ALEX Learning Activity

  

Portraying Emotional Messages Through Visual Art

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Stephanie Carver
System:Cullman City
School:Cullman City Board Of Education
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 2059
Title:
Portraying Emotional Messages Through Visual Art
Digital Tool/Resource:
Forms of Art - Symbolism ReadWorks Article
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

Students will read an article on Edvard Munch’s painting The Scream.The class will discuss the message Edvard Munch was trying to convey. The students will then be given an emotion to portray in a painting or sketch. The class will discuss which emotion each work of art conveys.

This activity was created as a result of the Arts COS Resource Development Summit.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
10 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RI.4.1]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Cognitive Target::
  • Identify textually explicit information and make simple inference with and across texts, such as: definitions, facts, supporting details.
  • Make complex inferences within and across texts to describe problems and solution or cause and effect, determine unstated assumptions in and argument. Draw conclusions and provide supporting details.
  • Determine fact from opinion.
  • Identify textually explicit information within and across text, such as locating specific information in text or graphics. Make complex references within and across texts, such as draw conclusions and provide supporting information.

NAEP Descriptor::
Use examples from article to explain interpretation. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize main questions answered by an article. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Interpret text details to select and provide one example. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize explicitly stated information from an article. (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize explicitly stated information in an informational text. (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize cause explicitly stated in an informational text. (Locate and Recall)



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.10- Answer who, what, when, and where questions to demonstrate understanding of an informational text.


Arts Education
ARTS (2017)
Grade: 4
Visual Arts
11) Analyze components in visual imagery that convey meanings and messages.

Example: What is the meaning of Edvard Munch's The Scream?

Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and analyze artistic work.
Process Components: Perceive, Analyze, Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: Visual imagery influences understanding of and responses to the world.
EQ: What is an image? Where and how do we encounter images in our world? How do images influence our views of the world?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Compare Gyotaku Japanese fish printing and printing with a rubber stamp.
  • Make conclusions about the artist's feelings and perspective.
  • Analyze the meaning of Edvard Munch's The Scream.
  • Interpret Emanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware River and its relevance to the Revolutionary War.
  • Discuss and form an opinion about the social and personal value of a piece of art.
  • Apply one element or principle of design to discuss how students' outcomes are different even though they used the same criteria for a work of art/ design.
  • Formulate criteria for discussing and assessing works of art.
  • Use art vocabulary when discussing and judging artworks.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others for the purpose of personal reflection and on-going improvement.
Arts Education
ARTS (2017)
Grade: 4
Visual Arts
13) Apply one criterion from elements or principles of design to evaluate more than one work of art/design.

Example: Discuss how students' outcomes are different even though they used the same criteria.

Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 9: Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work.
Process Components: Perceive, Analyze, Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: People evaluate art based on various criteria.
EQ: How does one determine criteria to evaluate a work of art? How and why might criteria vary? How is a personal preference different from an evaluation?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Compare Gyotaku Japanese fish printing and printing with a rubber stamp.
  • Make conclusions about the artist's feelings and perspective.
  • Analyze the meaning of Edvard Munch's The Scream.
  • Interpret Emanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware River and its relevance to the Revolutionary War.
  • Discuss and form an opinion about the social and personal value of a piece of art.
  • Apply one element or principle of design to discuss how students' outcomes are different even though they used the same criteria for a work of art/ design.
  • Formulate criteria for discussing and assessing works of art.
  • Use art vocabulary when discussing and judging artworks.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others for the purpose of personal reflection and on-going improvement.
Learning Objectives:

I can analyze components in visual imagery that convey a message.

I can evaluate more than more work of art.

I can refer to details in the text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 

  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
During/Explore/Explain
Activity:

The students will read the article "Forms of Art: Symbolism" on ReadWorks.org. This article has questions at the end that can be used to guide a class discussion. The teacher will need to guide the class discussion to analyze components in Edvard Munch’s painting The Scream that convey a message. 

After reading and discussing the article, the teacher will assign an emotion to each student to portray in a painting or sketch. The students must use the emotion to send a message to the audience. Examples of possible emotions are anger, fear, excitement, happiness, sadness, frustration, disgust, etc. You might want to place parameters on the paintings or sketches, such as it must be a self-portrait. 

The students will end the learning activity by trying to identify the emotional message the student artists were trying to convey. You can allow the students to go on a gallery walk or just discuss each painting or sketch as a whole group.

Assessment Strategies:

Students will analyze components in visual imagery that convey a message and refer to details in the text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text through class discussions. The given discussion questions at the end of the ReadWorks article can be used.

Students will evaluate more than one work of art to identify the emotional message the student artist is trying to convey. 


Advanced Preparation:

The teacher and students will need ReadWorks.org accounts. ReadWorks is a free online resource that includes a variety of reading passages. Students can simply use their Google account to create a ReadWorks account. The teacher will need to create student accounts if the students do not have Google accounts. Once the teacher has created his or her account, simply create a class and give the class code to the students to join. The teacher can search for the article "Forms of Art: Symbolism" and assign it to the class.

The students will need a device with Internet access to view the article. If students do not have access to a device with Internet, then the teacher can use a classroom projector to display the article or print and copy the article for the students.

Variation Tips (optional):
 
Notes or Recommendations (optional):
 
  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: