ALEX Learning Activity

  

Koosh!! You're Out!

A Learning Activity is a strategy a teacher chooses to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill using a digital tool/resource.

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  This learning activity provided by:  
Author: Joicelyn Armbrester
System:Oxford City
School:Oxford High School
  General Activity Information  
Activity ID: 47
Title:
Koosh!! You're Out!
Digital Tool/Resource:
SMART Exchange Koosh Ball Template
Web Address – URL:
Overview:

In this learning activity, students will explain the causes of World War II and key events through an interactive SMART Board game played with Koosh balls.  This interactive game download allows SMART Board users to customize the template to review various curricular concepts, terms, dates, and events.  Students will play this game by throwing one or more Koosh balls (or other soft object such as a bean bag) at the Smart Board. Each circle is linked to a different page in the notebook.  The teacher will need to fill in the pages with sight words, math facts, review questions, etc.

  Associated Standards and Objectives  
Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
3 ) Trace the chronology of events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, passage of the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, passage of the Intolerable Acts, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the publication of Common Sense, and the signing of the Declaration of Independence. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Explaining the role of key revolutionary leaders, including George Washington; John Adams; Thomas Jefferson; Patrick Henry; Samuel Adams; Paul Revere; Crispus Attucks; and Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette
•  Explaining the significance of revolutionary battles, including Bunker Hill, Trenton, Saratoga, and Yorktown
•  Summarizing major ideas of the Declaration of Independence, including the theories of John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau
•  Comparing perspectives of differing groups in society and their roles in the American Revolution, including men, women, white settlers, free and enslaved African Americans, and American Indians
•  Describing how provisions of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 affected relations of the United States with European nations and American Indians
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the significance of events, leaders, important battles, major political and social theories and philosophies, perspectives of different groups in society, and the impact of political documents on the causes of the American Revolution, the course of the war, and the relationships of the United States with Europe and Native Americans after the war.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • chronology
  • significance
  • theory
  • perspectives
  • provisions
Knowledge:
Students know:
    Details of important events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, passage of the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, passage of the Intolerable Acts, the Battle of Lexington and Concord, the publication of Common Sense, and the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
  • The role of key revolutionary leaders, including George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, Crispus Attucks, Gilbert du Motier, and Marquis de Lafayette.
  • The importance of key revolutionary battles, including Bunker Hill, Trenton, Saratoga, and Yorktown.
  • Influence of the theories of John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau on the major ideas in the Declaration of the Declaration of Independence.
  • Perspectives of differing groups in society and their roles in the American Revolution including men, women, white settlers, free and enslaved African Americans, and American Indians.
  • Provisions of the Treaty of Paris of 1783.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Trace the chronology of events leading up to the American Revolution by following the course, movement, and development of the event.
  • Analyze and explain the role of key revolutionary leaders by interpreting the significance of these individuals.
  • Trace the geographic locations of important Revolutionary battles and explain the significance of each. Summarize the major ideas of the Declaration of Independence .
  • Analyze the theories of John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau and relate these to the major ideas within the Declaration of Independence.
  • Compare the perspectives of differing groups in society and their roles in the American Revolution by showing the similarities and differences in these groups.
  • Analyze the impact of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 on the United States' relationship with European nations and American Indians.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were significant events, leaders, important battles, major political and social theories and philosophies, perspectives of different groups in society, and political documents that had an impact on the causes of the American Revolution, the course of the war, and the relationships of the United States with Europe and Native Americans after the war.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.3- Recognize the importance of major events leading up to the American Revolution including the French and Indian War, passage of the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, passage of the Intolerable Acts, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the publication of Common Sense, and the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
SS.AAS.10.3a - List the major provisions of the Treaty of Paris 1783.
SS.AAS.10.3b - Compare the First and Second Continental Congresses.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the causes and events of the United States' military involvement in World War I in order to determine the long-term social, political, and economic impact on the United States.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • World War I
  • Treaty of Versailles
  • mobilization
  • imperialism
  • nationalism
  • militarism
  • nativism
  • fascist
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I.
  • Social and political changes and attitudes in the United States related to involvement in World War I, including: American neutrality, mobilization, economic changes, and political changes.
  • The role of imperialism, militarism, nationalism, nativism, and the alliance system in World War I.
  • Geographical and political boundaries of Europe and the Middle East, pre- and post-World War I.
  • Controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations.
  • Short- and long-term effects of the Treaty of Versailles.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Explain the changing role of the United States during specific historical periods and in relationship to specific historical events.
  • Describe the effects of political and social movements and ideologies.
  • Analyze the social and political causes, events, and impact of specific historical events.
  • Identify geographical and political changes related to specific historical events.
  • Analyze controversies related to political policies, plans, and agreements.
  • Analyze primary and secondary sources.
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many causes and effects of the United States' military involvement in World War I and these had significant social, political, and economic impact on the United States.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.4- Define militarism, nationalism, imperialism, and alliances; understand that the United States entry into World War I had a significant impact on the outcome of the war; identify the consequences of World War I.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate the events and policies leading up to World War II.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Fascism
  • Nazism
  • Communism
  • Isolationism
  • Holocaust
  • appeasement
  • invasion
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The events that lead to World War II.
  • The impact of political movements such as fascism, Nazism, and communism on conflicts in Europe.
  • The effects of isolationism, including the debate about United States isolationism and changes in attitudes after Pearl Harbor.
  • Roles of significant World War II leaders, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler.
  • The impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media.
  • Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information related to historical events.
  • Read and comprehend historical texts independently and proficiently on various topics related to events that led to WWII and the effect of those events on American foreign policy today.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many events and policies leading up to WWII.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.8- Identify events leading to the outbreak of World War II; define Fascism, Nazism, Communism, appeasement, and neutrality. Identify Axis and Allied powers during World War II. Identify militarism of the Axis Powers. Recognize U.S. attempts to remain neutral.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
9 ) Describe the significance of major battles, events, and consequences of World War II campaigns, including North Africa, Midway, Normandy, Okinawa, the Battle of the Bulge, Iwo Jima, and the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Locating on a map or globe the major battles of World War II and the extent of the Allied and Axis territorial expansion
•  Describing military strategies of World War II, including blitzkrieg, island-hopping, and amphibious landings
•  Explaining reasons for and results of dropping atomic bombs on Japan
•  Explaining events and consequences of war crimes committed during World War II, including the Holocaust, the Bataan Death March, the Nuremberg Trials, the post-war Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the Genocide Convention
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain the impact of key events and battles of WWII on the outcome of the war and the relationships between countries in the post-war world.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • WWII campaigns
  • Midway
  • Normandy
  • Okinawa
  • Battle of the Bulge
  • Iwo Jima
  • Yalta Conference
  • Potsdam Conference
  • allied and axis expansion
  • Blitzkrieg
  • island-hopping
  • amphibious landings
  • atomic bomb
  • Holocaust
  • Bataan Death March
  • Nuremberg Trials
  • Declaration of Human Rights
  • Genocide Convention
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Major battles, events, and consequences of World War II campaigns.
  • The location on a map of major battles of WWII and the territorial claims of the different WWII powers.
  • Military strategies used in WWII.
  • Reasons for and results of dropping atomic bombs on Japan.
  • Events, incidents, and consequences of war crimes committed during WWII.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Locate specific points on a map and identify political, social, and geographic changes that occurred during or as a result of a historical event.
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media.
  • Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information related to historical events.
  • Read and comprehend historical texts independently and proficiently on various topics related to events that led to WWII and the effect of those events on American foreign policy today.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many key events and battles of WWII that had an impact on the outcome of the war, and the relationships between countries in the post-war world.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.9 - Define blitzkrieg, genocide, island - hopping, and concentration camps; locate key locations involved in World War II that led to global conflict; identify key events, people, and/or strategies involved in World War II.


