ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Those Sneaky Poets!!  

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Angie Harris
System: College/University
School: University of North Alabama
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 33372

Title:

Those Sneaky Poets!!

 

Overview/Annotation:

This lesson integrates the area of science and english language arts. Students will analyze figurative language in the poem A Drop Around the World by Barbara Shaw McKinney and work collaboratively to create a poster of the water cycle that demonstrates their knowledge of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation in the water cycle. Students will then individually produce a paragraph that demonstrates their knowledge of the water cycle using the key words evaporation, condensation and precipitation.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 2
12 ) Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. [RI.2.3]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.2.12- Identify events or steps in a historical, scientific, or technical text.


English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 2
R4. Use digital and electronic tools appropriately, safely, and ethically for research and writing, both individually and collaboratively.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R4.
  • Digital tools
  • Electronic tools
  • Appropriately
  • Safely
  • Ethically
  • Research
  • Individually
  • Collaboratively
Knowledge:
R4. Students know:
  • Digital and electronic tools must be used appropriately, safely, and ethically.
  • Digital and electronic tools can be used for research or for writing tasks.
  • Digital and electronic tools can be independently or with others.
Skills:
R4. Students are able to:
  • Engage in safe and ethical behavior when using digital and electronic tools individually and collaboratively.
Understanding:
R4. Students understand that:
  • Safe behaviors, interactions that keep you out of harm's way, are necessary when using digital and electronic tools.
  • Ethical behavior, interactions that align to one's moral code, are necessary when using digital and electronic tools.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 2
4. Orally answer who, what, when, where, why, and how questions about a text or conversation, using complete sentences to provide key ideas and details.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
4.
  • Orally
  • Who, what, when where, why, and how questions
  • Complete sentences
  • Key ideas
  • Key details
Knowledge:
4. Students know:
  • Key ideas and details should be included when answering questions.
  • Complete sentences, which contain a subject and a predicate, should be used when answering questions.
  • Who, when, and where questions will have a concrete, objective answer.
  • What, why, and how questions may have a more abstract, subjective answer.
Skills:
4. Students are able to:
  • Orally answer questions about a text or conversation using complete sentences that provide information about key ideas and details.
  • Orally answer who, what, when, where, why, and how questions about a text or conversation with appropriate key ideas and details.
Understanding:
4. Students understand that:
  • When answering who, what, when, where, why, and how questions they should provide key ideas and details from a text or conversation to demonstrate their comprehension.
  • Speaking in complete sentences helps them clearly communicate their message and their understanding.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 2
13. Read grade-appropriate poetry, noticing phrasing, rhythm, and rhyme.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Fluency
Teacher Vocabulary:
13.
  • Grade-appropriate poetry
  • Phrasing
  • Rhythm
  • Rhyme
Knowledge:
13. Students know:
  • The features of poetry include phrasing, rhythm, and rhyme.
  • Words rhyme if their vowel and ending sounds are the same (example: ham, Sam).
  • Rhythm is a steady beat made by stressed syllables in spoken words.
  • A phrase is a group of words.
Skills:
13. Students are able to:
  • Read grade-appropriate poetry.
  • Notice the features of poetry, including words that rhyme, stressed syllables that create rhythm, and words that are grouped together in phrases.
Understanding:
13.
  • Poetry is a genre of text that uses distinctive style and rhythm to aid in the expression of feelings.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 2
20. Use grade-level academic and domain-specific vocabulary to gain meaning from text.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Vocabulary
Teacher Vocabulary:
20.
  • Academic vocabulary
  • Domain-specific vocabulary
Knowledge:
20. Students know:
  • Academic vocabulary is language that is more formal than spoken language.
  • Domain-specific vocabulary refers to words that are used specifically in school subject areas, like math, science, and social studies.
  • Vocabulary knowledge can be used to comprehend text.
Skills:
20. Students are able to:
  • Use knowledge of second grade-level academic and domain-specific vocabulary words to accurately comprehend text.
Understanding:
20. Students understand that:
  • Learning the meaning of academic, domain-specific vocabulary words will help them comprehend text in a variety of subject areas.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 2
32. Identify rhyme schemes in poems or songs.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
32.
  • Rhyme schemes
  • Poems
  • Songs
Knowledge:
32. Students know:
  • Rhyme schemes are patterns of sound that repeat at the end of a line or stanza in a poem or song.
Skills:
32. Students are able to:
  • Identify rhyming words in poems or songs.
  • Identify the pattern of sounds that repeat at the end of a line or stanza in poems or songs.
Understanding:
32. Students understand that:
  • Rhyming words have the same vowel and ending sound.
  • Poems and songs often have a pattern of rhyming words, called a rhyme scheme.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 2
41. Write informative or explanatory texts, introducing the topic, providing facts and relevant details to develop points, and providing a conclusion.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
41.
  • Informative text
  • Explanatory text
  • Topic
  • Facts
  • Relevant details
  • Develop
  • Points
  • Conclusion
Knowledge:
41. Students know:
  • Informative or explanatory text is a piece of writing that provides factual information.
  • Informative or explanatory text begins by introducing the topic, provides facts and relevant details, and ends with a conclusion.
Skills:
41. Students are able to:
  • Write an informative or explanatory text.
  • Write an informative or explanatory text that begins with introducing the topic, provides facts and details about the topic, and ends with a conclusion.
Understanding:
41. Students understand that:
  • Informative or explanatory writing follows a predictable text structure that includes introducing the topic, providing facts or additional details about the topic, and ends with a conclusion.
  • Informative or explanatory writing can be used to tell facts about a topic.

