ALEX Lesson Plan

     

What do Plants Need?

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Linda Ponder
System: Shelby County
School: Inverness Elementary School
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 2173

Title:

What do Plants Need?

Overview/Annotation:

In this lesson, students will understand that in order to grow healthy plants, soil, water, light, and air must be provided. Students will use math skills such as measurement and science process skills such as observation, comparing, and recording data.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 2
5 ) Plan and carry out an investigation, using one variable at a time (e.g., water, light, soil, air), to determine the growth needs of plants.


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
E4.5: Natural materials have different properties that sustain plant and animal life.

NAEP Statement::
E4.7: The Sun warms the land, air, and water and helps plants grow.

NAEP Statement::
L4.1: Organisms need food, water, and air; a way to dispose of waste; and an environment in which they can live.*

NAEP Statement::
L4.2: Organisms have basic needs. Animals require air, water, and a source of energy and building material for growth and repair. Plants also require light.

NAEP Statement::
L4.3: Organisms interact and are interdependent in various ways, including providing food and shelter to one another. Organisms can survive only in environments in which their needs are met. Some interactions are beneficial; others are detrimental to the organism and other organisms.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and Effect
Disciplinary Core Idea: Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Plan and carry out an investigation of the growth needs of plants to collect data on the effects of providing/withholding enough water, light, nutrients, and air.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Investigation
  • Variable
  • Water
  • Light
  • Soil
  • Air
  • Nutrients
  • Causes
  • Effects
  • Isolate
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Basic growth needs of plants include water, nutrients, light, and air.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Conduct an investigation to produce data used as evidence.
  • Determine the growth needs of plants.
  • Collaboratively develop an investigation plan that describes key features of the investigation and isolates variables as needed.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are observable patterns present in the growth of plants that can be used to determine the needs of plants.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Plants and Bugs
Plant Growth and Development, STC
The Best of Bugs: Designing Hand Pollinators, EiE

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.2.5- Participate in investigations of the growth needs of plants (e.g., water, light, soil, air) over a period of time.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: K
15. Classify objects into given categories of 10 or fewer; count the number of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

a. Categorize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
Given a group of objects,
  • sort the objects into categories (no more than ten objects in any category).
  • Count the number of objects in each category.
  • Order the categories by count.
  • Justify their reasoning.
  • Discuss information conveyed in analyzing graphs.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Classify
  • Venn diagrams
  • Pictographs
  • Yes/no charts
  • Bar graphs
  • Symbolic representations
  • Pictorial representations
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to count.
  • Sort objects.
  • Category descriptors (e.g. triangles, rectangles, round, curved sides, color, etc).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • sort objects.
  • Effectively use strategies to count groups of objects.
  • Read and understand graphs.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • objects can be grouped into categories based on like characteristics.
  • They can gain information from graphs.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.K.15.1: Identify more and less when given two groups of objects.
M.K.15.2: Identify object attributes.
Examples: color, shape, size, texture, use.
M.K.15.3: Count objects up to ten.
M.K.15.4: Count to 10 by ones.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Participate in creating charts or graphs to represent data collection.
  • Notice same/different and some/all.
  • Recognize numbers from one to ten.
  • Given a group of objects (ten or less), divide the group into smaller groups in various ways.
  • Given small groups of objects, create larger groups by combining the small groups.
  • Take away objects from a large group to create two smaller groups.
  • Put together two small groups of objects to create a larger group.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture a drawing or objects.
  • Rote count to ten.
  • Begin to name and match colors, sizes, and shapes.
  • Enjoy playing with all kinds of objects.
  • Point to matching or similar objects.
  • Understand that words can label sameness and differences.
  • Understand that some have more, and some have less.
  • Sort objects based on shape or color.
  • Name and match primary colors.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.K.15 Explore a simple pictograph (limited to two categories and limit a combined quantity of 5 for both categories).


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: K
17. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common to see which object has "more of" or "less of" the attribute and describe the difference.

