ALEX Learning Activity Resources

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ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (11) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (11) 22 :
22 ) Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 19-21 above.) [W.11-12.4]

Subject: English Language Arts (11)
Title: What It Means to Be an American Found Poem
Description:

This learning activity should be used after students have analyzed and examined three informational texts in order to answer the Big Question, "What does it mean to be an American?" Students will then use textual evidence from one text in order to produce a found poem as a whole class. This activity provides students the ability to approach poetry in a non-threatening manner, while also asking students to look past only explicit meaning in texts. Found poetry is the literary equivalent to a collage, so students respond to this activity positively because of its creative nature.    

This activity was created as a result of the ALEX Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (7) 10 :
10 ) Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.7.1]

[ELA2015] (7) 25 :
25 ) Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources. [W.7.6]

[ELA2015] (8) 10 :
10 ) Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.8.1]

[ELA2015] (9) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.9-10.1]

[ELA2015] (10) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.9-10.1]

[ELA2015] (11) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (12) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[DLIT] (7) 22 :
16) Construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Examples: Design a multi-media children's e-book with an appropriate readability level.

[DLIT] (7) 23 :
17) Publish content to be available for external feedback.

[DLIT] (8) 23 :
17) Communicate and publish individually or collaboratively to persuade peers, experts, or community about issues and problems.

[HE1] (8) 13 :
13 ) Explain why mixing drugs can cause injury, illness, and death.

[HE1] (9-12) 15 :
15 ) Identify effects on health and behavior regarding the use of chemical substances, including prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

[HE1] (7) 7 :
7 ) Demonstrate decision-making skills as they relate to situations involving health risks.

Examples: responding appropriately to sexual harassment, avoiding physical conflict, objecting to verbal and physical bullying, avoiding inappropriate electronic communication

Subject: English Language Arts (7 - 12), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 8), Health (7 - 12)
Title: Drugs and the Teen Brain (HyperDoc - Website Creation)
Description:

The students will synthesize information to learn how their brain develops and why using drugs and alcohol is especially risky for teens. Students will use this information to design, create, and publish a Google Site that explains why teens are more at risk for becoming addicted to drugs than adults.

This activity was created as a result of the ALEX Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (11) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (11) 15 :
15 ) Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text. [RI.11-12.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (11)
Title: Flipping Out Over Cartoons: Rhetorical Analysis of Editorial Cartoons
Description:

In this learning activity, students will focus on a rhetorical analysis of visual texts to determine an author's purpose and message. First, students will view a video on how to analyze political or editorial cartoons. By identifying and analyzing labels, symbols, exaggeration, irony, analogy, and argument, students will be able to infer the artist's/author's intended message of the editorial cartoon. Then, students will practice analyzing other cartoons with the same process utilizing the tech tool Flipgrid. (from Common Sense Education:  Flipgrid is a website that allows teachers to create "grids" of short discussion-style questions that students respond to through recorded videos. Each grid is effectively a message board where teachers can pose a question and their students can post 90-second video responses that appear in a tiled "grid" display.)

This activity results from the ALEX Resource Gap Project.




ALEX Learning Activities: 3

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