ALEX Learning Activity

  

Flight to Freedom: the Underground Railroad

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Cristin Dillard
System:Enterprise City
School:Enterprise City Board Of Education
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 101
Title:
Flight to Freedom: the Underground Railroad
Digital Tool/Resource:
Mission US 2: Flight to Freedom
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

Mission US 2: Flight to Freedom provides an interactive role-playing game that is available for streaming or download. The player assumes the role of a slave and journeys to freedom via the Underground Railroad. The player makes choices, has conversations with characters, and learns about life on a Southern plantation and the struggle for the  freedom of slaves.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 5
United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify and explain the causes of the Civil War, including issues of states' rights, conflicts regarding slavery, important events, regional differences, and social, economic, and political conditions.
  • Describe Alabama's role in the Civil War.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Civil War
  • Missouri Compromise
  • insurrection
  • opposition
  • rebellion
  • personalities
  • political conditions
  • confederacy
  • secession
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Causes of the Civil War, including issues of states' rights and slavery.
  • The importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860.
  • Key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler.
  • Social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War.
  • Alabama's role in the Civil War (Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Locate key places and events on a physical and political map.
  • Identify and analyze the causes of political conflict Identify key people and explain their role throughout the Civil War.
  • Describe and draw conclusions about the war affected the citizens of the United States.
  • Interpret and define the role of Alabama in the Civil War.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many factors that led to the Civil War.
  • Key people and ordinary citizens contributed to and were impacted by the Civil War.
  • Alabama responded to, participated in, and was impacted by the Civil War.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.5.11 Define civil war; recognize one or more key figures of the Civil War, including Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis; label a map of the United States with Southern and Northern states involved in the Civil War.
SS.AAS.5.11a - Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War. Example: Montgomery was the first Confederate capitol.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
12 ) Describe the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin and the role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimké, Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing the rise of religious movements in opposition to slavery, including objections of the Quakers
•  Explaining the importance of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 that banned slavery in new states north of the Ohio River
•  Describing the rise of the Underground Railroad and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman and the impact of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, on the abolitionist movement
Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate the impact of the abolitionist movement on the United States from the earliest groups, leaders, and legislation until right before the Civil War.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • impact
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Details of the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin.
  • The role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimke', Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner.
  • The role of religious movements in opposition to slavery, including objections of the Quakers.
  • The impact of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 that banned slavery in new states north of the Ohio River.
  • How the Underground Railroad developed, its impact on American society in the North and in the South, and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman.
  • The impact of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin on the abolitionist movement.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin to the development of later abolitionist societies.
  • Describe the rise of religious of movements in opposition to slavery.
  • Explain the importance of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.
  • Describe the rise of the Underground Railroad and it's leaders.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There was an important abolitionist movement in the United States from the earliest leaders and groups through the later groups, leaders, and legislation.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.12- Define abolition; understand the purpose of the abolitionist movement; identify important leaders and contributions of the abolitionist movement.


Learning Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • Describe the rise of the Underground Railroad and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman and the impact on the abolitionist movement.
  • Identify causes of the Civil War including states' rights and the issue of slavery
  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
During/Explore/Explain
Activity:

  1. Students will need to log into the Mission US 2 game, "Flight to Freedom".
  2. The student(s) will create their own path to freedom by assuming the role of a slave on a Southern plantation during the antebellum period of history. 
  3. During their journey, students will be given different options to choose to continue their journey.  Based on their choice, their journey will change and they will have to face the consequences.
Assessment Strategies:

At the completion of the game, students will write about their experiences as a slave in their journal.


Advanced Preparation:
Technical Preparation:

  • Teacher will need to register for a "free" account and create user names and passwords for each student in order to play "Flight to Freedom."
  • Teacher will need to either stream or download "Flight to Freedom" ahead of time on the computer(s) being used by the students.
  • Students will need headphones if the learning asset is used as an independent activity.
  • Teacher will need projector, interactive white board (optional), and speakers if the activity will be completed as whole group instruction.

Background Knowledge:

  • Students will have been introduced to the abolition movement and the network of the Underground Railroad.
Variation Tips (optional):

The interactive "Flight to Freedom" may be projected for a whole-group playing experience or as independent activities for students.

Notes or Recommendations (optional):
 
  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: Harriet Tubman, slavery, Underground Railroad