ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Digital Story Writing: Cultural Myths

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Shenitra Dees
System: Montgomery County
School: Jefferson Davis High School
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 30065

Title:

Digital Story Writing: Cultural Myths

Overview/Annotation:

You are a folklorist observing the lives and cultures of different people. You want to tell the world about  their culture, beliefs, and values. You and a group of other folklorist are going to research the lives of a an ethnic group, and create a digital story about their lives, and present it to all the folklorist at the "Who are They?" convention.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
TC2 (9-12) Computer Applications
6. Utilize advanced features of multimedia software, including image, video, and audio editing.
TC2 (9-12) Computer Applications
9. Practice ethical and legal use of technology systems and digital content.
  • Explaining consequences of illegal and unethical use of technology systems and digital content
  • Examples: cyberbullying, plagiarism
  • Interpreting copyright laws and policies with regard to ownership and use of digital content
  • Citing sources of digital content using a style manual
  • Examples: Modern Language Association (MLA), American Psychological Association (APA)
    TC2 (9-12) Computer Applications
    12. Use digital tools to publish curriculum-related content.
    Examples: Web page authoring software, coding software, wikis, blogs, podcasts
    ELA2015 (9)
    5. Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. [RL.9-10.5]
    ELA2015 (9)
    20. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. [W.9-10.1]
    a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. [W.9-10.1a]
    b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns. [W.9-10.1b]
    c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. [W.9-10.1c]
    d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.9-10.1d]
    e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. [W.9-10.1e]
    ELA2015 (9)
    21. Write informative or explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. [W.9-10.2]
    a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.9-10.2a]
    b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic. [W.9-10.2b]
    c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. [W.9-10.2c]
    d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. [W.9-10.2d]
    e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.9-10.2e]
    f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). [W.9-10.2f]
    ELA2015 (9)
    28. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. [W.9-10.9]
    a. Apply Grade 9 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]"). [W.9-10.9a]
    b. Apply Grade 9 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning"). [W.9-10.9b]
    ELA2015 (9)
    30. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 9 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. [SL.9-10.1]
    a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. [SL.9-10.1a]
    b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. [SL.9-10.1b]
    c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. [SL.9-10.1c]
    d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented. [SL.9-10.1d]
    ELA2015 (9)
    31. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally), evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source. [SL.9-10.2]
    ELA2015 (9)
    33. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task. [SL.9-10.4]
    ELA2015 (10)
    21. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. [W.9-10.1]
    a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. [W.9-10.1a]
    b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns. [W.9-10.1b]
    c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. [W.9-10.1c]
    d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.9-10.1d]
    e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. [W.9-10.1e]
    ELA2015 (10)
    22. Write informative or explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. [W.9-10.2]
    a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.9-10.2a]
    b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic. [W.9-10.2b]
    c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. [W.9-10.2c]
    d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. [W.9-10.2d]
    e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.9-10.2e]
    f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). [W.9-10.2f]
    ELA2015 (10)
    23. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.9-10.3]
    a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. [W.9-10.3a]
    b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.9-10.3b]
    c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole. [W.9-10.3c]
    d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. [W.9-10.3d]
    e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. [W.9-10.3e]
    ELA2015 (11)
    19. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. [W.11-12.1]
    a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. [W.11-12.1a]
    b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. [W.11-12.1b]
    c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. [W.11-12.1c]
    d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.11-12.1d]
    e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. [W.11-12.1e]
    ELA2015 (11)
    20. Write informative or explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. [W.11-12.2]
    a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.11-12.2a]
    b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic. [W.11-12.2b]
    c. Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. [W.11-12.2c]
    d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic. [W.11-12.2d]
    e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.11-12.2e]
    f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). [W.11-12.2f]
    ELA2015 (11)
    21. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.11-12.3]
    a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. [W.11-12.3a]
    b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.11-12.3b]
    c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution). [W.11-12.3c]
    d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. [W.11-12.3d]
    e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. [W.11-12.3e]

    Local/National Standards:

    2. Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.
    3.Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

    1. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
    2. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
    3. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.
    4. Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.
    5. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
    6. Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.
    7. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
    8. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

    Primary Learning Objective(s):

    Students will understand why narratives or narrative writing is important in different cultures.

    Students will understand the role of narratives in the oral tradition of different cultures.

    Students will how technology and the Internet can keep the oral traditions of many cultures alive.

    Students will understand how they can use technology to keep their families' histories and oral traditions alive.

