
  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: pilgrims, Thanksgiving