Example: Directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as "taller" or "shorter."
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use direct comparisons of physical objects to determine and explain which object has more of or less of the attribute.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Attribute
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to describe similarities and differences in objects.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Directly compare two objects and explain which object has more of or less of the attribute.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • objects and geometric figures have measurable attributes that allow them to be compared.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.K.17.1: Use vocabulary related to length and weight.
Example: longer, shorter, heavier, lighter.
M.K.17.2: Identify objects by length and weight.
Example: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
M.K.17.3: Sort objects according to measurable attributes.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Notice same/different and some/all.
  • Begin to name and match colors, sizes, and shapes.
  • Enjoy playing with all kinds of objects.
  • Point to matching or similar objects.
  • Understand that words can label sameness and differences.
  • Understand that some have more, and some have less.
  • Sort objects based on shape or color.
  • Name and match primary colors.
  • Sort objects on the basis of both color and shape.
  • Sort a variety of objects in a group that have one thing in common.
  • Recognize and sort familiar objects with the same color, shape, or size.
  • Understand the concept of same shape and size.
  • Understand the concept of smallest and shortest.
  • Understand the concept of light and heavy.
  • Understand the concept long and short.
  • Classify common objects according to height (tall/short).
  • Classify common objects according to length (long/short).
  • Classify common objects according to weight (heavy/light).
  • Classify common objects according to size (big/small).
  • Communicate long, short, heavy, light, big, small.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.K.16 Classify objects according to attributes (e.g., big/small, heavy/light, tall/short).


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 1
16. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories.

a. Ask and answer questions about the total number of data points in organized data.

b. Summarize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.

c. Determine "how many" in each category using up to three categories of data.

d. Determine "how many more" or "how many less" are in one category than in another using data organized into two or three categories.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • will create a table or chart to organize and represent data with up to three categories using physical objects, tally mark graphs, pictographs, Venn diagrams, yes/no charts, or bar graphs.
  • analyze and interpret the data verbally and in writing by asking and answering questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, or how many more or less are in one category than in another.
  • use measurement vocabulary such as most, least, more than, less than, and similar comparison words.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Tally mark graphs
  • Pictographs
  • Venn diagrams
  • Yes/no charts
  • Bar graphs
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • objects can be grouped into categories based on like characteristics.
  • they can gain information from graphs.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create, analyze, and interpret data.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • questions concerning mathematical contexts can be answered by collecting and organizing data.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.16.1: Define more and less.
M.1.16.2: Describe methods for representing data.
Examples: pictographs, tally charts, bar graphs, and Venn Diagrams.
M.1.16.3: Locate information on data displays.
M.1.16.4: Classify objects into given categories; count the number of objects in each category, and sort the categories by count.
M.1.16.5: Recognize different types of data displays.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Identify more and less when given two groups of objects.
  • Identify object attributes.
    Examples: color, shape, size, texture, use.
  • Count objects up to ten.
  • Count to 10 by ones.
  • Understand a different types of graphs (ex. Venn diagram, bar graphs and pictograph).
  • Identify more and less when given two groups of objects of 10 or fewer.
  • Count objects up to 10.
  • Count to 10 by ones.
  • Understand categories.
  • Identify object attributes.
    Examples: color, shape, size, texture, purpose.
  • Count to 1-20.
  • Mimic counting by ones.
  • Recognize numerals from 0-20.
  • Understand the concept of amount.
  • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many?"
  • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
  • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group (up to ten objects).

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.16 Sort objects or pictures into common categories (e.g., shapes, pets, fruits; limited to two categories and a combined total of 15 objects/pictures for the categories).


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 1
18. Determine the length of an object using non-standard units with no gaps or overlaps, expressing the length of the object with a whole number.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • accurately measure length using non-standard units (e.g., paper clips, Cuisenaire rods).
  • understand that units must be laid end to end with no gaps or overlaps when measuring.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Non-standard units
  • Iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • measurable attributes of objects, specifically length.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • accurately measure length using non-standard units (to the nearest whole unit).
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • the smaller the unit, the more units will be needed to measure the object.
  • the larger the unit, the fewer units needed to measure an object.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.18.1: Describe gap and overlap.
M.1.18.2: Describe what it means to measure using non-standard units.
M.1.18.3: Model measuring using non-standard units.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Use vocabulary related to length and weight.
    Example: longer, shorter, heavier, lighter.
  • Identify objects by length and weight.
    Example: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
  • Sort objects according to measurable attributes.
  • Define length and weight.
  • Explore objects in relationship to length and weight.
  • Define more, less, length, width, weight and height.
  • Use vocabulary related to length, width, weight and height.
    Examples: longer, shorter, heavier, lighter, small, big.
  • Identify objects by length, weight and height.
    Examples: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
  • Sort objects according to non-measurable attributes.
  • Understanding concepts of small, big, heavy, light, tall, short.
  • Understand concept of too much or too little.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.17 Compare and determine lengths of objects using non-standard units of measurements (real or pictures) in terms of longer/shorter and taller/shorter.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 2
15. Measure lengths of several objects to the nearest whole unit.

a. Create a line plot where the horizontal scale is marked off in whole-number units to show the lengths of several measured objects.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • use line plots (whole number scale) to display the data generated by measuring lengths of several objects.
  • communicate questions and descriptions related to the data display.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Line plots
  • Repeated measurement
  • Whole unit
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • to use graphs to make observations about the data.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use standard units and the related tools to measure length to the nearest whole unit.
  • organize and represent length measurement data on a line plot.
  • analyze data.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • questions concerning mathematical contexts can be answered by collecting and organizing data and displaying the data in line plots.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.2.15.1: Define length and line plot.
M.2.15.2: Use vocabulary related to comparison of length.
Examples: longer, shorter, longest, shortest, taller.
M.2.15.3: Demonstrate rounding up to the nearest whole unit on measurement tools.
M.2.15.4: Demonstrate measuring length using standard units.
M.2.15.5: Describe a line plot.
M.2.15.6: Model measuring length using standard units.
M.2.15.7: Identify objects by length.
M.2.15.8: Sort objects according to length.
M.2.15.9: Explore objects in relationship to length.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Define more, less, length, width, weight and height.
  • Identify objects by length and height.
    Examples: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
  • Identify objects by length.
    Examples: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
  • Sort objects according to measurable attributes.
  • Sort objects according to non-measurable attributes.
  • Use comparative language (longer/shorter, taller/shorter) for the attributes of objects related to length.
  • Communicate long, tall, short.
  • Recognize the length attributes of objects (long/short, tall/short).
  • Recognize length as the measurement of something from end to end.
  • Understanding concepts of small, big, tall, short.
  • Use manipulatives and counting.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects.
  • Write numerals 0-20.
  • Mimic marking Xs on number line.
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 2
16. Create a picture graph and bar graph to represent data with up to four categories.

a. Using information presented in a bar graph, solve simple "put-together," "take-apart," and "compare" problems.

b. Using Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts, analyze data to predict an outcome.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • collect data.
  • represent data in picture graph or bar graph format.
  • share a summary of that data.
  • share conclusions.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Pictographs
  • Venn diagrams
  • Yes/no charts
  • Bar graphs
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • strategies for collecting, organizing, and recording data.
  • strategies for counting and comparing quantities.
  • strategies for solving addition and subtraction problems.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • choose and apply appropriate strategies for organizing and recording data.
  • read and interpret graphical representations (pictographs and bar graphs) of data.
  • communicate and defend solutions and solution paths.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • questions concerning mathematical contexts can be answered by collecting and organizing data on pictographs and bar graphs.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.2.16.1: Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve addition and subtraction word problems with an unknown number.
M.2.16.2: Describe picture graph and bar graph.
M.2.16.3: Demonstrate conceptual understanding of adding or subtracting using a variety of materials.
M.2.16.4: Use vocabulary related to comparing data.
Examples: more than, less than, most, least, equal.
M.2.16.5: Recognize attributes of data displays.
M.2.16.6: Locate information on data displays.
M.2.16.7: Classify objects into given categories.
M.2.16.8: Sort the categories by count.
M.2.16.9: Recognize different types of data displays.
M.2.16.10: Count objects up to 50.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Understand different types of graphs (ex. Venn diagram, bar graphs and pictograph).
  • Identify more and less when given two groups of objects of 10 or fewer.
  • Understand that words can label sameness and differences.
  • Understand categories.
  • Identify object attributes.
    Examples: color, shape, size, texture, purpose.
  • Sort objects on the basis of both color and shape.
  • Sort a variety of objects in a group that have one thing in common.
  • Recognize numerals from 0-20.
  • Understand the concept of amount.
  • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
  • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group (up to ten objects).
  • Recognize numerals 0-10.
  • Add one to a set of objects (up to 10 objects).
  • Put together two small groups of objects to create a larger group to represent adding.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.2.16 Using vocalization, sign language, augmentative communication, or assistive technology, use a graph, limited to 2 categories, to answer more/less, most/least, or equal to questions (a combined total of no more than 30 objects/pictures shown for the 2 categories).