    Additional Learning Objective(s):

     
     Preparation Information 

    Total Duration:

    Greater than 120 Minutes

    Materials and Resources:

    Copies of storyboard

    Copies Digital Story Checklist

    Copies Digital Story Rubric

    Copies Narrative Rubric

    Copies of Self&Peer Evaluation

    Print or digital copy of the Yoruba Creation Myth (downloaded from http://mythicjourneys.org/bigmyth/2_eng_myths.htm)

    Sample myth: http://mythicjourneys.org/bigmyth/2_eng_myths.htm

    Sample Digital Story: Pralines by Carol Burch Brown www.storycenter.org/stories/

    Copyright friendly sites: www.pics4learning.com, www.microsoft.com, http://copyrightfriendly.wikispaces.com/

     Search Engines:

    www.google.com

    www.msn.com

    www.bing.com

    www.infoplease.com

     

     

    Technology Resources Needed:

    Internet-ready computers

    Multimedia software (PowerPoint, MovieMaker, iMovie, PhotoStory) installed on the computers

    Word processing software installed on the computers

    Flash drives

    Computer Microphones

    Compute Headphones

    Computer speakers

    LCD projector

     

    Background/Preparation:

    The teacher and students should have already reviewed the structure of a short story. If he or she has not, they must first do this before proceeding.

    Teachers should preview the websites, storytelling, PowerPoint, steps to creating a digital story for MovieMaker and PowerPoint prior to the lesson.

    Both teacher and students should have basic knowledge of how to operate a computer and how to create a basic PowerPoint.  MovieMaker may be new to the teacher and/or some students. Students should select the format that they are most comfortable with.

      Procedures/Activities: 

    Day 1

    Opening Question: What are some of the stories that have been passed down in your family? Allow students to share their thoughts on the subject (Five to ten minutes). After asking this question ask, How important is it that we keep these stories alive?

    Transition: Tell students that these types of stories are known as oral traditions. An oral tradition is a message or story that is passed on from generation to generation by a story teller such as the African griot (storyteller). Other storytellers can be community elders such as your grandmother, great uncle, etc. Tell students that a type of oral tradition is the telling of myths.

    Share with them that although some stories may be true, other stories may be myths. A myth is a story that tries to explain the relationship between man and nature or try to explain the way the world is.

    Activity: Tell them that they will watch a myth. At the end of the myth they will respond to the questions on the vocabulary worksheet.

    Before viewing the myth, review the vocabulary for the elements of a myth. If students have any questions after reviewing the vocabulary, have them define the terms in their own words or provide them with other examples for the word meanings.

    If you are not already connected to the Internet, connect to the Internet and project this website http://mythicjourneys.org/bigmyth/2_eng_mythsa.htm You can select the continent of African and the Yoruba myth or another continent and myth depending on what the students want. Play the myth for students. As they watch the myth, tell them to record their answers on their vocabulary worksheet. Replay the myth again if students need it.

    Review the answers with the class, and address any student questions.

    Activity: Class Reading, "How the World was Made" a Cherokee myth. You can use the digital copy and direct students to the site or it can be found in the Glencoe Reader's Choice: American Literature Beginning-1900.  Tell students that they will use the vocabulary worksheet to answer questions about the myth. Give students another copy of the worksheet to turn in at the end of the lesson.

    Read part of the selection aloud with the class. Help the students answer one or two of the questions on the worksheet. Students are to complete the worksheets on their own.  Review students answers to the myth and collect the papers.

    If time runs out, they may finish the selection at home if they have web access or the text, or they can finish on the next day. 

    Day 2

    Opening activity: Graffiti wall. Post a colorful piece of chart paper/white paper on the door to your classroom with this question written in large writing.

    Question, "How has this reading and seeing the myths changed or enhanced your understanding of the Yoruba and Cherokee cultures? Students should respond to the question as they come in to class, or they can place their books down and respond. Review students responses with the class and ask questions or allow students to elaborate if they wish.

    Transition: Tell students that will be working in groups to research an ethnic group of the group's choice and research facts concerning their culture.  Tell them they the will work in groups of five to research, write, and create a digital story for the ethnic group they have selected.

    After assigning groups, give each a Cultural Research documentation sheet (This worksheet will can count as a test grade or quiz grade.). Tell the students that they will search for answers to the questions. Review the directions and sheet with the class. If they are not familiar with MLA style documentation, you may use their reference section in their textbooks or go to www.mla.org for guidance.

    This may take one to two classes periods or more if students are not able to work together beyond the class period.  After they have completed, the research. Tell the groups to complete the brainstorming sheet using the factual information (This sheet  can also count as a test or quiz grade.)  Tell them that the brainstorming sheet is the foundation for creating the narrative.

    As they work in groups, make sure to monitor what they are doing and provide input as needed. You can have them make copies of the brainstorming sheet for them to keep as they work. Review the tasks and answer any questions that they may have.

    If students are able to work beyond the class, encourage them to continue working.

