ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Whoa! Where'd It Go? (States of Matter Data Collection)

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Jennifer Bruno
System: Trussville City
School: Paine Primary School
And
Author:Angela Shorter
System: Trussville City
School: Trussville City Board Of Education
The event this resource created for:NASA
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 34196

Title:

Whoa! Where'd It Go? (States of Matter Data Collection)

Overview/Annotation:

This lesson allows students to use the properties and characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases to determine how different variables affect states of matter.  Students predict what will happen and spend short amounts of time daily to observe and record data.  Students will graph their data into charts to see patterns and solve math problems. 

This lesson was created as a part of the 2016 NASA STEM Standards of Practice Project, a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2015 (2016)
Grade: 2
1 ) Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (See Appendix A, Table 1.) [2-OA1]


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
4NPO3a: Add and subtract:
  • Whole numbers, or
  • Fractions with like denominators, or
  • Decimals through hundredths.




Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.2.1- Represent addition and subtraction by using objects, pictures, fingers, or sounds (within 30).


Mathematics
MA2015 (2016)
Grade: 2
23 ) Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph. (See Appendix A, Table 1.) [2-MD10]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.2.23- Use a pictograph, limited to 2 categories, to answer more/less, most/least, or equal to questions (limited to two categories and a combined total of no more than 30 objects/pictures shown for the 2 categories).


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 2
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Engaging in Argument from Evidence
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and Effect
Disciplinary Core Idea: Matter and Its Interactions
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Construct an argument with evidence to support a claim that some changes in matter caused by heating and cooling can be reversed and some cannot.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Properties
  • Evidence
  • Change
  • Matter
  • Heating
  • Cooling
  • Reversible
  • Irreversible
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Characteristics of materials before heating or cooling.
  • Characteristics of materials after heating and cooling.
  • Characteristics of materials when heating or cooling is reversed.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Analyze evidence to support a claim that heating and cooling causes change in matter.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Heating or cooling a substance may cause changes that can be observed. Sometimes these changes are reversible and sometimes they are not.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Matter
Solids and Liquids, FOSS

NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.6: One way to change matter from one state to another and back again is by heating and cooling.



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.2.4- Predict changes to matter, reversible and irreversible, that may occur when matter is heated or cooled (e.g., heating or freezing water, boiling an egg, baking a cake).


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 2
10 ) Collect and evaluate data to identify water found on Earth and determine whether it is a solid or a liquid (e.g., glaciers as solid forms of water; oceans, lakes, rivers, streams as liquid forms of water).

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: Earth's Systems
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Obtain information to identify where water is found on Earth and that it can be solid or liquid.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Collect
  • Evaluate
  • Solid
  • Liquid
  • Glaciers
  • Oceans
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Streams
  • Frozen
  • Ponds
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Water is found in many places on Earth.
  • Water exists as solid ice and in liquid form.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify which sources of information are likely to provide scientific information.
  • Collect and evaluate data to identify water found on Earth.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are observable patterns as to where water is found on Earth and what form it is in.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Soils and Shores
Pebbles, Sand, and Silt, FOSS
Shrinking Shore, ETA/hand2mind

NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
E4.4: Earth materials that occur in nature include rocks, minerals, soils, water, and the gases of the atmosphere.



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.2.10- Identify places water is found on Earth as a liquid (e.g., river, lake, ocean) and as a solid (ice/glacier).


Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

The students will collect, observe, and record data related to evaporation and condensation, based on temperature. 

Using the data collected, students will create a chart/graph to record their data. 

Students will respond to the teacher's questions using charts/graphs, as well as create their own application/real world/word problems using their data.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

91 to 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

  • even number of identical, clear containers (number depends upon whether students do experiments as whole-group, small groups, pairs, or individuals
  • lids to fit clear containers (one per pair of containers)
  • graduated cylinder(s)
  • thermometers (one per pair of containers)
  • writing utensils
  • paper for data collection (can use notebook paper, attached forms, or student-created forms)

Technology Resources Needed:

YouTube Video States of Matter- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2UsLB4kIJo (34 minutes)

Projection system or personal devices to view video

Background/Preparation:

If states of matter are not discussed in textbooks or taught in modules, the following link can be used:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2UsLB4kIJo

  Procedures/Activities: 

INTRODUCTION:

1.  Students will review with peers the states of matter, the properties of matter, and each state's chemical makeup.  (If this is not a review, this needs to be taught.)

2.  Students will discuss with their teacher how the increase or removal of heat affects changes in states of matter. (Removal of heat from a gas leads to formation of a liquid; removal of heat from a liquid leads to formation of a solid; addition of heat to a solid leads to formation of liquid; addition of heat to a liquid leads to formation of gas)

 

ACTIVITY/EXPERIMENT:

1.   The teacher will discuss the importance of changing only one variable per experiment in order to keep results valid and know what actually causes changes in data.

2.  Based on grade level, ability, or preference:

     a.  Students may design their own experiments to show how the increasing or removing of heat in the environment affects changes in states of matter.

     b.  Students may design their own parameters for experiments to show how the increasing or removing of heat in the environment affects changes in states of matter.

     c.  Students may be given experiments to show how the increasing or removing of heat in the environment affects changes in states of matter.  Example experiments:

  • Place one clear lidded container and one clear open container on the windowsill in direct sunlight.  Place a thermometer next to the containers.
  • Place one clear lidded container and one clear open container in indirect sunlight.  Place a thermometer next to the containers.
  • Place one clear lidded container and one clear open container in a closet.  Place a thermometer next to the containers.
  • Place one clear lidded container and one clear open container outside in a low-traffic area, which is also covered as to not have rain water affect the experiment.  Place a thermometer next to the containers.
  • Place one clear lidded container and one clear open container on top of a refrigerator.  Place a thermometer next to the containers.
  • Give examples of some of the locations to place containers, and allow students to choose their own locations.

3.  Students will begin with 100 mL of water in the lidded container, and 100 mL of water in the open container.  The containers are placed side-by-side with the thermometer in between the containers.

4.  Based on grade level, ability, or preference:

     a.  The teacher will observe experiment(s) with class and record data daily.  The teacher will briefly discuss findings with class.  (This can be done on chart paper for the entire class, or possible data recording sheets are attached for use on document cameras.)

     b.  Students will observe experiment(s) and record data daily.  (Possible data recording sheets attached.)

4.  The teacher will draw class in, periodically, to discuss findings to date.

 

MATH:

 1. Halfway through experiments, the teacher will have students determine the mathematical difference in mL from the beginning of the project to date.  The teacher will ask students to predict the number of mL that will be left at the end of the project, using their knowledge of doubles and halves.

2.  At the end of the experiments, students will transfer data collected into bar graphs.

3.  Students will answer questions, based on the bar graphs students created.  (Possible questions are attached.)

4.  Students will work in small groups or pairs to create application/word problems to show their findings.



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Possible assessments:

  • Daily checklists to ensure observations are being completed
  • Science journal entries
  • Assess math problems for accuracy
  • Rubric for student-designed word problems

Acceleration:

  • Students may journal daily or weekly to log what they're seeing and why they believe they're seeing it.
  • Students may visit NASA's Earth Observatory website to observe a water vapor map.  Students may predict/determine whether or not water vapor can be linked to the experiments they have been performing.
  • Website:

    http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/GlobalMaps/view.php?d1=MYDAL2_M_SKY_W

Intervention:

  • Students may be placed in heterogeneous groups, in which more-capable peers may help less-capable peers.
  • Teachers may collect data and record it whole-group, but allow students to reproduce that work individually or in pairs.

View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.