ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Lucky Charms colors and shapes

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Angela Hargett
System: Lanett City
School: Lanett City Board Of Education
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 32785

Title:

Lucky Charms colors and shapes

Overview/Annotation:

Students will complete a hands-on activity by sorting, estimating, counting, and graphing data. Students will sort the Lucky Charms by color and/shape. Students will interpret the data and create a graph.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: K
3. Write numerals from 0 to 20.

a. Represent 0 to 20 using concrete objects when given a written numeral from 0 to 20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects). 
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Write numerals correctly from 0 to 20.
  • Represent numbers using concrete objects when given a written numeral from 0 to 20.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Numeral
  • Number
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to match numeral name with sets of objects.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • write numerals from 0 to 20.
  • Represent numbers from 0 to 20.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a written numeral represents a number of objects.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.K.3.1: Write numbers 0 to 10.
M.K.3.2: Match numerals to quantity 11 to 20.
M.K.3.3: Match numerals to quantity 0 to 10.
M.K.3.4: Recognize written numerals 0 to 20.
M.K.3.5: Demonstrate one to one correspondence for a group of objects 6 to 20.
M.K.3.6: Demonstrate one to one correspondence for a group of objects 0 to 5.
M.K.3.7: Trace numerals 0 to 20.
M.K.3.8: Make purposeful marks such as lines and circles.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Count to 20 and above.
  • Mimic counting by ones.
  • Recognize numbers from one to ten.
  • Become interested in how many objects she/he has.
  • Continue to have an interest in counting.
  • Understand the concept of size and amount.
  • Notice same/different and some/all.
  • Understand that words can label sameness and differences.
  • Understand that some have more, and some have less.
  • Become more interested in the concept of some and all.
  • Make purposeful marks.
  • Given a set number of objects one through ten, answer the question "How many?"
  • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many."
  • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture, a drawing or objects.
  • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group (up to ten objects).
  • Count objects one-by-one using only one number per object (up to ten objects).
  • Recognize that numbers and numerals have meaning.
  • Recognize numerals 0 (zero) through 10.
  • Identify the difference between written numbers and other written things.
  • Identify the difference between written numbers and objects.
  • Rote count to ten.
  • Communicate some number words.
  • Recognize after.
  • Recognize before.
  • Enjoy playing with all kinds of objects.
  • Point to matching or similar objects.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.K.1 Using vocalization, sign language, augmentative communication, or assistive technology, count to 15 by ones starting with one.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: K
6. Orally identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater/more than, less/fewer than, or equal/the same as the number of objects in another group, in groups containing up to 10 objects, by using matching, counting, or other strategies.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain and justify answers to questions such as "which group has more?" or "which group has less?".
  • Answer questions such as which group has more or less by matching, recognizing without counting (subitizing), or counting up to 10 objects.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Compare
  • Greater than
  • More than
  • Less than
  • Fewer than
  • Equal
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to identify which number is larger and which number is smaller.
  • number word sequence.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Count sequentially.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a set of objects is either greater than, less than, or equal to another set of objects.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.K.6.1: Define greater than, less than, and equal to.
M.K.6.2: Count to 20 by ones.
M.K.6.3: Count objects up to ten.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Understand amount words, such as more, less, and another.
  • Begin to understand that parts of an object can make a whole.
  • Become more interested in the concept of some and all.
  • Be interested in who has more or less.
  • Understand the concept of "less than".
  • Mimic counting by ones.
  • Recognize numbers from one to ten.
  • Become interested in how many objects she/he has.
  • Understand the concept of size and amount.
  • Given a set number of objects one through ten, answer the question "how many?"
  • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many."
  • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture, a drawing or objects.
  • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group.
  • Count objects one-by-one using only one number per object.
  • Recognize that numbers and numerals have meaning.
  • Recognize numerals 0 through 10.
  • Rote count to ten.
  • Communicate number words.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.K.6 Identify whether the number of objects in one group is more or less than (e.g., when the quantities are clearly different) or equal to the number of objects in another group.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: K
15. Classify objects into given categories of 10 or fewer; count the number of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

