ALEX Learning Activity

  

Handful of Cubes

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Kimberly Henderson
System:Elmore County
School:Wetumpka Elementary School
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 2609
Title:
Handful of Cubes
Digital Tool/Resource:
Ten Frame Work Mat
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

This engaging learning activity will help students understand that the two digits in two-digit numbers represent the number of ones and tens. It will give the students opportunities to have hands-on experience making two-digit numbers using snap cubes. The students will visually see the numbers to begin comparing two-digit numbers.

This activity results from ALEX Resource Development Summit.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 1
11. Explain that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.
a. Identify a bundle of ten ones as a "ten."

b. Identify the numbers from 11 to 19 as composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

c. Identify the numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 as one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use a variety of representations (symbolic: 10+8. pictorial: one line and 8 dots. physical: place value blocks, bundles of sticks, or groups of fingers, etc.) to show and explain the decomposition of the number into groups of 10 and ones.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Base ten
  • Decompose
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to decompose numbers 11-19.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use place value models or mental strategies to decompose numbers.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a two-digit number represents amounts of tens and ones.
  • Ten things can be represented as one ten or as ten ones.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.11.1: Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
M.1.11.2: Represent numbers with multiple models.
Examples: models—base ten blocks, number lines, linking cubes, straw bundles.
M.1.11.3: Count to 100 by tens.
M.1.11.4: Count 10 objects.
M.1.11.5: Count to 10 by ones.
M.1.11.6: Name numerals 0 to 19.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Define ones and tens.
  • Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
  • Add numbers 1-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
  • Count objects up to 10.
  • Notice same/different and some/all.
  • Recognize numbers from 1-50.
  • Add one to a set of objects (up to 10 objects).
  • Given small groups of objects, create larger groups by combining the small groups.
  • Understand ten and 1 (ten 1's =10).
  • Put together two small groups of objects to create a larger group.
  • Understand number words.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture a drawing or objects.
  • Rote count to 10.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.11 Recognize and create sets of ten (limit to three sets).


Learning Objectives:

  • The student will understand that the two digits in a two-digit number represent the number of ones and tens.
  • The student will unitize a collection of 10 objects.
  • The student will represent a numeral with objects in groups of tens and ones.
  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
Before/Engage
Activity:

  1. Gather students on the floor.
  2. Tell students they will find baskets of cubes at their tables. The teacher should say, "The task will be for you and your partner to take turns grabbing a handful of cubes and to determine how many cubes you grabbed. Tell your partner how many cubes you have. Next, group your cubes into groups of tens and ones on the ten frame mat or into ten towers. Tell your partner what you find out (for e\xample:  I have 23 cubes, I have 2 groups of tens and 3 ones). Record the number of cubes and the number of groups of tens and ones in your math journal. Then play again for several rounds."
  3. After the instructions for the activity, the teacher will send students to tables to work at their assigned tables.
  4. The teacher should now distribute the workmat and instruct the students to begin working.
  5. As students work, the teacher should circulate and make notes about how students solve the task.
  6. After most students complete the task, bring the group back together.
  7. Based on your observations, call students to share their strategies. Remember to call on students with correct but simple solution strategies to share first before calling on students who demonstrated an understanding of unitizing tens and the value of the digits. (Example explanation might be:  "I have 12 cubes.  I know I have 12 because I filled up this ten frame on the work mat and I have 2 more on this ten frame. I grouped ten cubes into one ten and then counted 10, 11, 12")
  8. If time allows, the students can complete the activity again or on other occasions.
Assessment Strategies:

Questions to ask while circulating during the activity to assess student progress:

  • Does the student count the cubes one by one? If so, notice how they group them for counting. Does the student organize the cubes for the count in some kind of order (in a linear arrangement or random)?
  • Do they organize in groups of tens using ten frames?
  • Do students snap cubes together into groups of tens (unitize)?
  • Can students correctly record the number of cubes on the recording sheet, recognizing the number of tens and the number of ones in their collections?
  • Do they understand the value of each number? What does each number represent?

Advanced Preparation:

Prior to the lesson the teacher should:

  • prepare baskets of cubes with at least ten cubes that have tens and ones values.
  • prepare copies of the ten frames workmat.
  • determine partner pairings and create a table assignment list.
Variation Tips (optional):

  • Give students a larger amount of cubes.
  • Give students cards where they have to add to the number or take away from the given number.
  • For strugglers, use smaller numbers and model with them while asking questions to check for understanding.
Notes or Recommendations (optional):

ALCOS 2019

11. Explain that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.

a. Identify a bundle of ten ones as a “ten.”

b. Identify the numbers from 11 to 19 as composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

c. Identify the numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 as one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: composing, counting, modeling numbers, ones, place value, tens, twodigit numbers, understanding