ALEX Learning Activity

  

What's YOUR Metaphor?

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Mary Andrews
System:Lanett City
School:W. O. Lance Elementary
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 2363
Title:
What's YOUR Metaphor?
Digital Tool/Resource:
Flipgrid
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

Flipgrid is an online resource that allows students to produce a video recording in response to a particular topic and then share it with teachers and classmates.

This activity gives students the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of metaphor in a personal way. Students will reflect on their personal traits/characteristics, brainstorm an animal, object, etc, that shares similar qualities and write a speech about their chosen metaphor. Then they will perform, record, and share their speeches with the teacher and classmates through the online tool, Flipgrid.

This activity was created as a result of the ALEX Resource Development Summit.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
35 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.4.4]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.35- Report on a topic or tell a story, including a beginning, middle, and end and including relevant facts or details.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
42 ) Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. [L.4.5]

a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context. [L.4.5a]

b. Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs. [L.4.5b]

c. Demonstrate understanding of words by relating them to their opposites (antonyms) and to words with similar but not identical meanings (synonyms). [L.4.5c]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.42- Demonstrate understanding of simple and/or various forms of figurative language.
ELA.AAS.4.42c- Identify common synonyms and antonyms (e.g., happy-glad, hot-cold).


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 5
35 ) Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.5.4]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.5.35- Report on a topic, using a beginning, middle, and end and relevant facts and details; state an opinion about the topic.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 5
42 ) Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. [L.5.5]

a. Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context. [L.5.5a]

b. Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs. [L.5.5b]

c. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words. [L.5.5c]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.5.42- Demonstrate understanding of simple and/or various forms of figurative language.
ELA.AAS.5.42c- Identify common synonyms and antonyms (e.g., happy-glad, hot-cold).


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 6
34 ) Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. [SL.6.4]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.6.34- Present a claim, using a beginning, middle, and end and including relevant facts and details.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 6
39 ) Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. [L.6.3]

a. Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader or listener interest, and style.* [L.6.3a]

b. Maintain consistency in style and tone.* [L.6.3b]

Learning Objectives:

I can create a metaphor to represent myself based on my personality traits.

I can write a short speech that presents a topic statement, gives supporting details, and has a logical conclusion.

I can speak clearly and with appropriate tone, volume, pace, inflection, and eye contact.

  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
After/Explain/Elaborate
Activity:

This activity makes for a fun way for students to make introductions and get to know one another. It would be appropriate after a class discussion on figurative language, in particular metaphors.  Here are some examples if needed.

  •  Students brainstorm something that could represent them as a metaphor and think of three reasons why. Use this What's YOUR Metaphor worksheet.
  • Once students have decided on a metaphor, have them draw (or print) it on one index card. Write their name on a second index card. Then "sandwich"  a craft stick between the two cards, with the drawing and the student's name showing on either side and tape together. Clip the end of the craft stick into a clothespin so the nameplate "stands up". Alternately, you could have them make a "tent" style nameplate with stiff paper or tag board.
  • After students have made their nameplates, review with them qualities of a good oral presentation (eye contact, appropriate pace, tone, volume inflection, etc.). The teacher may want to model this or record their own Flipgrid video to use as a model.
  •  Direct students to the Flipgrip link, or open the app if using iPads or devices.  The students use a code to access your grid. Have them practice recording their personal metaphor speech. They will probably want to do several "takes" before they submit it.  
  • When all the students have submitted their recordings, you can project them for the whole class to watch together, or students can view them on their devices individually.  

 

 

Assessment Strategies:

A rubric can be used to assess personal metaphor speeches. An example rubric can be found here. Alternatively, Flipgrid has a built-in feedback rubric that teachers can complete for each student submission. The basic rubric rates the student on "Ideas" and "Performance" and provides a box for teachers to input text feedback.  the rubric can also be edited if the teacher wants to make it more specific.

 


Advanced Preparation:

The teacher needs to set up a free Flipgrid account. After creating an account, set up a class. Add this topic, Personal Metaphors, from the "disco library"  (library of pre-made topics).  

The teacher may want to create his/her own metaphor nameplate as an example and make his/her own personal metaphor speech recording to show the students.

Students will need access to devices that have a camera and microphone.

The teacher will need to provide each student with two index cards and one popsicle stick. 

Variation Tips (optional):
 
Notes or Recommendations (optional):

When students are recording their videos, the teacher may want to have the students go to a quiet location in the room or just have a few at a time doing the recording, as this activity can get noisy if everyone is recording at the same time.

  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: figurative language, metaphor, speaking skills