a. Categorize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
Given a group of objects,
  • sort the objects into categories (no more than ten objects in any category).
  • Count the number of objects in each category.
  • Order the categories by count.
  • Justify their reasoning.
  • Discuss information conveyed in analyzing graphs.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Classify
  • Venn diagrams
  • Pictographs
  • Yes/no charts
  • Bar graphs
  • Symbolic representations
  • Pictorial representations
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to count.
  • Sort objects.
  • Category descriptors (e.g. triangles, rectangles, round, curved sides, color, etc).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • sort objects.
  • Effectively use strategies to count groups of objects.
  • Read and understand graphs.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • objects can be grouped into categories based on like characteristics.
  • They can gain information from graphs.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.K.15.1: Identify more and less when given two groups of objects.
M.K.15.2: Identify object attributes.
Examples: color, shape, size, texture, use.
M.K.15.3: Count objects up to ten.
M.K.15.4: Count to 10 by ones.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Participate in creating charts or graphs to represent data collection.
  • Notice same/different and some/all.
  • Recognize numbers from one to ten.
  • Given a group of objects (ten or less), divide the group into smaller groups in various ways.
  • Given small groups of objects, create larger groups by combining the small groups.
  • Take away objects from a large group to create two smaller groups.
  • Put together two small groups of objects to create a larger group.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture a drawing or objects.
  • Rote count to ten.
  • Begin to name and match colors, sizes, and shapes.
  • Enjoy playing with all kinds of objects.
  • Point to matching or similar objects.
  • Understand that words can label sameness and differences.
  • Understand that some have more, and some have less.
  • Sort objects based on shape or color.
  • Name and match primary colors.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.K.15 Explore a simple pictograph (limited to two categories and limit a combined quantity of 5 for both categories).


Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

  • Students will classify and count objects by color.
  • Students will classify and count objects by shape.
  • Students will complete graph to count objects that have been classified into categories.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

  • The students will be able to see the graph projected on a LCD projector.
  • The students will be able to identify vocabulary words such as graph, category and classify.
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

61 to 90 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

  •  1/2 cup Lucky Charms Cereal
  • zip-lock bags
  • Book Hippo and Fox Sort Socks by Amar Ganeesh
  • Lucky Charms paper
  • pencils

Technology Resources Needed:

  • Computer with internet access
  • LCD Projector

  • PowerPoint software

  • Microsoft Word

Background/Preparation:

The teacher should prepare Lucky Charms Cereal into zip-lock bags approximately 1/2 per bag.  The teacher needs to make enough for each student.  The teacher should prepare all work pages ahead of time.  The page should be available to project with the LCD projector.

Students should already have knowledge of counting, sorting, colors and numbers.

  Procedures/Activities: 
  1. To activate prior knowledge, I would read Hippo and Fox Sort Socks by Amar Ganeesh.  During and after reading, we would discuss the story. The book is about sorting and classifying socks in different categories. If needed,review the vocabulary word sort and categories.
  2. Students will sort and count various objects that were placed in containers. Students can classify the objects by shapes and/or colors. If needed, color words can be reviewed.
  3. As a whole group, we will count the objects on the PowerPoint presentation. The students will sort objects as well.
  4. After we completing the activities on the carpet the students will go to their desk.
  5. The students will be given their bag of Lucky Charms cereal to observe.
  6. The student will be given approximately 10 minutes to "guess or estimate" how many of each item is in the zip-lock bag.
  7. Then I will display on the board a sorting paper just like the students using a projector.  This will help us to do the activity together discussing each item.
  8. After the students have written down their estimate, they will have to count each item in the zip-lock bag.  They need to record all answers on their paper.
  9. After the students count all the items inside the bag, they need to put the total amount at the bottom of their paper.
  10. While the students are doing the activity the teacher will be circulating around the room making sure all students are on task.
  11. After all items have been counted and recorded on the sheet and discussed then the students may eat their Lucky Charms.


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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

The assessment for this lesson will be informal.  Students will sort the cereal by color and put how many of each on the sorting page provided.  Questions will be asked during the lesson to evaluate the students understanding of the activity.

Acceleration:

Students will use the data collected to determine if their guess was close to the correct answer.

As a center activity, students could visit http://www.abc.net.au/countusin/games/game1.htm to practice counting objects. This could also be used as a remediation tool.

Intervention:

Work in a small group to help those who have trouble sorting or counting.  Also try using manipulative's to help with sorting or counting.  Use different color bears, or linking cubes.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.