Learning Objectives:

Students will identify, describe, and explain the causes of World War II, key events, and historical figures.

  Strategies, Preparations and Variations  
Phase:
During/Explore/Explain, After/Explain/Elaborate
Activity:

  1. Prior to the designated class teacher will customize the interactive Koosh ball template by entering facts, vocabulary words, dates, and key individuals. 
  2. After completing a series of lectures/lessons or unit of study, students may be divided into teams (pre-grouped or random grouping acceptable).
  3. Members from each team will take turns (individually) throwing a Koosh ball or other soft object (i.e. bean bag) at the SMART board thus revealing a question, stem, term, or date that they then must define or explain.
  4. Correct responses earn one point for their teams.
  5. Points are recorded and the team with the most points receives a reward (instructor discretion).
Assessment Strategies:

  1. Participation points may be given by the instructor according to student input in the game.
  2. Instructors may also use this game as a formative assessment strategy to gauge student understanding of individual concepts and ideas. 
  3. Instructors may then use this data to adjust future instruction or revisit previous instruction.

Advanced Preparation:

  • Prior to attempting this lesson, the instructor must download/install SMART Express software at http://express.smarttech.com/.
  • Once the software has been installed, instructors will need to customize the template with content materials.
  • Instructors may also choose to divide their students into teams prior to the lesson/game.
Variation Tips (optional):
 
Notes or Recommendations (optional):

There are "dead spaces" between the shapes that when hit with the Koosh ball do nothing and therefore students assume that they have lost their turn.  Instructors should develop a plan as to how to deal with this and address the situation prior to beginning the game with students.

  Keywords and Search Tags  
Keywords and Search Tags: World War II