ALEX Lesson Plan

     

The Three Little Pigs vs. The Wolf

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Alyssa Mathews
System: College/University
School: University of North Alabama
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 33388

Title:

The Three Little Pigs vs. The Wolf

Overview/Annotation:

In this lesson, students will listen to "The Three Little Pigs" and "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs". They will identify who is telling the two stories. Students will identify the narrator, characters, setting, problem, and solution in both stories. They will then compare and contrast the "The Three Little Pigs" and "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" using a Venn Diagram. Students will decide which narrator is most believable and collect student data. Students will use iPads to create a bar graph with the class opinion data. 

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 1
16. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories.

a. Ask and answer questions about the total number of data points in organized data.

b. Summarize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.

c. Determine "how many" in each category using up to three categories of data.

d. Determine "how many more" or "how many less" are in one category than in another using data organized into two or three categories.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • will create a table or chart to organize and represent data with up to three categories using physical objects, tally mark graphs, pictographs, Venn diagrams, yes/no charts, or bar graphs.
  • analyze and interpret the data verbally and in writing by asking and answering questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, or how many more or less are in one category than in another.
  • use measurement vocabulary such as most, least, more than, less than, and similar comparison words.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Tally mark graphs
  • Pictographs
  • Venn diagrams
  • Yes/no charts
  • Bar graphs
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • objects can be grouped into categories based on like characteristics.
  • they can gain information from graphs.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create, analyze, and interpret data.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • questions concerning mathematical contexts can be answered by collecting and organizing data.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.16.1: Define more and less.
M.1.16.2: Describe methods for representing data.
Examples: pictographs, tally charts, bar graphs, and Venn Diagrams.
M.1.16.3: Locate information on data displays.
M.1.16.4: Classify objects into given categories; count the number of objects in each category, and sort the categories by count.
M.1.16.5: Recognize different types of data displays.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Identify more and less when given two groups of objects.
  • Identify object attributes.
    Examples: color, shape, size, texture, use.
  • Count objects up to ten.
  • Count to 10 by ones.
  • Understand a different types of graphs (ex. Venn diagram, bar graphs and pictograph).
  • Identify more and less when given two groups of objects of 10 or fewer.
  • Count objects up to 10.
  • Count to 10 by ones.
  • Understand categories.
  • Identify object attributes.
    Examples: color, shape, size, texture, purpose.
  • Count to 1-20.
  • Mimic counting by ones.
  • Recognize numerals from 0-20.
  • Understand the concept of amount.
  • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many?"
  • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
  • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group (up to ten objects).

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.16 Sort objects or pictures into common categories (e.g., shapes, pets, fruits; limited to two categories and a combined total of 15 objects/pictures for the categories).


English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 1
6. Demonstrate basic to advanced phonological and phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.

a. Count, blend, segment, and delete syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.

Examples: par-ti-cu-lar, cer-ti-fi-cate

b. Recognize and produce groups of rhyming words and distinguish them from non-rhyming groups of spoken words.

c. Produce alliterative words.

d. Blend and segment phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, including words with consonant blends.

e. Add, delete, and substitute phonemes at the beginning or end of spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, and produce the resulting word.

Examples: pan to pant; flight to light; cat to cap

f. Distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken, single-syllable words.

g. Distinguish between commonly-confused vowel sounds and commonly-confused cognate consonant sounds, using knowledge of mouth position, voiced and unvoiced sounds, and manner of articulation.

Examples: /f/ and /v/, /p/ and /b/, /t/ and /d/, /k/ and /g/, /m/ and /n/, /ng/ and /n/, /s/ and /z/, unvoiced /th/ and voiced /th/, /ch/ and /sh/, /ĕ/ and /ā/, /ĕ/ and /ă/

Note: This is extremely important as a foundational phonemic awareness skill for all learners.

h. Identify the sound substitution in words with five to six phonemes.

