ALEX Learning Activity

  

Not Enough Hours in the Day? Daylight Data Collection

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Mollie Bounds
System:Madison City
School:Madison City Board Of Education
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 1850
Title:
Not Enough Hours in the Day? Daylight Data Collection
Digital Tool/Resource:
timeanddate.com
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

Students and teacher collaboratively collect and organize data on the length of days throughout the year and analyze patterns that they see. Students and teacher will create a digital spreadsheet and a connected chart in order to reflect and make observations while analyzing the data represented in chart format.

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS COS Resource Development Summit.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2015 (2016)
Grade: 1
18 ) Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another. [1-MD4]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.18- Sort objects or pictures into common categories (e.g., shapes, pets, fruits; limited to two categories and a combined total of 15 objects/pictures for the categories).


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: Earth's Place in the Universe
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Make observations, firsthand or from media, to collect data and use it to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of the year.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • observe
  • seasonal
  • patterns
  • sunrise
  • sunset
  • describes
  • relationship
  • hours
  • daylight
  • year
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • There is a relationship between the relative length of the day and the season of the year.
Skills:
Students are able to:
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset can be observed, described and predicted.
    AMSTI Resources:
    AMSTI Module:
    Sound and Light, Foss
    Sundial, GLOBE
    Sky, Delta

    NAEP Framework
    NAEP Statement::
    E4.1: Objects in the sky have patterns of movement. The Sun, for example, appears to move across the sky in the same way every day, but its path changes slowly over the seasons. The Moon appears to move across the sky on a daily basis much like the Sun.

    NAEP Statement::
    E4.2: The observable shape of the Moon changes from day to day in a cycle that lasts about a month.

    NAEP Statement::
    E4.8: Weather changes from day to day and during the seasons.

    NAEP Statement::
    E4.9: Scientists use tools for observing, recording, and predicting weather changes from day to day and during the seasons.



    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    SCI.AAS.1.9- Identify the four seasons of the year in Alabama using common representations.


    Digital Literacy and Computer Science
    DLIT (2018)
    Grade: 1
    R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

    Insight Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • will find and collect information about a topic using a computing device.
    • will use key words about a topic in a search engine to find information about that topic.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • video
    • text
    • image
    • webpage
    • ebook
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • search engines help to locate information.
    • computers give access to many different forms of information.
    • devices can record pictures, drawings, videos, and text.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • choose and type or say key words and phrases into a search engine which results in specific information pertaining to a topic when given support and guidance from an adult.
    • find information about a specific topic or to answer a specific question using a digital resource such as a webpage, ebook, and/or video when given support and guidance from an adult.
    • record their learning into a digital device using video, text, and/or pictures/drawings when given support and guidance from an adult.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • a search engine will find specific resources and information using key words.
    • answers to questions can be found in many different digital resources such as a webpages, ebooks, and/or video.
    • they can show what they have learned using a digital resource such as video, text, and or pictures/drawings.
    Digital Literacy and Computer Science
    DLIT (2018)
    Grade: 1
    1) Classify and sort information into logical order with and without a computer.

    Examples: Sort by shape, color, or other attribute; sort A-Z.

    Insight Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • will identify various attributes/characteristics of items.
    • will sort items based on an identified attribute/ characteristic.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • attribute
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to identify attributes of items.
    • that attributes are used for sorting.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • identify various attributes of items.
    • sort items based on an identified attribute.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • items can have attributes of varying types.
    • attributes can be used to group items.
    • attributes can be used to sort items and put into a specific order.
    Digital Literacy and Computer Science
    DLIT (2018)
    Grade: 1
    14) Discuss the purpose of collecting and organizing data.

    Insight Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • will determine when collecting and organizing data will serve the best purpose.
    • will determine the best method for organizing data collected.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • data
    • collection
    • information
    • graph
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • data can be collected to give information.
    • data can be organized in various ways.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • determine appropriate situations to collect data.
    • determine a way to organize data they collect.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • data collection gives information.
    • the method chosen for organizing data is important.
    Digital Literacy and Computer Science
    DLIT (2018)
    Grade: 1
    15) Interpret data displayed in a chart.

    Example: Using charts which depict data students interpret the data either verbally or in written form (which has more, less, are equal).

    Insight Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • will observe data organized in a chart or graph and answer basic questions based on that data.
    • will observe organized data and interpret that data both verbally and in written form.
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to look at simple graphs and interpret them collaboratively and indepently.
    • information can be depicted in various ways such as numbers, pictures, blocks.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • answer questions based on information shown in a graph or chart.
    • determine certain results based on information in a graph or chart.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • we gain information by collecting data and depicting that data in a chart or graph.
    • we can look at charts and graphs and discover information.
    Learning Objectives:

    Students will locate and curate information about daylight hours.

    Students will discuss the purpose of collecting and organizing data about daylight hours.

    Students will interpret organize and interpret data displayed in a chart about daylight hours.

    Students will draw the connection between the time of daylight to the season.

    Students will infer the reason behind the change in seasons.

      Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
    Phase:
    Before/Engage
    Activity:

    This activity is a great "Before" activity to make light of the relationship between sunlight and seasons.

    Students use https://www.timeanddate.com/ to fill out the graphic organizer on the length of daylight hours. Students fill out their reflections and connections on the same sheet.

    The class then collaboratively, along with the teacher, puts the information into a spreadsheet. Students and teachers decide what to name the columns and how to enter the information accurately. 

    Once the data has been entered the teacher leads a conversation about any trends or things that students notice about the length of the day and their relationship with seasons.

    Next, the teacher leads the class in using a spreadsheet software such as Excel, Google Sheets, or Numbers to turn the collected data into a chart. Together, the class makes all the decisions as to which chart shows the data the best, labeling x and y-axis, and choosing a title for the chart.

    Because there may be multiple charts that can represent the data accurately, show students what the data looks like in different chart formats such as a bar graph or a line graph. To further show the connection between the data and the chart, alter some of the information so that students can see how this affects the data visually in the chart.

    *Depending on how technologically savvy your class is, some students may be capable of creating the chart themselves.

    Assessment Strategies:

    The graphic organizer, Daylight Hours

    Teacher observation during the building of the datasheet.

    Teacher observation during the building of the chart.

    Teacher observation during reflections and questions.


    Advanced Preparation:

    In the website, https://www.timeanddate.com/, select Sun Calculator under the drop down menu titled, "Sun&Moon." Then, enter your location information in order to reach the page in which your daylight data is displayed. Daylight hours are listed under the graph as you drag the line to the month and day you wish to see the hours on.

    Print the graphic organizer "Daylight Hours" for each of your students.

    Have access to a computer lab and/or computers for your students.

     

    DAYLIGHT HOURS

    Research the information at https://www.timeanddate.com/ and fill in the chart below.

     

     Year: _____________________

    Month

    Duration of Daylight

    Observations

    If the duration of time is 10 hours and 15 minutes, write it like this: 10:15.



    1

    December

                                    

    January

      

    February

      


    2

    March

      

    April

      

    May

      


    3

    June

      

    July

      

    August

      


    4

    September

      

    October

      

    November

      

     

    What do you notice about the length of days?

    Does the length of day affect the season? How?

    Variation Tips (optional):
     
    Notes or Recommendations (optional):

    Depending on the ability level of your students, you may want a more advanced group to create a sheet of their own while others are interpreting given sheets.

      Keywords and Search Tags  
    Keywords and Search Tags: