ALEX Learning Activity

  

Hammurabi's Code for Kids

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Courtney Monnette
System:Sylacauga City
School:Indian Valley Elementary School
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 1520
Title:
Hammurabi's Code for Kids
Digital Tool/Resource:
Hammurabi's Code Explained: World History Review Video
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

Great video that describes Hammurabi's Code and discusses why it was important.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 8
World History to 1500
1 ) Explain how artifacts and other archaeological findings provide evidence of the nature and movement of prehistoric groups of people.

Examples: cave paintings, Ice Man, Lucy, fossils, pottery

•  Identifying the founding of Rome as the basis of the calendar established by Julius Caesar and used in early Western civilization for over a thousand years
•  Identifying the birth of Christ as the basis of the Gregorian calendar used in the United States since its beginning and in most countries of the world today, signified by B.C. and A.D.
•  Using vocabulary terms other than B.C. and A.D. to describe time
Examples: B.C.E., C.E.

•  Identifying terms used to describe characteristics of early societies and family structures
Examples: monogamous, polygamous, nomadic

Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography, History
Course Title: World History to 1500
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain how artifacts and other archaeological findings provide evidence of the nature, social and family structures, and movements of prehistoric groups of people including prehistoric fossils, human remains such as mummies, human artwork, pottery and other human-made artifacts.
  • Describe the relationship among various methods for describing historical and pre-historical time, including: the Julian calendar, the Gregorian calendar and associated use of B.C. and A.D., use of B.C.E. and C.E.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • artifacts
  • archaeological findings
  • evidence
  • Gregorian calendar
  • Julian calendar
  • nomadic
  • agrarian
  • monogamous
  • polygamous
  • prehistoric
  • B.C.E.
  • C.E.
  • B.C.
  • A.D.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How artifacts and other archaeological findings provide evidence of the nature of movement of prehistoric people.
  • The historical basis for the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Various ways to describe historic and pre-historic time, including use of B.C.E. and C.E.
  • Terms to describe characteristics of early societies and family structures (Ex. monogamous, polygamous, nomadic, agrarian).
Skills:
The students are able to:
  • Describe the difference between artifacts and fossils and how they are used by archeologists and historians.
  • Use examples to explain the ways artifacts and other archaeological findings provide evidence of the nature and movement of prehistoric groups of people.
  • Describe time through the use of a variety to calendars and methods.
  • Identify terms used to describe characteristics of early societies and family structures.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Archaeologists and historians use evidence left behind by prehistoric people to describe the nature of these people and their movements.
  • The Gregorian and Julian calendars differ and various calendars use different dates as their starting points.
  • There are a variety of ways to identify historical time.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.8.1- Recognize that cave paintings, fossils, and pottery remnants provide evidence of early groups of people; draw logical conclusions about sample artifacts.
SS.AAS.8.1a - Identifying terms B.C. and A.D. used to describe to describe time.


Learning Objectives:

The students will be able to describe characteristics of early societies and family structures such as the Hammurabi's Code and what it meant to the Mesopotamian civilization.

  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
Before/Engage
Activity:

The students will watch the video and then participate in the after discussion with focus on the following:

  • What was the code?
  • What was the importance?
  • What were the implications of the code?
  • What were the consequences of violations?

Students will complete a Quick write- Which part of the code do you think was the most important?  Which do you think had the major impact on our society?

Assessment Strategies:

Quick write - Which part of the code do you think was the most important?  Which do you think had the major impact on our society?


Advanced Preparation:

Speakers, Internet, screen, projector

Variation Tips (optional):

With an advanced class - break the class into groups to look at the sections of code.  What codes applied to life, business, religion, farming, and society.

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/ancient/hamframe.asp 

Notes or Recommendations (optional):
 
  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: Hammurabis Code for Kids, Mesopotamia