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 2
17. Measure the length of an object by selecting and using standard units of measurement shown on rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, or measuring tapes.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • choose appropriate tools and units of measurement based on size of object.
  • measure objects correctly.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Standard units of measurement
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • standard units of length measure (inches, feet, yards, centimeters and meters) and the related tools.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • measure length in standard units (inches, feet, yards, centimeters and meters).
  • choose and accurately use appropriate measurement tools and units of measure.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • without overlaps or gaps.
  • the length of the object is expressed as the number of unit lengths needed to cover the same distance.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.2.17.1: Identify units of measurement for length.
Examples: inches, feet, yard; centimeter, meters.
M.2.17.2: Demonstrate how to use measurement tools.
Example: avoiding gaps and overlaps.
M.2.17.3: Identify measurement tools.
M.2.17.4: Model measuring using non-standard units.
M.2.17.5: Order three objects by length.
M.2.17.6: Compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object.
M.2.17.7: Describe measurable attributes of objects such as length or weight.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Define more, less, length, width, weight and height.
  • Identify objects by length and height.
    Examples: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
  • Identify objects by length.
    Examples: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
  • Sort objects according to measurable attributes.
  • Sort objects according to non-measurable attributes.
  • Use comparative language (longer/shorter, taller/shorter) for the attributes of objects related to length.
  • Communicate long, tall, short.
  • Recognize the length attributes of objects (long/short, tall/short).
  • Recognize length as the measurement of something from end to end.
  • Understanding concepts of small, big, tall, short.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.2.17 Using vocalization, sign language, augmentative communication, or assistive technology, identify standard tools associated with measurement (clock, ruler, scale, measuring cup); measure the lengths of objects using nonstandard units (e.g., hands, paper clips).


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 2
20. Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference of the two objects using standard units of length.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • select appropriate tools for measuring.
  • measure lengths of two objects.
  • determine how much longer one object is than another.
  • express the length differences for the two objects using centimeters, inches, meters, or yards.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Standard units of length
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • strategies for comparing the length of objects.
  • standard units of length.
  • related tools.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • choose and accurately use appropriate measurement tools and units of measure.
  • explain and justify procedures for determining the difference between the lengths of two objects.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • comparisons of objects are determined using attributes that are measurable.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.2.20.1: Measure objects using standard units.
M.2.20.2: Record lengths with appropriate units.
M.2.20.3: Use subtraction within 20 to solve problems.
M.2.20.4: Compare length using non-standard units to determine which is longer.
M.2.20.5: Use vocabulary related to comparison of length.
Examples: longer, shorter, longest, shortest, and taller.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Define more, less, length.
  • Use vocabulary related to length.
    Examples: longer, shorter.
  • Identify objects by length.
    Examples: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
  • Sort objects according to measurable attributes.
  • Use comparative language (longer/shorter, taller/shorter) for the attributes of objects related to length.
  • Communicate long, tall, short.
  • Recognize the length attributes of objects (long/short, tall/short).
  • Recognize length as the measurement of something from end to end.
  • Understand different forms of measurement (inches, centimeters).
  • Understand ruler.
  • Match numerals to objects or drawings.
  • Identify numerals 0 to 20.
  • Count from 0 to 20.
  • Add and subtract numbers within 20 using objects, pictures and fingers.
  • Take a smaller set out of a larger set.
  • Combine two sets to make a larger set up to twenty.
  • Count items in a set up to twenty.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects.
  • Understand one less than a number 2 through 20.
  • Understand one more than a number 1 through 20.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.2.19 Order three objects by length (long/longer/longest; short/shorter/shortest).


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 3
19. Estimate and measure liquid volumes and masses of objects using liters (l), grams (g), and kilograms (kg).

