ALEX Learning Activity

  

Drugs and the Teen Brain (HyperDoc - Website Creation)

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

You may save this Learning Activity to your hard drive as an .html file by selecting “File”,then “Save As” from your browser’s pull down menu. The file name extension must be .html.
  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Amy Lack
System:Jackson County
School:Jackson County Board Of Education
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 2219
Title:
Drugs and the Teen Brain (HyperDoc - Website Creation)
Digital Tool/Resource:
Head's Up Drugs and the Teen Brain Lesson Plan
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

The students will synthesize information to learn how their brain develops and why using drugs and alcohol is especially risky for teens. Students will use this information to design, create, and publish a Google Site that explains why teens are more at risk for becoming addicted to drugs than adults.

This activity was created as a result of the ALEX Resource Development Summit.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
Health
HE1 (2009)
Grade: 7
7 ) Demonstrate decision-making skills as they relate to situations involving health risks.

Examples: responding appropriately to sexual harassment, avoiding physical conflict, objecting to verbal and physical bullying, avoiding inappropriate electronic communication

Health
HE1 (2009)
Grade: 8
13 ) Explain why mixing drugs can cause injury, illness, and death.

Health
HE1 (2009)
Grade: 9-12
15 ) Identify effects on health and behavior regarding the use of chemical substances, including prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 7
10 ) Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.7.1]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.7.10- Answer who, what, when, where, and why questions of informational text, using textual evidence as support.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 7
25 ) Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources. [W.7.6]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 8
10 ) Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.8.1]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Cognitive Target::
  • Identify textually explicit information and make simple inference with and across texts, such as: definitions, facts, supporting details.
  • Make complex inferences within and across texts to describe problems and solution or cause and effect, determine unstated assumptions in and argument. Draw conclusions and provide supporting details.
  • Determine fact from opinion.
  • Identify textually explicit information within and across text, such as locating specific information in text or graphics. Make complex references within and across texts, such as draw conclusions and provide supporting information.

NAEP Descriptor::
Using understanding of an article to explain the title. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Use examples from article to explain interpretation. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize the main question answered by article. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Explain differences using information from the article. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize implicit message of a paragraph in a persuasive essay. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize the reason for an action based on explicit details in an expository text. (Locate and Recall)



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.8.10- Answer who, what, when, where, and why questions to analyze informational text, using textual evidence and inferences as support.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 9
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.9-10.1]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.9.10- Answer who, what, when, where, and why questions to analyze informational text, using textual evidence and inferences as support.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 10
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.9-10.1]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.10.10- Answer who, what, when, where, and why questions to analyze informational text, using textual evidence and inferences as support.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 11
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.11.10- Answer who, what, when, where, and why questions to analyze informational text, using textual evidence and inferences as support.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 12
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Cognitive Target::
  • Identify textually explicit information and make simple inference with and across texts, such as: definitions, facts, supporting details.
  • Make complex inferences within and across texts to describe problems and solution or cause and effect, determine unstated assumptions in and argument. Draw conclusions and provide supporting details.
  • Determine fact from opinion.
  • Identify textually explicit information within and across text, such as locating specific information in text or graphics. Make complex references within and across texts, such as draw conclusions and provide supporting information.

NAEP Descriptor::
Provide and explain information from an article. (Critique and Evaluate)

NAEP Descriptor::
Make an inference based on details in a document.

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize explicitly state reason from argument of article.



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.12.10- Answer who, what, when, where, and why questions to analyze informational text, using textual evidence and inferences as support.


Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
16) Construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Examples: Design a multi-media children's e-book with an appropriate readability level.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to select and design an appropriate medium to display designed content.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • select the best medium for the content design.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • while many mediums exist, it is best to select the one most appropriate to your intended audience.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
17) Publish content to be available for external feedback.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • publish content to be available for external feedback.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that feedback is important to refine a product.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • appropriately publish content.
  • seek feedback on a product.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • feedback can be used to refine a product.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
17) Communicate and publish individually or collaboratively to persuade peers, experts, or community about issues and problems.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • select an issue or problem and publish content designed to persuade peers, experts, or the community.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to research and form an educated position about an issue.
  • how to communicate and publish opinion in an effort to persuade others.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • research and form an educated position about an issue.
  • communicate and publish an educated opinion in an effort to persuade others.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a digital platform provides the ability to publish ideas and reach a greater audience than was once possible.
Learning Objectives:

Students will create a Google Site that cites textual evidence to explain why teens are more at risk for becoming addicted to drugs than adults.

  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
During/Explore/Explain
Activity:

  1. This lesson students will use a HyperDoc that will take them through all the steps of this activity. A hyperdoc is an innovative way to put an entire digital lesson into your students’ hands that allows students to collaborate, think critically, combine information from multiple sources, and create through technology. See this video for more information: Introduction to Hyperdocs Video

  2. The teacher will show Anyone Can Become Addicted to Drugs Video to engage the students in the lesson.
  3. The teacher will activate students’ prior knowledge briefly review and discuss the article “Drugs and the Teen Brain” by having students think-pair-share about what they learned from the article and activities.
  4. The students will choose to explore at least four of the topics on the Scholastic Heads Up Webpage about the decision making and health risks of drugs and how drugs can cause injury, illness, and death that are of interest to them: Heads Up: Drugs and the Teen Brain 
  5. The teacher will explain to students: “Teens are at a critical time of development. The brain doesn’t become fully developed until the mid-20s. This fact makes teens especially susceptible to the harmful effects of drugs and alcohol, putting them at a greater risk for addiction as well as damage to the brain. Through this activity, you will explain how the brain develops and why using drugs and alcohol is especially risky for teens.”
  6. The students will construct and publish a Google Site for a teenage audience citing evidence from the article “Drugs and the Teen Brain” as well as the resources they explored from Scholastic Heads Up: Drug and the Teen Brain website that explains why teens are more at risk for becoming addicted to drugs than adults. The site should include the following criteria:

    • A title page that explains the purpose of the website.
    • At least three more pages.
    • It must include cited text information from the article and/or Heads Up: Drugs and the Teen Brain website on how your brain changes as you grow and how these changes affect your behavior and abilities.
    • It must explain the purpose of the prefrontal cortex and the limbic system in the brain and give examples of types of behavior or activities that are controlled by each of these areas through cited text evidence.
    • It must explain why teens are more at risk for becoming addicted to drugs than adults through cited text evidence.
    • A sources page with a list of all of the sources students have cited.

7. The students will peer edit using a rubric and provide feedback for improving each others’ websites.

8. The students will answer the following reflection questions:  What were some of the most interesting discoveries you made while working on this project? About drugs and teens? About yourself? About others?

Assessment Strategies:

The construction and publication of Drugs and the Teen Brain Hyperdoc activity can be used to assess mastery of the students’ ability to cite strong text evidence that supports the analysis of and inferences drawn from a text about why teens are more at risk for becoming addicted to drugs than adults.

Peer assessment using a rubric

Teacher assessment using a rubric


Advanced Preparation:

Students will need access to the Internet and their own device.

Teachers and students need to review how to make a Google Site; Google Site tutorial video

Variation Tips (optional):

Change the number of pages required on the Google Site for students who need accommodations.

Allow students to work with a partner.

This lesson could be adapted for 6th -12th students.

Extend the lesson by having students explore the following resources.

This lesson could be used with other websites or student blogs besides Google sites.

This lesson could be used to teach students how to create a Google Site/Website/Blog.

This lesson could be used to extend  Scholastic’s Head’s Up Drugs and the Teen Brain Lesson Plan.

Notes or Recommendations (optional):
 
  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: Alcohol, cite textual evidence, Drugs, Hyperdoc, nonfiction, publish, real world, technology, Teen Brain, Teenager, Teens, website creation