ALEX Learning Activity

  

Dr. Martin Luther King Junior Identify Conflicts Between Cultural Differences

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

You may save this Learning Activity to your hard drive as an .html file by selecting “File”,then “Save As” from your browser’s pull down menu. The file name extension must be .html.
  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Shandra Upchurch
System:Madison County
School:Riverton Elementary School
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 2323
Title:
Dr. Martin Luther King Junior Identify Conflicts Between Cultural Differences
Digital Tool/Resource:
National Geographic Kids--Martin Luther King, Jr.
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

This learning activity should be used to introduce the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  The students will explore the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by reading and viewing pictures on the website https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/explore/history/martin-luther-king-jr/. The students will use a T-Chart to compare and contrast cultural differences during The Civil Rights movement.

 

This activity was created as a result of the ALEX Resource Development Summit.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 3
Geographic and Historical Studies: People, Places, and Regions
6 ) Identify conflicts within and between geographic areas involving use of land, economic competition for scarce resources, opposing political views, boundary disputes, and cultural differences.

•  Identifying examples of cooperation among governmental agencies within and between different geographic areas
Examples: American Red Cross, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), World Health Organization (WHO)

•  Locating areas of political conflict on maps and globes
•  Explaining the role of the United Nations (UN) and the United States in resolving conflict within and between geographic areas
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Geographical and Historical Studies: People, Places, and Regions
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify economic, geographic, historical and political conflicts and their causes which occur within and between countries and regions.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • geographic area
  • governmental agencies
  • United Nations
  • conflict
  • political
  • economic
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How to use a map to locate geographic regions.
  • The role of governmental agencies.
  • The role of the United Nations (UN) and the United States in resolving conflicts.
  • Vocabulary: geographic area, governmental agencies including American Red Cross, World Health Organization (WHO) and Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and United Nation
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Analyze how cooperation and conflict among people contribute to political, economic and cultural conflicts.
  • Locate places on physical and political maps.
  • Identify and summarize information related to cooperation of governmental agencies.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Conflicts occur within and between geographic areas over land, economic competition for scarce resources, opposing political views, boundary disputes, and cultural differences.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.3.6- Identify reasons for conflicts between people, and within and between organizations, and geographic areas; identify ways to resolve conflicts and encourage cooperation.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the social, political, and economic impact of the modern Civil Rights Movement on Alabama.
  • Describe the impact of important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • Summarize the significance of key events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March.
  • Interpret the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954.
  • Will identify the purpose and goals of education in American society and explain why African Americans chose to challenge segregated education in their quest for equality.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • analyze
  • interpret
  • discrimination
  • prejudice
  • protest (violent and non-violent)
  • boycott
  • sit-in
  • segregation
  • integration
  • Jim Crow
  • suffrage
  • rights
  • NAACP
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Many of the key leaders that were vital to the modern Civil Rights movement including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • How the Montgomery Bus Boycott and other forms of protest impacted Alabama's economy.
  • How the many forms of non-violent protests were used to help African Americans in Alabama gain equality including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Selma-to-Montgomery March, and children's marches.
  • African Americans in Alabama were often the victims of violence while trying to gain equality (Sixteenth Street Church bombing, Freedom Riders bus bombing).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Recognize important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • Describe events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March.
  • Interpret primary sources such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954, and Letters from the Birmingham Jail.
  • Use vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Many individuals and events had a social, political, and economic impact on the people of Alabama during the modern Civil Rights Movement. There were many benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown v. Board (1954).
  • The doctrine of separate but equal called for specific things.
  • These events also had a significant impact on the nation.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.14- Identify the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement; recognize important issues, leaders, and results of the movement.
SS.AAS.4.14a -Identify vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights.


Learning Objectives:

I will compare and contrast cultural differences during The Civil Rights movement.

  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
Before/Engage
Activity:

Students will explore the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by reading and viewing pictures on the website https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/explore/history/martin-luther-king-jr/  

There will be a class discussion after the students view the website. The class will discuss the life of Dr. King and his impact on society. For instance, the teacher may state that he was born in Atlanta, GA in 1929. The teacher may state during the time of Dr. King's life in the southern states of the United States of America, many schools were separated by the color of a person's skin. White children went to school with other white children and black children went to school with other black children. As a child, he was told that he could no longer play with a white boy because he was black. He wanted to change the culture or the way of life in order for people to not be judged by the color of their skin. He wanted equal treatment for all. 

The teacher will discuss the life of Dr. King and his positive impact on society such as the nonviolence marches that he led, the speeches that he gave, his most famous "I Have a Dream" Speech, and the Montgomery Bus Boycott that he led and how it allowed black people to sit wherever they wanted.

 

The educator will create a T-Chart on the board or paper so that the students can have a visual of the comparisons and contrasts between two cultures. The title of the T-Chart is the During the Life of Dr. King. One side of the T-Chart is labeled The Way Life Was. The other side of the T-Chart is labeled The Way Dr. King Wanted It To Be. The Teacher may ask the probing questions to guide the students' thinking: 1) When Dr. King was little, were black people allowed to sit in the front of a city bus? Why not? 2) When Dr. King was a child, did all children attend school together? 3) How was Dr. King's life different from your life? The following are some examples of the cultural differences that may go on the chart: 

The Way Life Was: 1) White people and black people had to pay to ride the city buses. However, if black people wanted to ride the city buses, they had to sit in the back of the buses. If the bus became filled, black people had to give up their seat and stand in order for white people to sit. 2) White people were able to sit in front of movie theaters; black people had to sit in the balcony. 3) Black children and white children did not attend school together. 4) Black people were arrested and threatened if they did not comply (go along) with how they were unfairly treated.

The Way Dr. King Wanted It To Be: 1) All people who paid to ride city buses be able to sit wherever they wanted and not to have to give up their seat. 2) All people could sit wherever they wanted in movie theaters. 3) All children would be able to attend school together; play together. 4) Dr. King wanted equal treatment for all.

Assessment Strategies:

The educator will check for understanding as the students verbally provide comparisons and contrasts between cultural differences.


Advanced Preparation:

The educator will need to have the website, https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/explore/history/martin-luther-king-jr/ ready to display.

Variation Tips (optional):

The educator may also choose to use Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s speech as a way to compare and contrast. https://www.archives.gov/files/press/exhibits/dream-speech.pdf

The educator may also choose to use Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s audio speech as a way to compare and contrast.  https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-papers/documents/i-have-dream-address-delivered-march-washington-jobs-and-freedom

Various speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. are available on youtube.

Notes or Recommendations (optional):
 
  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: conflicts, cultural differences, culture, Dr Martin Luther King, Jr, Martin Luther King Jr