ALEX Learning Activity

  

Digital Footprints: "Who Are You?" vs. "Where Are You?"

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Mollie Bounds
System:Madison City
School:Madison City Board Of Education
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 1852
Title:
Digital Footprints: "Who Are You?" vs. "Where Are You?"
Digital Tool/Resource:
Follow the Digital Trail Video
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

Through class conversation and research, students determine the difference between private and personal information and what is okay to share in a digital environment. Students will also discuss the two ways to leave a digital footprint: one that tells others who you are and one that tells others where you are.

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS COS Resource Development Summit.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
31 ) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about Grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. [SL.1.1]

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.1.1a]

b. Build on others' talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges. [SL.1.1b]

c. Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion. [SL.1.1c]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
32 ) Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. [SL.1.2]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.1.32- Ask and/or answer questions about a text read aloud.


Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 1
R2) Recognize and demonstrate age-appropriate responsible use of digital devices and resources as outlined in school/district rules.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • will understand when work belongs to someone else and when to give them credit when using it.
  • will understand that when I use someone's work I may need to ask permission.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • credit
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • to respect the work of others.
  • to give credit to others when using their work.
  • to obtain permission when possible to use the work of others.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • understand pieces of work belongs to someone else.
  • understand that it is necessary to give credit to others when using their work.
  • understand they should obtain permission when possible to use the work of others.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • work produced by someone belongs to that person.
  • if they want to use someone's work they must give that person credit.
  • sometimes it is necessary to ask permission to use someone's work.
  • Digital Literacy and Computer Science
    DLIT (2018)
    Grade: 1
    4) Demonstrate age-appropriate methods for keeping personal information private.

    Example: Keep passwords confidential, use anonymous profile picture or avatar, develop user names that are non-identifying or do not include actual name.

    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • will keep passwords private.
    • choose icons, avatars, and usernames that don't identify personal information.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • password
    • public
    • private
    • username
    • icon
    • avatar
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • that passwords protect their private information.
    • passwords should be kept private.
    • photographs and usernames can be used as identifying information.
    • photogrpahs and usernames shared online should not identify them.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • keep their passwords private.
    • choose icons and avatars instead of a photograph of them.
    • create usernames that don't identify them to the public.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • they have personal information that identifies them and it should not be shared.
    • safety rules are important to follow when using a computer.
    Digital Literacy and Computer Science
    DLIT (2018)
    Grade: 1
    6) Identify appropriate and inappropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

    Examples: Cyberbullying, online etiquette.

    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • will take turns in a digital environment.
    • will speak, write, and behave kindly in a digital environment.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • cyberbullying
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • that speaking, writing, or behaving unkindly in a digital environment is bullying.
    • taking turns is polite.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • take turns.
    • speak, write, and behave respectfully toward others and their work in a digital environment.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • kind and respectful behavior in a digital environment is very much like that out of the digital environment.
    Digital Literacy and Computer Science
    DLIT (2018)
    Grade: 1
    7) Recognize that a person has a digital identity.

    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • will recognize that the way people behave online or in a digital environment is permanent.
    • will recognize that the way people behave online or in a digital environment is part of their identity.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • identity
    • digital
    • permanent
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • what they say and do on the internet or a collaborative digital environment is permanent.
    • what they say and do on the internet or a collaborative digital environment is part of their identity.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • tell that the way in which they behave, work, and play in a collaborative environment such as an online game and/or learning environment is a part of their identity.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • their behavior, words, and actions in an online collaborative environment is a part of their identity.
    Learning Objectives:

    Students will describe a digital footprint.

    Students will voice the difference between private and personal information. 

    Students will voice what type of information locates them.

    Students will keep identifying information private. 

    Students will identify respectful behaviors on and offline.

    Students will ask and answer questions to gain more knowledge on a topic or to clarify something that isn't understood.

    Students will participate in a group conversation by listening, taking turns, asking questions, and offering suggestions about the topic.

      Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
    Phase:
    Before/Engage
    Activity:

    Watch this video together. Stop and ask/answer questions when appropriate if students need to ask clarification questions.

    1. Discussion questions to consider:
      1. What is a digital footprint?
      2. If a fingerprint/footprint can identify who I am, what can identify me in a digital world?
      3. Why is it important not to give away information about where you are?
      4. Why is it important to behave kindly and respectfully in a digital environment?
      5. Can my digital footprint wash away or be erased?
      6. Do I have a responsibility with OTHER people's private and personal information?

    Title a chart called "My Information". Create a T-chart underneath with the titles: private vs. personal.

    Open a discussion to the class about private vs. personal information. Anything under private should NEVER be shared in a digital environment. Use predetermined protocols for class discussions, such as Socratic seminar, to structure the conversation. 

    Once the chart is complete reflect on HOW we can keep that information private when we are online playing games, working with others, etc.

    Have students reflect in a journal or in another way about how to keep themselves safe from others in the digital world. 

    Assessment Strategies:

    Teacher observation through discussions and conversations.

    Student's T-chart responses. Example answers here.

    Student reflection piece.


    Advanced Preparation:

    The teacher will need chart paper or an interactive whiteboard to create T-chart.

    Variation Tips (optional):
     
    Notes or Recommendations (optional):
     
      Keywords and Search Tags  
    Keywords and Search Tags: