ALEX Learning Activity

  

Moving From a Handful of Cubes to Tall Towers

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Kimberly Henderson
System:Elmore County
School:Wetumpka Elementary School
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 2611
Title:
Moving From a Handful of Cubes to Tall Towers
Digital Tool/Resource:
Number Cards 0-9
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

This learning activity will build students' understanding of place value. The students will work with a partner to play a game to build two-digit numbers in hopes of being the first to build a tower. This activity will lead to students' understanding of math and place value while being actively engaged in the activity.

This activity results from the ALEX Resource Development Summit.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 1
11. Explain that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.
a. Identify a bundle of ten ones as a "ten."

b. Identify the numbers from 11 to 19 as composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

c. Identify the numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 as one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use a variety of representations (symbolic: 10+8. pictorial: one line and 8 dots. physical: place value blocks, bundles of sticks, or groups of fingers, etc.) to show and explain the decomposition of the number into groups of 10 and ones.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Base ten
  • Decompose
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to decompose numbers 11-19.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use place value models or mental strategies to decompose numbers.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a two-digit number represents amounts of tens and ones.
  • Ten things can be represented as one ten or as ten ones.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.11.1: Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
M.1.11.2: Represent numbers with multiple models.
Examples: models—base ten blocks, number lines, linking cubes, straw bundles.
M.1.11.3: Count to 100 by tens.
M.1.11.4: Count 10 objects.
M.1.11.5: Count to 10 by ones.
M.1.11.6: Name numerals 0 to 19.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Define ones and tens.
  • Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
  • Add numbers 1-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
  • Count objects up to 10.
  • Notice same/different and some/all.
  • Recognize numbers from 1-50.
  • Add one to a set of objects (up to 10 objects).
  • Given small groups of objects, create larger groups by combining the small groups.
  • Understand ten and 1 (ten 1's =10).
  • Put together two small groups of objects to create a larger group.
  • Understand number words.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture a drawing or objects.
  • Rote count to 10.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.11 Recognize and create sets of ten (limit to three sets).


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 1
12. Compare pairs of two-digit numbers based on the values of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and < and orally with the words "is greater than," "is equal to," and "is less than."
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use place value terminology and concepts to explain and justify the use of <, =, > to compare the numbers and create true equalities and inequalities.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Equalities
  • Inequalities
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to compare quantities using the terminology "greater than", "equal to", and "less than".
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • compare 2-digit numbers.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • numbers can be decomposed to determine if the amount is greater than, equal to, or less than, how that can be done.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.12.1: Define greater than, less than and equal to.
M.1.12.2: Demonstrate greater than, less than, and equal to using manipulatives, object drawings or numbers 0 to 10.
M.1.12.3: Use comparison vocabulary.
Examples: greater than, equal to, and less than.
M.1.12.4: Recognize symbols for greater than, less than and equal to.
M.1.12.5: Determine the value of the digits in the ones and tens place.
M.1.12.6: Identify sets with more, less or equal objects.
M.1.12.7: Imitate creating sets of a given size.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Define ones and tens.
  • Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
  • Add numbers 1-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
  • Count objects up to 10.
  • Define greater than, less than, and equal to.
  • Count to 20 by ones.
  • Count objects up to ten.
  • Understand amount words, such as more, less, and another.
  • Begin to understand that parts of an object can make a whole.
  • Become more interested in the concept of some and all.
  • Be interested in who has more or less.
  • Understand the concept of "less than."
  • Mimic counting by ones.
  • Recognize numbers from one to ten.
  • Become interested in how many objects she/he has.
  • Understand the concept of size and amount.
  • Given a set number of objects one through ten, answer the question "how many?"
  • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many?"
  • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.12 Using vocalization, sign language, augmentative communication, or assistive technology, compare two groups of 10 or fewer items using appropriate vocabulary (e.g., more, less, equal) when the number of items in each group is similar.


Learning Objectives:

  • The student will build numbers showing how many tens and ones compose a given number up to 99.
  • The student will understand that two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.
  • The student will use mathematical words to compare the values of two numbers.
  • The students will compare numbers up to 99.
  • The students will record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and < and orally with the words “is greater than,” “is equal to,” and “is less than.”
  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
During/Explore/Explain
Activity:

  1. The teacher will model with the class how to draw two number cards and make the greater number. Example: If 1 and 5 are drawn the student could make a 15 or 51. 51 has 5 tens and 1 one and 15 has 1 ten and 5 ones. 51 is greater than 15 so 51 is the number to use. The two players agree that the greater number has been made.
  2. The teacher will discuss with the class the procedures for building the number with "tens cubes" to show tens and "ones cubes" to show ones.
  3. The teacher will draw two number cards and the students will reply with the greatest number that can be made with the two number cards. Then repeat for understanding.
  4. The teacher will model the "math talk" for comparing the two numbers. Example of a "math talk":  Partner 1 says, "I have 61.  61 is 6 tens and 1 one."  Partner 2 says, "I have 67.  67 has 6 tens and 7 ones."  Partner 1 says, "We both have 6 tens."  Partner 2 says, "But I have 7 ones and you have 1 one.  So 67 is greater than 61.
  5. The teacher will then send students to their assigned groups.
  6. The teacher will make sure each pair of players has a deck of number cards that have been shuffled and snap cubes for building towers.
  7. Player 1 draws two number cards and shows the number that is greater after having a "math talk" with his/her partner.
  8. Player 1 uses "tens cubes" to represent the number showing tens and "ones cubes" showing ones.
  9. Player 2 repeats what player 1 did and "tens cubes" and "ones cubes" to represent his/her number.
  10. The players will decide which number is greater and write the of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and < on a sheet of paper.  The player with the greater number takes a cube to start his/her tower. 
  11. As students work, the teacher should circulate and make notes about how students solve the task.
  12. The first player to earn 10 snap cubes on his/her tower is the winner.
Assessment Strategies:

As students play the game ask these questions to determine student progress and understanding of the standards:

  • How do you know the number you made with your number cards is the greater number?
  • What strategy did you and your partner use to determine which number is greater?
  • Who won, and how did you determine that?

Advanced Preparation:

The teacher will need to:

  • prepare 20 snap cubes for each pair of students to build their towers.
  • prepare enough "tens cubes" and "ones cubes" for each pair of students.
  • reproduce a deck with three sets of cards numbered 0-9 for each pair of players.
  • prepare a list of names for working pairs of students prior to the lesson.
  • Students will need a sheet of paper to write their of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.
  • Assess the students' mathematical understanding of the values of two-digit numbers before playing the game.
Variation Tips (optional):

  • The teacher could allow the students to draw three cards instead of two.
  • The teacher could use a number line if students have misconceptions about making the greater number with the two number cards.
  • The teacher could use a smaller range of numbers if a student is struggling to compare numbers.
  • The teacher could use 120 boards to compare numbers to increase rigor.
Notes or Recommendations (optional):

ALCOS 2019 

11. Explain that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.
a. Identify a bundle of ten ones as a “ten.”
b. Identify the numbers from 11 to 19 as composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
c. Identify the numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 as one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

12. Compare pairs of two-digit numbers based on the values of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and < and orally with the words “is greater than,” “is equal to,” and “is less than.”

  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: comparing, composing, counting, greater than, modeling numbers, ones, place value, tens, twodigit numbers, understanding