ALEX Learning Activity

  

I Have a Dream

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Beth Lane
System:
School:
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 248
Title:
I Have a Dream
Digital Tool/Resource:
Civil Rights Movement Video
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

The tool used is a video from schooltube.com. The video shows students taking on the roles of influential African Americans in the United States. At the end, the students are reciting the "I Have a Dream" speech by Martin Luther King Jr.  

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.4.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.4.2a]

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. [W.4.2b]

c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because). [W.4.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.4.2d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. [W.4.2e]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.23- Compose informative or explanatory texts by stating a topic, providing facts or details, and providing an appropriate conclusion related to the topic.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.4.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.4.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.4.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others. [SL.4.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. [SL.4.1d]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
35 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.4.4]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.35- Report on a topic or tell a story, including a beginning, middle, and end and including relevant facts or details.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the social, political, and economic impact of the modern Civil Rights Movement on Alabama.
  • Describe the impact of important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • Summarize the significance of key events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March.
  • Interpret the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954.
  • Will identify the purpose and goals of education in American society and explain why African Americans chose to challenge segregated education in their quest for equality.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • analyze
  • interpret
  • discrimination
  • prejudice
  • protest (violent and non-violent)
  • boycott
  • sit-in
  • segregation
  • integration
  • Jim Crow
  • suffrage
  • rights
  • NAACP
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Many of the key leaders that were vital to the modern Civil Rights movement including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • How the Montgomery Bus Boycott and other forms of protest impacted Alabama's economy.
  • How the many forms of non-violent protests were used to help African Americans in Alabama gain equality including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Selma-to-Montgomery March, and children's marches.
  • African Americans in Alabama were often the victims of violence while trying to gain equality (Sixteenth Street Church bombing, Freedom Riders bus bombing).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Recognize important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • Describe events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March.
  • Interpret primary sources such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954, and Letters from the Birmingham Jail.
  • Use vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Many individuals and events had a social, political, and economic impact on the people of Alabama during the modern Civil Rights Movement. There were many benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown v. Board (1954).
  • The doctrine of separate but equal called for specific things.
  • These events also had a significant impact on the nation.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.14- Identify the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement; recognize important issues, leaders, and results of the movement.
SS.AAS.4.14a -Identify vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights.


Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 4
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • produce authentic artifacts using digital tools.
  • review and revise authentic artifacts using digital tools.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • multimedia
  • artifacts
  • Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use a variety of digital tools in which they can create or revise authentic artifacts to share their knowledge.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design and create authentic artifacts using approved digital tools that meet COPPA guidelines.
  • review an authentic artifact to revise with new or additional information.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • everyone can be an author, producer, director, etc.
  • using digital tools.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 4
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use basic features of digital tools to communciate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • digital tools
  • communicate
  • key ideas
  • informs
  • persuades
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • digital tools are available that enable them to inform others.
  • digital tools are available that enable them to persuade others.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use basic features such as headings, text, and images to communicate key ideas that inform and/or persuade.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • digital tools can be used to communicate by informing and/or persuade others.
Learning Objectives:

Students will be able to create a skit (in small groups) of a scene that occurred during the Civil Rights Movement. Must use one piece of technology to present.

Students will present the scene to the class.

Students will write a reflection of the scene they presented and include why it was an important part of the Civil Rights Movement.

  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
Before/Engage
Activity:

The student(s) will watch the video clip from schooltube. The video clip will introduce the lesson to the students. After watching the video, class will discuss the Civil Rights Movement and its components. The students will then be divided into small groups and begin preparation for their skits. After presenting their skits to the class, students will write a reflection on their skits and why what they chose was an important part of the Civil Rights Movement.

Assessment Strategies:

To assess the skits, a rubric will be used. A rubric will also be used to assess the students' reflections on their skits and the Civil Rights Movement.

Rubric maker


Advanced Preparation:

Teachers will need to have the video on schooltube.com pulled up before the lesson. Teachers will also need to have their lesson and discussion for the class organized for after the video. Teachers may also want to have materials ready for students to use to prepare for their skits.

Variation Tips (optional):

The teacher may choose to sit students with visual and auditory impairments close to where the video will be viewed, so they can see and hear.

Site for preparing for skits:

Alabama Department of Archives

 

Notes or Recommendations (optional):
 
  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: