ALEX Learning Activity

  

I Have a Dream, Martin Luther King Jr.

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Geri Evans
System:Hoover City
School:Bluff Park Elementary School
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 114
Title:
I Have a Dream, Martin Luther King Jr.
Digital Tool/Resource:
Blabberize--Create a video of your own
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

Blabberize will allow students to take their own voice and add it to a picture that talks.

In this lesson, students will create their own "I Have a Dream" speeches and put them with a picture of how they may see themselves in the future (example: a picture of a pilot, nurse, teacher....) The picture will talk with the words of the student's own speech.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the social, political, and economic impact of the modern Civil Rights Movement on Alabama.
  • Describe the impact of important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • Summarize the significance of key events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March.
  • Interpret the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954.
  • Will identify the purpose and goals of education in American society and explain why African Americans chose to challenge segregated education in their quest for equality.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • analyze
  • interpret
  • discrimination
  • prejudice
  • protest (violent and non-violent)
  • boycott
  • sit-in
  • segregation
  • integration
  • Jim Crow
  • suffrage
  • rights
  • NAACP
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Many of the key leaders that were vital to the modern Civil Rights movement including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • How the Montgomery Bus Boycott and other forms of protest impacted Alabama's economy.
  • How the many forms of non-violent protests were used to help African Americans in Alabama gain equality including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Selma-to-Montgomery March, and children's marches.
  • African Americans in Alabama were often the victims of violence while trying to gain equality (Sixteenth Street Church bombing, Freedom Riders bus bombing).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Recognize important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • Describe events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March.
  • Interpret primary sources such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954, and Letters from the Birmingham Jail.
  • Use vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Many individuals and events had a social, political, and economic impact on the people of Alabama during the modern Civil Rights Movement. There were many benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown v. Board (1954).
  • The doctrine of separate but equal called for specific things.
  • These events also had a significant impact on the nation.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.14- Identify the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement; recognize important issues, leaders, and results of the movement.
SS.AAS.4.14a -Identify vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights.


Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 4
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identfy ways to be safe using digital devices.
  • demonstate how to be safe when using digital devices.
  • apply strategies to be safe when using digital devices.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • personal safety
  • digital device
  • digital citizenship
  • personal information
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • strategies to be safe while using digital devices.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create and use passwords which are only shared with their parents or teacher.
  • log off of digital device when no longer using it.
  • explain why you should not share personal information with others online.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • passwords are important to have and not share
  • logging out of resources and devices protect your accounts and information.
  • you should never share personal information with others online.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 4
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • produce authentic artifacts using digital tools.
  • review and revise authentic artifacts using digital tools.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • multimedia
  • artifacts
  • Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use a variety of digital tools in which they can create or revise authentic artifacts to share their knowledge.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design and create authentic artifacts using approved digital tools that meet COPPA guidelines.
  • review an authentic artifact to revise with new or additional information.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • everyone can be an author, producer, director, etc.
  • using digital tools.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 4
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use basic features of digital tools to communciate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • digital tools
  • communicate
  • key ideas
  • informs
  • persuades
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • digital tools are available that enable them to inform others.
  • digital tools are available that enable them to persuade others.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use basic features such as headings, text, and images to communicate key ideas that inform and/or persuade.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • digital tools can be used to communicate by informing and/or persuade others.
Learning Objectives:

Understand the key events and people in the Civil Rights movement

Read, interpret, and organize information using a variety of sources and tools.

Apply productivity/multimedia tools and peripherals to support personal productivity,  communication, and learning throughout the curriculum.

  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
During/Explore/Explain
Activity:

Students listen to the book "I Have a Dream" by Margaret Davidson read aloud.  

The teacher will discuss how Dr. King had a dream and how that dream became a reality with his hard work, nonviolent message and the marches that he helped to organize. The teacher will discuss how everyone should have dreams. Students write their own "I Have a Dream" speech thinking about their future.

After Reading the Book, "I Have a Dream" By Maragaret Davidson, students should watch the video of MLK giving the speech in Washington (http://www.teachertube.com/video/i-have-a-dream-speech-20916).

Have students write their own "I Have a Dream Speech" for themselves and use a picture of what they may look like in the future (pilot, doctor, nurse, fireman, etc) to speak for them using Blabberize.

 

Their speech should be a minimum of two paragraphs and should include the vision they have for themselves as well as their family and future. Introduce Blabberize and show students some examples from the site. Students search for pictures of what they may look like in the future to download to Blabberize and then record their speeches on the site to share with the class. 

Assessment Strategies:

Students will turn in their writing (a minimum of two paragraphs). Students will share their speech with the class through their Blabberized photo.

Students will demonstrate understanding of the Civil Right Movement and the impact Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had based on class discussions; while reading the book and after watching the "I Have a Dream" speech by Martin Luther King Jr.


Advanced Preparation:

Teacher should ensure all technology required is available for class use.

Teacher should be familiar with Blabberize.

Variation Tips (optional):

If you want a shorter book, there are several short picture books about Martin Luther King that you could read including: Martin's Big Words, Our Friend, Martin, or My Brother, Martin.

Notes or Recommendations (optional):

If students have not ever downloaded a picture, demonstrate this in front of the whole class and have students that get their pictures downloaded first help others as well. 

  Keywords and Search Tags  
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