Local/National Standards:

CCRS, SL.2.2 Main ideas of speaker and multimedia information

CCRS, SL2.1 Collaborative conversations

CCRS, RL.2.4 Describe, tell and report orally

CCRS, RL.2.5 Visual and oral presentations

CCRS, L.2.1 Grammar, usage

CCRS, L.2.2 Capitalization, punctuation, spelling

CCRS, L.2.5 Word relationships and nuances, figurative language

CCRS, L.2.6 Academic and domain-specific words and phrases

CCRS, W.2.2 Informative/Explanatory texts

CCRS, W.2.6 Use of technology

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

-What are the steps in the water cycle? (Remember)

-How can I use evidence from the text to explain how the author uses figurative language to show the steps in the water cycle? (Explain)

-How can I use evidence from the text to decide why the author chooses to use rhyming text when writing about the water cycle? (Evaluate)

-Can I use what the author tells me in a figurative manner to create a way to display the water cycle in an artistic manner? (Create)

-Can I interpret and explain what a poet means when he is writing an informational poem? (Understand)

 

Additional Learning Objective(s):

  • How can I use a word processing program to produce a paragraph to demonstrate my learning about the steps in the water cycle? (Understand)
  • How can I use my speaking and listening skills to ask and answer questions about the water cycle? (Apply)
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

61 to 90 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

Copies of the illustrated poem A Drop Around the World by Barbara Shaw McKinney (enough for groups of three students to share, either electronic or paper copies), chart paper, chart markers or paint, access to word processing software.

 

Technology Resources Needed:

  • iPads with Kindle app if using electronic copies of the poem 
  • iPads with the following apps downloaded:

-The Water Cycle app- available from Classroom Complete Press. 

-The Water Cycle HD app - available from Sprout Labs, LLC for a charge of $1.99. 

-The tale of a Snowflake is an interactive story from AppTalia available for a charge of $1.99.

  • Internet access
  • Interactive whiteboard
  • Word processing program (if desired)

Background/Preparation:

Students will need to review their knowledge of the water cycle before teaching the lesson. Students need to understand that nonfiction text gives information, and even though poetry is entertaining, an author may choose to use poetry to inform in order to “capture” his reader.

 

  Procedures/Activities: 

Lesson Opener - To begin the lesson, the teacher will use the interactive whiteboard to allow students to review vocabulary and the steps in the water cycle in small groups. The South East Water for You interactive website will be used. It can be found at this link: http://apps.southeastwater.com.au/games/se-water-cycle.swf.

The teacher will then state poets are some of the sneakiest people she knows! She will say that poets are usually trying to entertain us, but sometimes they sneak some learning in on us. They use rhyming words when they write to hook the reader into reading more and more. She will promise to help them ask and answer questions about what Barbara Shaw McKinney is trying to sneakily teach them. The teacher will remind students that the water cycle is a set pattern in nature. Water condenses, falls as precipitation, and evaporates over and over.