a. Use the four operations to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes given in the same metric units.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Accurately measure the liquid volume and mass of objects by selecting and using appropriate tools (such as balance and spring scales, graduated cylinders, beakers, and measuring cups) to determine measures to the nearest whole unit.
  • Given an image of a measurement device, determine the volume or mass shown in the image.
  • Use the four operations to solve one-step word problems involving liquid volume or mass measurements.
  • Given two measurement quantities or two images of a measuring device, determine the total volume/mass, or find the difference between the two volumes/masses.
  • Given the volume or mass of an object, determine the volume/mass of more than one object using multiplication.
  • Given the total volume or mass of multiple identical objects, determine the volume/mass of a single object using division.
  • Explain and justify solutions using a variety of representations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Liquid volume
  • Mass
  • Liter
  • Gram
  • Kilogram
  • Metric unit
  • Capacity
  • Matter
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Personal benchmarks for metric standard units of measure, mass (gram & kilogram) and liquid volume (liter), and the use of related tools (such as balance, spring scales, graduated cylinders, beakers, measuring cups) for measurement to those units.
  • Characteristics of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division contexts that involve measurements.
  • How to represent quantities and operations physically, pictorially, or symbolically.
  • Strategies to solve one-step word problems that involve measurement.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Measure liquid volume and mass in metric standard units.
  • Choose appropriate measurement tools and units of measure.
  • Represent quantities and operations physically, pictorially, or symbolically,
  • Use a variety of strategies to solve one-step word problems that involve measurement.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Capacity indicates the measure of the volume (dry or liquid) in a container.
  • Mass indicates the amount of matter in an object and can be represented with different sized units.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.3.19.1: Define liquid volume, mass, grams, kilograms, and liters.
M.3.19.2: Recognize how the standard units of measure compare to one another.
M.3.19.3: Identify key terms for word problems.
M.3.19.4: Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps.
M.3.19.5: Recall basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts.
M.3.19.6: Describe measurable attributes of objects such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Measure objects using standard units.
  • Recall single-digit subtraction facts.
  • Recall single-digit addition facts.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.3.19 Identify the appropriate measurement tool to measure liquids and masses of a given object.


Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will be able to identify air, water, soil, and light as four needs of plants. Students will learn how to care for plants. They will analyze how roots, stems, and leaves help plants survive. Students will also learn the importance of observation, comparison and record keeping.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

31 to 60 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

1/2 pint milk cartons from school lunches; bean, radish, or corn seeds; potting soil mixture; markers; rulers; graphs; overhead projector with transparencies showing parts of seed and plant

Technology Resources Needed:

Desirable but not essential: Explorapedia - Nature CD-ROM, Computer with Internet access

Background/Preparation:

Plants require sunlight, water, soil, and air in order to grow and be healthy. Energy received from the sun is used to convert carbon dioxide and water into food. When plants do not receive the things they need to live and grow, they will either die or be stunted in their growth.

Save the 1/2 pint milk cartons from the students' lunches, rinse them out, and cut the tops off. Also, use fast growing seeds such as radish, corn or bean seeds.

  Procedures/Activities: 
1.)Gather enough 1/2 pint milk cartons from the cafeteria for the class.

2.)Cut the tops off the milk cartons.

3.)Fill the cartons with a soil mixture.

4.)Choose seeds that sprout fast, such as radish, bean or corn.

5.)Plant the seeds in the milk cartons. Dampen the soil.

6.)After the seedlings sprout, divide them into four different groups.

7.)Subject them to different growing conditions.

8.)Condition #1. Plant has soil, water, and air, but does not have light. Put these plants under a box or in the closet.

9.)Condition #2 - Plant has soil, light, and water but no air. Seal these plants in a large clear plastic bag.

10.)Condition #3 - Plant has soil, light, and air but no water. Do not water these plants.

11.)Condition #4 - This is the control group. Students will be familiar with this term. The plants have soil, air, light, and water.

12.)When the seedlings come through the soil, measure each week how much the plants have grown in each environmental condition.

13.)Record each on a separate graph.

14.)After several weeks, compare the graphs. Are there differences in rate of growth of the different plants in the separate conditions?

15.)This website is a good source of information on plants for students.
(ThinkQuest: Plants and Our Environment)
This site was created by a group of fourth grade students and contains easy to understand information about seeds, germination, pollination, and photosynthesis.

  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Teacher observation; oral questioning
Discuss with the students what each plant needs in order to grow. Have the students explain in writing what the plants look like in each of the conditions and what need was lacking in each one. Students will also measure and record the growth of each plant by using a graph.

Acceleration:

The students may decorate the sides of the milk cartons with paper, yarn, etc. and use them as pots for their plants. Students will also complete a graphic organizer showing the needs of plants. They may also create a flower out of construction paper and label the different parts - seed, roots, stem, leaves.

Intervention:

Teacher assisted with peer helper. Student may draw picture of seedling as it germinates in plant journal.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.