    Day 3

    If students have completed the brainstorming sheet and are ready to begin the drafting process of creating their myths. Give them a copy or have them pull up the digital copy of the Yoruba Creation myth and a story map. Read the myth as a class, and have the students to identify the elements of the myth using a story map. Review the answers as a class, and tell the groups that they can use the myth as a model for their creations.

    Give them another copy of the story map and tell them use the brainstorming sheet to help begin drafting their story. Give the the rubric and checklist for drafting their myths. Review the checklist and rubric with the class. If class computers or a computer lab is available, they may begin typing their drafts in Word and save them on their class flash drives, or they may write them. Allow them 20-30 minutes to draft, and then bring the class together to discuss any issues or questions concerning their stories. After the discussion, allow them to continue to draft their stories.

    Students should have a complete draft by them end of the class period. If not, allow them time to complete their drafts on the next class meeting.

    Day 4

    Original drafts due at the beginning of the period or block.  They should be printed or emailed to the teacher.

    Address any questions or concerns that students may have. If all drafts are complete, hand each group a peer editing sheet. Tell the class that their drafts will be edited by two different groups within the class. Review the editing sheets with the class and answer any questions or concerns that the students may have.

    Allow 20 minutes for each editing session . If students have printed their drafts, attach editing sheets to the the draft. If drafts are digital, they may use the comment or tracking application and save the document. If students are not familiar with the comment or tracking application, use the tutorial to show them or demonstrate how it is done.

    At the end of the peer editing session, save the changes to the drafts or staple worksheets the printed draft and hand them back to the groups. Electronic peer edits should be emailed to the teacher.

    Next, review the rubric and checklist with the class and allow groups to complete their final drafts. If students have access to computers and printers at home, they should have final drafts completed by the next class meeting.

    Day 5

    Final drafts of the written narrative are due.

    Introduction to digital storytelling:  Open the class by selecting a digital story or from one of the websites from the resources selection. After viewing the  selection ask students these questions:

    What do you notice about the story(ies)?

    What senses do they appeal too?

    How did they keep your attention?

    Allow students to respond the questions.

    Transition: Tell students that the selection is an example of a digital story. Explain to the groups that they will be creating digital stories of their myths.

    Use the PowerPoint presentation on storytelling to lead a discusson on the elements of digital storytelling. You can either have them take notes or print handouts of the presentation. Address any questions that the students may have.

    Next, hand each group copies of the digital story rubric and the digital story storyboard. Tell the groups that they will use the myths and the storyboard to plan their digital stories.

    Allow students time to begin working on their storyboards. Have extra copies available if they need them. Monitor the activities and be available to answer any questions.  If they need to see other examples of digital myths, direct them to http://mythicjourneys.org.

    Their storyboards should be complete by the end of the class period. If they are not, allow them time to complete it on the next class meeting. Remind students that all student voices should be heard in the story, and be sure to delegate speaking parts.

    Day 6

    Mini Quiz:

    Allow students 10 minutes to complete the quiz. Review the answers in class (Included in resources). Reveiw the elements if need be.

    Next, tell students that they will use their storyboards to create their digital stories using either PowerPoint or MovieMaker. You can either give students a printed copy of each tutorial or upload a digital copy.

    Review each tutorial with students in class. You will need the computer microphones and headphones. I suggest that you play with the each program and  create a short clip before presenting to the class. Allow one or two students to practice as a class.

    Note, the microphones will pick up background noise. If students can not create their stories at home than, the will have to find other places such as the school library or an empty classroom to record narration.

    This may take one to two days or more.

    Day 7 and 8

    These days may be dedicated to students finishing the final products.

    Day 9 and 10

    Presentation Days: If you are able too, set the classroom up as a convention. Create name plates for the countries that will be represented for the digital stories. Use the digital story rubrics and begin presentations.

    At the end of each group presentation, give the group a copy of the peer and self evaluation. This will allow other groups some time to set up. Collect the peer evaluations before the next presentation begins.

    Closing Assignment: In the journals, have students write about their experiences working in groups and creating myths and digital stories. If students wish, they may share their thoughts with the class.



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      Assessment  

    Assessment Strategies

    Students will be assessed using three major rubrics.

    StoryWritingCulturalMyths-Narrative

    Rubric for Digital Stories

    Peer Evaluations

    Total assessment depends upon the teacher. Teachers may assign percentages to each component or average the scores of each component to determine the final grade.

    Things that need to be handed in for informal assessments are:

    The Digital Storyboard

    The Rough Draft

    Cultural Research and Brainstorming Sheet

    Acceleration:

    Students may publish their digital stories to their school's website or ALEX.

    Students may search for members of the ethnic community and share their stories to determine content accuracy.

    Intervention:

     

    Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

    Presentation of Material Environment
    Time Demands Materials
    Attention Using Groups and Peers
    Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior
    Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.