During the Lesson:

-Students will listen to the teacher read the entire poem fluently and expressively one time.

-The teacher will ask students to focus on the first two pages of the poem as she rereads slowly and carefully:

Nestled in a cloud near Maine, (page one)

little droplet longs to rain,

Though not yet big enough to fall,

it waits with others, still too small.

 

Then adventure starts to blow...

on wings of wind, it’s off they go.

Sailing in the ocean cloud,

moisture feeds “the droplet crowd.”

 

The journey leads to southern Spain.       (page two)

Drop has grown; it’s time to rain.

It falls on the cape of a matador

who fights a charging bull once more.

 

But luckily, when red is waved,

drop is shaken off and saved. 

It quickly sizzles in the heat,

evaporating in retreat!

 

-The teacher will lead students in asking and answering the following questions about unknown words in the poem. 

  • “What does the word nestled mean? Are there clues around the word nestled? If the droplet is waiting with others, could that be a clue? How have you felt when you were bunched up with a lot of people waiting on something big to happen?”
  • “What about the word matador?” What is a big ‘right there’ clue about what a matador does? Does the illustration give you a hint about what a matador might be?”

-Students will examine the rhyming pattern of the poem by supplying words the teacher leaves out in the second reading of the poem.

-The teacher will encourage students to ask and discuss questions about key details and figurative language in the poem as a whole group and by using quick “turn and talks.” Teacher will direct the discussion as students ask and answer the following questions:

  • “Have you noticed that the author describes the little water droplet as “longing” to rain? Isn’t that something people usually do? Is the author trying to make us think of the droplet as a person? When the author describes something that is not a person, but uses qualities of a person, it is called personification. Can you say that word with me?”
  • “What does the author mean when she says ‘when the red is waved” the water droplet is “saved”? Does the picture give you a clue?”
  • The author says that the wind has “wings”? Do you think the wind actually has wings? What is the author comparing the wind to? (Bird) When an author compares one thing to something else, but doesn’t use the words ‘like' or 'as' he is using a literary device called a ‘metaphor.' Can you say that word with me?"

-The teacher will draw attention to how the author uses personification to describe steps in the water cycle.

  • When the author says that the water droplets are nestled together, and describes them as a “droplet crowd” which part of the water cycle is she describing? (Condensation)
  • When the author says that the droplets have grown large enough to fall, which part of the water cycle is she describing? (Precipitation)
  • When the author says that the droplet sizzles in the heat and goes away, what part of the water cycle is the author describing? (Evaporation)

-Students will be dismissed to use classroom computers and iPads to review the vocabulary and steps of the water cycle. The following program and apps will be utilized for review:

-Students will use classroom computers to review vocabulary and the steps in the water cycle. It is from the EPA.gov website. It can be found at the following link.

http://www.epa.gov/ogwdw/kids/flash/flash_watercycle.html 

-Students will use the classroom iPads to play the game, The Water Cycle. The free app is available from Classroom Complete Press. The Water Cycle HD is available from Sprout Labs, LLC for a charge of $1.99. The tale of a Snowflake is an interactive story rom AppTalia available for a charge of $1.99.

-Students will next break into groups of three to illustrate phrases from the poem that demonstrate the steps in the water cycle. She will remind the students they may use personification or metaphors to illustrate their posters. The content vocabulary words will be written on the white board to aid students in spelling them correctly: evaporation, condensation, and precipitation. The teacher will walk around and listen to discussions as students work in order to remediate as necessary.

-Students will write a paragraph demonstrating their knowledge of the water cycle and using the key vocabulary of the process; evaporation, condensation, and precipitation. The teacher will remind them that they may use personification or metaphors to write their paragraphs.



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

The following rubric will be used to assess written paragraphs:

Paragraph Writing Rubric - Informational Writing


(See above attachment)

Acceleration:

The lesson may be extended by allowing students to choose other informational poetry relating to the study of science, or elaborating on the paragraph writing.

Intervention:

For students who struggle, peer tutoring my be utilized, or struggling students may work in a small group with the teacher. Smaller portions of the poem may also be presented in isolation.

Students who are having difficulty working in a small group will be given the opportunity to do their illustration using Conceptdraw.com to illustrate the water cycle. This program will allow them to digitally illustrate the water cycle.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.