Example: strips/straps, square/squire
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Phonological Awareness/Phonemic Awareness
Teacher Vocabulary:
6.
  • Demonstrate
  • Phonological awareness skills
  • Phonemic awareness skills
  • Spoken words
6a.
  • Count
  • Blend
  • Segment
  • Delete
  • Syllables
  • Spoken words
  • Polysyllabic words
6b.
  • Recognize
  • Produce
  • Rhyming words
  • Distinguish
  • Non-rhyming
6c.
  • Alliterative
6d.
  • Blend
  • Segment
  • Phonemes
  • Single-syllable spoken words
  • Consonant blends
6e.
  • Add
  • Delete
  • Substitute
  • Phonemes
6f.
  • Vowel
  • Long Vowel Sound
  • Short Vowel Sound
  • Single-syllable spoken words
6g.
  • Distinguish
  • Vowel sounds
  • Cognate consonant sounds
  • Mouth position
  • Voiced sounds
  • Unvoiced sounds
  • Articulation
6h.
  • Substitution
  • Phonemes
Knowledge:
6. Students know:
  • Basic to advanced phonological and phonemic awareness skills.
6a.
  • Syllables in spoken words.
  • Polysyllabic words.
6b.
  • The features of rhyming words.
  • The features of non-rhyming words.
6c.
  • The features of alliterative words.
6d.
  • Phonemes in single-syllable spoken words.
  • Consonant blends.
6e.
  • Phonemes in single-syllable spoken words.
  • Phonemes in spoken words can be manipulated.
6f.
  • Long vowel sounds.
  • Short vowel sounds.
6g.
  • Vowel sounds.
  • Cognate consonant sounds.
  • The mouth position, voicing, and manner of articulation of speech sounds.
6h.
  • Sound substitution.
Skills:
6. Students are able to:
  • Demonstrate basic to advanced phonological and phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.
6a.
  • Count syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
  • Blend syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
  • Segment syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
  • Delete syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
6b.
  • Recognize groups of rhyming words.
  • Produce groups of rhyming words.
  • Distinguish groups of non-rhyming words from groups of rhyming words.
6c.
  • Produce alliterative words.
6d.
  • Blend phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, including words with consonant blends.
  • Segment phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, including words with consonant blends.
6e. Using spoken words made up of three to five phonemes,
  • Add phonemes at the beginning or end of a word and produce the resulting word, such as changing pan to pant.
  • Delete phonemes at the beginning or end of a word to produce the resulting word, such as changing flight to light.
  • Substitute phonemes at the beginning or end to produce the resulting word, such as changing cat to cap.
6f.
  • Identify long vowel sounds.
  • Identify short vowel sounds.
  • Distinguish between long and short vowel sounds in spoken words.
6g.
  • Using knowledge of mouth position, voiced and unvoiced sounds, and manner of articulation, distinguish between commonly-confused vowel sounds and cognate consonant sounds.
6h.
  • In words with five to six phonemes, identify sound substitutions, such as identifying the vowel sound changed in the word pair strips/straps.
Understanding:
6. Students understand that:
  • Being able to identify and manipulate the sounds in spoken words will help improve their reading, spelling, and writing abilities.
6a.
  • Being able to to identify and manipulate syllables in spoken words will help improve their reading, spelling, and writing abilities.
6b.
  • Words that rhyme have the same vowel and ending sound.
6c.
  • Alliterative words begin with the same sound.
6d.
  • Blending is the ability to hear the individual sounds in a spoken word, join the sounds together, and produce the word.
  • Segmenting is the ability to break words down into their individual sounds.
6e.
  • Adding, deleting, and substituting phonemes at the beginning or end of spoken words changes the resulting word.
6f.
  • One letter can make different sounds depending on its context.
  • When a letter makes the sound of its letter name, it is considered a long vowel.
  • When a letter makes a sound other than its name, it is considered a short vowel.
6g.
  • The knowledge of mouth position, voiced and unvoiced sounds, and manner of articulation is required for the proper pronunciation of words.
  • The ability to distinguish commonly-confused sounds will help them become better readers, spellers, and writers.
6h.
  • A word's meaning and pronunciation will be altered if one sound is changed.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 1
21. Identify the main topic and key details of literary and informational texts.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
21.
  • Identify
  • Main topic
  • Key details
  • Literary texts
  • Informational texts
Knowledge:
21. Students know:
  • Main topic of literary and informational texts.
  • Key details of literary and informational texts.
Skills:
21. Students are able to:
  • Identify the main topic of literary and informational texts.
  • Identify key details of literary and informational texts.
Understanding:
21. Students understand that:
  • Literary and informational texts have a main idea and supporting details.
English Language Arts
ELA2021 (2021)
Grade: 1
29. Compare and contrast texts.

a. Compare and contrast characters, settings, and major events in literary texts.

b. Describe the connections between individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in an informational text.

c. Point out similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
29.
  • Compare
  • Contrast
  • Texts
29a.
  • Compare
  • Contrast
  • Characters
  • Settings
  • Major events
  • Literary texts
29b.
  • Describe
  • Connections
  • Individuals
  • Events
  • Ideas
  • Pieces of information
  • Informational text
29c.
  • Similarities
  • Differences
  • Topic
Knowledge:
29. Students know:
  • Techniques to compare (similarities) and contrast (differences) two texts.
29a.
  • Characters.
  • Settings.
  • Major events.
  • Literary texts.
  • Techniques to compare and contrast story elements in literary texts.
29b.
  • There are often connections between individuals, events, ideas, or information in an informational text.
29c.
  • Techniques to compare and contrast features of two texts.
Skills:
29. Students are able to:
  • Identify the similarities and differences in the text.
29a.
  • Identify characters, settings, and major events in a literary text.
  • Compare (similarities) and contrast (differences) characters, settings, and major events in a literary text.
29b.
  • Identify and describe connections between individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in an informational text.
29c.
  • Identify the similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic.
Understanding:
29. Students understand that:
  • They can improve their comprehension of texts by identifying similarities and differences between two texts.
29a.
  • Comparing and contrasting characters, settings, and major events in a text helps them to better understand the meaning of the literary text.
29b.
  • Connections can be made between individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in informational text.
  • Connections describe how individuals, events, ideas, or information in informational text are similar or different.
29c.
  • They can improve their comprehension of a topic by comparing and contrasting two texts on the topic.

Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

The students will be able to identify who is telling a story at various points in a text by recognizing the characters and/or narrator of a story. 

Additional Learning Objective(s):

The students will be able to identify the characters, setting, problem, and solution in "The Three Little Pigs" and also "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs".  

The students will be able to compare and contrast the two stories.

The students will be able to analyze a Venn Diagram and decide which story ("The Three Little Pigs" or "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs") is the most believable. 

The students will collect data and create a class bar graph. 

 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

61 to 90 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

"The Three Little Pigs" by Judy Tenuta

"The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" by Jon Scieszka

Story Map, Venn Diagram sheet, white board

Technology Resources Needed:

Interactive whiteboard

Youtube- "The Three Little Pigs" read aloud, "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" read aloud

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gnhSAu15G8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m75aEhm-BYw

Story Elements video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6I24S72Jps

5 iPads

Create A Graph http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx?ID=69b617e88ec54b0680841c2a8709cc50

Background/Preparation:

The teacher will have previously introduced the concept of characters, narrator, setting, problem, and solutions in a story. Students need to have previously used a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast two items. Students may already be familiar with the story of "The Three Little Pigs".  Students should be familiar with iPads. 

  Procedures/Activities: 

10 minutes

1) In a whole group setting, the teacher will introduce the lesson's objectives. Explain to students to goal of the lesson and that by the end they should be able to identify who is telling a story at various times in a text.

2) Review as a whole group the definition of characters and narrator. Remind students that characters can be people or animals the story is about. The narrator is the person telling the story, sometimes a character, usually the author.

3) Review the elements of a short story by playing the Story Elements video.   Ask general questions after the video to decide if more review of short story elements is necessary before proceeding. 

20 minutes

4) Explain to students that they  will be identifying the story elements of two different stories. Their goal is to recognize who is telling the story in "The Three Little Pigs" and "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs".

5) Either read aloud these two stories or play the stories from Youtube.com.  Begin with "The Three Little Pigs" then "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs".

6) Ask the following questions after each story: 

  • Who were the characters in the story?
  • Who was telling the story? Is that a character or narrator?
  • Where did the story take place?
  • What was the problem?
  • What was the solution?

30 minutes

7) After the whole group discussion on each story, show the students the blank story map on the interactive white board. Discuss each section in the story map. First, complete "The Three Little Pigs" story map on the board using as a whole group.

8) Use another blank story map for "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs". Have individual students write answers on the board. Call on various students to describe the key details in the text. 

20 minutes

9) Showing both story maps side by side, tell the students they will be using a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the two stories. Recall previous learning by reviewing the uses of a Venn diagram.

10) Model how to title the Venn Diagram on the interactive white board. Split students into their small groups. Each group will work together to have 5 items in each section of the Venn Diagram. Monitor groups by walking around and observing.

11) Using their small group's Venn Diagram, students will share answers with whole group. Teacher records answers on large Venn diagram on the interactive white board.  

20 minutes

12) Check for understanding by asking students if they can now identify who is telling a story. Ask students the difference between characters and narrator.

13) Using the Venn diagram of "The Three Little Pigs" and "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs", students should independently decide which version of the story is most believable. 

14) Teacher will keep track of students' beliefs using a T-chart and tally marks on the whiteboard. Which character do students believe most? The pigs or the wolf.

15) Once all students have shared their opinions, the teacher will pass out 1 iPad per group of students (5 total).

16) The groups will open Create A Graph and use the compiled tally marks to create a bar graph using the information. Students will collaborate to create a title, enter the class opinions, and save the bar graph. (http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx?ID=69b617e88ec54b0680841c2a8709cc50

17) Students should be able to easily compare the class opinion on which narrator was most believable, the wolf or the pigs, by viewing the group created bar graph. 

18) Lead the bar graph comparison into the daily math lesson. 



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Formative assessment of the learning target includes teacher observation, completed Venn Diagrams, and small group created bar graphs.

Check Venn diagrams for completion. 

Use rubric to evaluate completed bar graphs. 

A weekly summative assessment on short story elements will take place at a later date. 

Acceleration:

For students who are easily able to identify who is telling a story at various times in a text, they need to be challenged. Students can read library books daily and identify the narrator, characters, setting, problems, and solutions in the text. Students can check their comprehension by taking online assessments on various AR books. 

Intervention:

Students who are not mastering the standard need additional, individual help with the instructor. Using similar short stories, the teacher would have a small group or individual lesson where students read the stories aloud and answer various questions asked about the story. 

Sample Questions-Who are the people in the story? Who are the animals in the story? Those are the characters. Who is the story mostly about? Who is telling the story? Where is the story happening? What happens first, next, then, last? What is the problem in the story? How is the story solved? 

By reviewing the characters, setting, major events, and key details students will become more comfortable with identifying who is telling a story. 


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.